• StalingradandPoorski
    03/04/2015 - 16:46
    What people and central bankers do not understand, is that you can't devalue your way to prosperity. Absolutely nothing has changed since the last crisis. The same too big too fail banks have only...

Eurozone

Tyler Durden's picture

Nasdaq 5,000 Is Different This Time... But Not In A Good Way!





So today what is different is not the Wall Street spiel that Nasdaq is anchored by the likes of Apple rather than Webvan. Since the two days of March 9 and 10 in the year 2000 when the Nasdaq closed over the 5,000, the financial markets have been converted into central bank managed gambling halls and the global economy has bloated beyond recognition by 15 years of non-stop financial repression. Back then, a few hundred stocks were wildly over-valued based on monetizing eyeballs; now the entire market is drastically overvalued owing to the false financial market liquidity generated by $14 trillion of central bank asset monetization - mostly public debt - since the turn of the century. As a result, the global financial system and economy are orders of magnitude more fragile and vulnerable to collapse than they were 15 years ago.

 
George Washington's picture

How the West Got Hooked On “Humanitarian War”





Bill Clinton Dusted Off the Same Marketing Strategy Which Bad-Mustache Used On the Eve of Invading Poland ... And Obama's Been Using It Ever Since

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Great Big Fat Greek Expectations





It is becoming clear that a pretty wide divide seems to appear between what many people think the Syriza government in Athens should do, and what they actually can do at this point in time. It should be useful to clarify what this divide consists of, and how it can be breached, if that is at all possible.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Market Wrap: Futures Slide Despite Latest Central Bank Easing Blitz





Just like yesterday, it has - so far - been mostly about Asia in the overnight session, where as reported previously, we got the latest central bank engaging in an "unexpected" rate cut, after Reserve Bank of India Governor Rajan cut rates in an unscheduled move days after the government agreed for the first time to give the central bank a legal mandate to target inflation. This was India's second rate cut in 2 months, and yet despite the Sensex surging to a all time high over 30,000, it subsequently ended up closing red on the day, down -0.7%, despite the Indian currency sliding 0.4% to 62.1463 to a dollar. Is the half-life of thany incremental rate cut in an unprecedented barage of global central bank easing now less than a day?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Mario Draghi Is Putting Pensioners At Risk





Accommodative monetary policy, which is ostensibly supposed to stimulate aggregate demand thereby encouraging businesses to spend and hire, is now perversely causing people to work longer and preventing new employees from having access to a secure retirement.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A Complete Preview Of Q€ — And Why It Will Fail





To be sure, we’ve written quite a bit lately about the ECB’s upcoming plunge into the world of 13-figure debt monetization (or as we call it, Draghi’s Waterloo), and while we hate to beat a dead horse, the sheer lunacy of a bond buying program that is only constrained by the fact that there simply aren’t enough bonds to buy, cannot possibly be overstated. Here is everything you need to know about Q€ ahead of the ECB's Thursday meeting.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Market Wrap: Futures Decline; Treasurys Weak On Actavis Mega-Deal, Dollar At 12 Year High





With little newsflow out of Europe, and just as little on deck out of the US (just NY ISM and auto sales later today), the main overnight events were out of Asia where first the RBA decided to leave rates unchanged but not before the announcement was leaked up to a minute early. In China, the rate-cut euphoria lasted just one day, and after a feeble 0.8% bounce on Monday, the SHCOMP was down 2.2% this morning over fears the PBOC is doing too little, too late to halt what is now perceived by many as a massive "tightening" capital flight out of China. Finally, Japan made the newsflow, after it JGBs continued to slide following a weak auction, fears that the BOJ is done easing after Abe advisor Etsuro Honda warned against overheating, and after the biggest jump in base pay in over a decade led some to think the BOJ may soon have to halt easing altogether, especially if real wages proceed to rise

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fairy Tale Of Portugal's Successful Turnaround





Even a brief glance at the facts suffices. Portugal is no less bankrupt than Greece. The country’s government debt, at 124% of GDP, might be lower than in Greece. However, government debt is just one – even though important – part of the full debt picture. On an aggregate level, Portugal’s overall debt level - at 381% of GDP when also including private households and non-financial corporations - is well above Greece’s total debt level (286% of GDP). So while Greece’s problems mainly manifest themselves via government debt, Portugal suffers from too much debt in all three sectors of the economy.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Best And Worst Performing Assets In February And YTD





The best performing asset overall in 2015? Well, just tell Putin "spasibo"...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Are Central Banks Creating Deflation?





"By lowering the cost of borrowing, QE has lowered the risk of default. This has led to overcapacity (see highly leveraged shale companies). Overcapacity leads to deflation. With QE, are central banks manufacturing what they are trying to defeat?"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

PIIGS Go To War: Spain, Portugal Slam Tsipras' Accusations Of "Conspiracy Plot" To Overthrow Greek Government





Yesterday Tsipras made clear his displeasure with the betrayal of what were formerly his socio-economic equals quite well-known, when he accused Spain and Portugal on Saturday of leading a conservative conspiracy to topple his anti-austerity government, saying they feared their own radical forces before elections this year. As Reuters reports, in a speech to his Syriza party, Tsipras turned on Madrid and Lisbon, accusing them of taking a hard line in negotiations which led to the euro zone extending the bailout programme last week for four months. And the inevitable response: both nations are now demanding that the EU "arbitrate" and respond to Tsipras' allegations, in the process essentially validating his accusations.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

As Greece Scrambles To End Its Bank Run, JPM Throws A Wrench: Says Deposit Outflows Continued After "Deal"





Just when Greece thought it had bought itself some breathing room in its desperate attempt to rebuild confidence in its financial system, here comes JPM and effectively calls Yanis Varoufakis a liar, suggesting that Greek deposit outflows have continued at a brisk pace despite the bailout extension "deal."

 
Marc To Market's picture

Did the Dollar Get its Groove Back?





The US dollar firmed at the end of last week.  Does this mean the bull market has resumed after the consolidatig its gains in February?  

 
Tyler Durden's picture

5 Things To Ponder: Weekend Catch Up





With the "Great Greek Tragedy" now behind the markets, for the time being, all eyes have turned towards the Nasdaq's triumphant march back to 5000.  (The graphics department at CNBC have been working overtime on banners and bugs for when it happens....watch for them.) For now, it is all about the hopes of a cyclical upturn in the Eurozone economy supported by the ECB's QE program starting next month. Market participants have been bidding up stocks globally in anticipation that the ECB's program will pick up where the Fed left off, and the flood of liquidity will find its way back into asset prices

 
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