European Union

Tyler Durden's picture

This is What Happens to Walmart Pork Before It Reaches Your Plate





The cruelty inherent in animal factory farming is something that we as a species should find completely and totally unacceptable. Indeed, evidence shows that when people are exposed to the nightmarish conditions faced by factory animals prior to consumption they demand change. This is precisely why corporate interests have pushed ag-gag laws throughout the nation in an attempt to criminalize the exposure of these methods.

 
Eugen Bohm-Bawerk's picture

On the Impotence of Karlsruhe





If there is one single event that could derail the euro experiment it is the German Federal Constitutional Court ruling on the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) and Outright Market Transactions (OMT).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 31





  • US Blasts Germany's Economic Policies (WSJ)
  • Citigroup, JPMorgan Said to Put Currency Dealers on Leave (BBG)
  • Watchdog: Syria Destroys Chemical-Arms Equipment (WSJ)
  • Kynikos Alumni Start Hedge Fund Betting on Declining Stocks (BBG)
  • China state media calls for stern action after Tiananmen attack (RTRS)
  • IMF warns of financial shock risk to Africa (FT)
  • Insurers Oppose Obamacare Extension as Danger to Profits (BBG)
  • BoJ content to ignore Fed tapering and go its own way (FT)
  • U.S. attorney wants DOJ to take civil action against BofA (RTRS)
  • NSA Fallout Hits AT&T's Ambitions In Europe (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 30





  • Morning Humor from Hilsenrath - Fed Balance Sheet Not Seen Returning to Normal Until at Least 2019 (WSJ)
  • Health Policies Canceled in Latest Hurdle for Obamacare (BBG)
  • Was there anything RBS was not manipulating? RBS Said to Review Currency-Trading Practices Amid Probe (BBG)
  • Sebelius to Testify Before House Panel (WSJ)
  • And more humor: Spain's Statistics Institute Confirms End of Recession (WSJ) ... and now we await the triple dip
  • Finally some credible reporting on Yellen's "foresight" - Yellen feared housing bust but did not raise public alarm (Reuters)
  • Japan government moves closer to Fukushima takeover (FT)
  • China to step up own security after new NSA allegations (Reuters)
  • Blackstone Vies With Goldman in Spain Rental Housing Bet (BBG)
  • In new U.S. budget talks, Republican proposal has flipped the script (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Ohio Runs Out Of Pentobarbital, Can't Execute Convicts





Ohio said on Monday that it does not have enough of the lethal injection drug pentobarbital to carry out a scheduled execution next month. As Reuters reports, Ohio is the latest U.S. state to face a scarcity after the European manufacturer banned its sale for lethal injections of prisoners sentenced to death. The European Union is opposed to the death penalty (physical as opposed to economic) and has put pressure on US States to stop the practice. If only there was an anonymous online exchange where 'drugs' could be bought and sold to meet the demands of those looking for a quick fix (or multiple executions) despite the oversight of various freedoms by governments.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 23





  • Top China Banks Triple Debt Write-Offs as Defaults Loom (BBG)
  • PBOC suspends open market operations again (Global Times)
  • Eurozone bank shares fall after ECB outlines health check plan (FT)
  • O-Care falling behind (The Hill)
  • Key House Republican presses tech companies on Obamacare glitches (Reuters)
  • J.P. Morgan Faces Another Potential Huge Payouta (WSJ)
  • Yankees Among 10 MLB Teams Valued at More Than $1 Billion (BBG)
  • Free our reporter, begs newspaper as China cracks down on journalists (Reuters)
  • Peugeot Reviews Cost-Saving Alliance With GM (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

You Won't Believe What The French Are Taxing Now...





European MEP Nigel Farage blasted French President Francois Hollande as leading the pack “in the modern day Pantheon of idiots who are running countries around the world…” Of course, the French president had recently introduced a ‘hate tax’ on its countries most successful people, driving out whatever few productive people remain in France. But this hate tax was just the tip of le iceberg. Just look at what they’ve done or announced just in the last month...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 22





  • Despite budget win, Obama has weak hand with Congress (Reuters)
  • Carney Brings In McKinsey for Bank of England Strategy Rethink (BBG)
  • Bill Gates Buys Stake in Spanish Construction Company FCC (WSJ)
  • Jerusalem Mayor Barkat Seeks New Term in Race Arabs Sitting Out (BBG)
  • J.P. Morgan Aimed to Limit Damage (WSJ)
  • EU Lawmakers Reject Draghi Call for Bank Bondholder Clemency (BBG)
  • Wall Street Profits May Halve in Second Half (WSJ)
  • Petrobras-led group wins Brazil oil auction with minimum bid (Reuters)
  • Apple to Refresh IPads Amid Challenges for Tablet Share (BBG)
  • Italy plans to offer guarantees on govt bond derivatives (Reuters)
  • Berkshire Beats Apple as Favorite Stock of Tiger 21 Group (BBG)
 
Pivotfarm's picture

US Still Living on Borrowed Time





Dreams usually come to an end when we get to the good part. The juiciest part of the American dream has ended too

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Central Banks Have Broken Fiscal Policy In One Sentence





Economy Minister Fabrizio Saccomanni, a former deputy governor of the Bank of Italy, acknowledged that "more could have been done." He said political squabbling had complicated the government's work, but pointed out that that the budget keeps Italy's deficit below 3% of gross domestic product, as European Union rules require. "Everybody hates this budget, but the stock market is up and the spread is down," Mr. Saccomanni noted.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Another BTFD Week Begins





Following last week's last two day panic buying driven not by data (since in the US it has been delayed until late October and November, and elsewhere in the world it is just getting worse) but by the catalyst that the US isn't going to default (yes, that's all that is needed to push the S&P to all time highs) and just hopes that the tapering - that horrifying prospect of the Fed reducing its monthly monetization by $15 billion from $85 to $70 billion in line with the decline in the US deficit - will be delayed until March or June 2014 because, you see, the Fed isn't sure how the economy is doing, it makes no sense to even comment on the market. Squeezes, momentum ignitions, rumors about what Messers Bernanke and Yellen had for breakfast, Goldman's 2015 S&P forecast of 2100: that's the lunacy that passes for market moving factors. News, and reality, have long since been put in the dust. Just keep an eye on flashing read headlines, and try to buy (remember: anyone caught selling by the NSA is guaranteed a lifetime of annual IRS audits) ahead of the algos. That's what Bernanke's centrally-planned "market" has devolved to.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The JPMorgan Problem Writ Large





JPMorgan Chase has had a bad year. Not only has the bank just reported its first quarterly loss in more than a decade; it has also agreed to a tentative deal to pay $4 billion to settle claims that it misled the government-sponsored mortgage agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac about the quality of billions of dollars of low-grade mortgages that it sold to them. Other big legal and regulatory costs loom. JPMorgan will bounce back, of course, but its travails have reopened the debate about what to do with banks that are “too big to fail.” We now have a global plan, of sorts, supplemented by various home-grown solutions in the US, the UK, and France, with the possibility of a European plan that would also differ from the others. In testimony to the UK Parliament, Volcker gently observed that “Internationalizing some of the basic regulations [would make] a level playing field. It is obviously not ideal that the US has the Volcker rule and [the UK has] Vickers…” He was surely right, but “too big to fail” is another area in which the initial post-crisis enthusiasm for global solutions has failed. The unfortunate result is an uneven playing field, with incentives for banks to relocate operations, whether geographically or in terms of legal entities. That is not the outcome that the G-20 – or anyone else – sought back in 2009.

 
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