Eurozone

Italian Banks Crash Despite 'All Clear' From EU Stress Tests

For a few minutes at the open, mainstream business media persuaded itself that the EU stress tests had proved that everything was fine in Europe's banking system again. But very quickly, things went south with Italian banks - the center of the storm - reversing gains and then extending losses with Unicredit now down 8% (after being up 4%).

Euro Stocks Reverse Early Gains Dragged Lower By Slumping Banks; US Futures Flat; Crude Slides

Following last Friday's shocking weak US GDP print, Asian stocks jumped to an 11 month high on reduced prospects of a near-term rate hike, while the region also digested mostly encouraging in conflicting Chinese PMI data. European bank stocks initially rose following the release of the 2016 stress test then declined, tempering gains in global equity indexes, amid investor skepticism over the usefulness of stress-test results and weaker oil prices.

Michael Hudson: Obama Said Hillary Will Continue His Legacy – And Indeed She Will!

Trump is right in saying that there has not really been a recovery for the Rust Belt or for the 99%. Hillary brazens it out by claiming Obama's neoliberal economics have helped wage-earners, despite the debt deflation blocking recovery. She promises to continue his policies (backed by his same campaign funders). That would seem to be a losing strategy for this year's election – unless the Democrats gain control of the electronic voting machines, especially in Ohio.

Frontrunning: July 29

  • Yen, bond yields rise as Bank of Japan action underwhelms (Reuters); Bank of Japan Takes Modest Easing Action (WSJ)
  • Hong Kong shares end lower as BOJ disappointment sweeps Asia (Reuters)
  • Accepting White House nomination, Clinton offers 'clear-eyed' vision (Reuters)
  • Two Conventions, Two Distinct World Views (WSJ)
  • Democrats Emphasize American Exceptionalism at Convention (BBG)
  • Clinton’s Image Among Democrats at a Historic Low (WSJ)

Richard Koo: If Helicopter Money Succeeds, It Will Lead To 1,500% Inflation

"if businesses and households were to resume borrowing in earnest, the US money supply could balloon to 15 times its current size, sending inflation as high as 1,500%. The corresponding ratios are 28 times for Japan and Switzerland, five times for the eurozone, and 11 times for the UK. Once private-sector demand for loans recovers in these countries, confidence in the dollar, euro, and yen will plummet."

"Too Simple" Energy-Economy Models Give Misleading Answers

The common lay interpretation of simple models is that running out of energy supplies can be expected to be our overwhelming problem in the future. A more complete model suggests that our problems as we approach limits are likely to be quite different: growing wealth disparity, inability to maintain complex infrastructure, and growing debt problems. Energy supplies that look easy to extract will not, in fact, be available because prices will not rise high enough. These problems can be expected to change the shape of the curve of future energy consumption to one with a fairly fast decline, such as the Seneca Cliff.

A Post Western World? A Disturbing Interview With Prof. Harry Redner - Part 1

The political and economic issues broadly discussed in the media usually revolve around political cycles, terrorism, foreign policy, rising debt levels, sluggish economic performance, academic underachievement, environmental problems, ageing demographics and so forth.  In our view, this all ties into a major cycle of history that has been with us for some time, and which has been gaining traction since the 1990s: the end of "Western Civilization" and the transition towards a globalized society.

"Policymakers Have Been Calling A 'Depression' A 'Recovery' For Nearly A Decade"

"I'd like to think that logic and reality will prevail; that distaste for being told how great the world is has become sufficiently revolting and obviously false to stir the world’s populace to end the imbalances. But that, again, will take time, perhaps a good deal of time; until then, whenever it hopefully is, central banks continue to operate with impunity even though the risks of their intemperance rise exponentially..."

Investors Plow Record Cash Into Emerging Markets, As Europe Suffers Record Outflows

Whether it is due to the recent speculation that Japan may usher in helicopter money, or ongoing concerns about what Brexit may do to the future of European asset returns, there has been a dramatic shift in fund allocation and as Bank of America reports, investors are rushing to vote with their wallets. They have done so in the latest week by continuing to plow money into EM stocks, allocating a record amount of cash to Emerging Markets, while yanking a similarly record amount of cash from Europe.

Frontrunning: July 22

  • Global stocks fall, UK PMIs flash Brexit recession warning (Reuters)
  • Trump's greatest hits, all in one speech (Reuters)
  • Donald Trump Accepts GOP Nomination, Promises to Fix America (WSJ)
  • Trump's America Grows More Ominous Over 13-Month Run (BBG)
  • Hillary Clinton: unwitting star of the Republican convention (FT)
  • Clinton faces pressure to pick VP who is tough on trade, Wall Street (Reuters)

10Y Bund Yield Falls Back Under 0% After Draghi Leave QE Program Unchanged In Less Dovish Announcement

Earlier we previewed the prevailing consensus which expected Draghi to announce some easing if not in monetary policy, then in the bank's QE program to make more German securities eligible. However, that did not happen and instead Draghi said that the ECB did not have enough information to take decisions in regard to altering the current QE programme, with no attention paid to specific instruments.

Becoming Japan: "The Threat Of A Global Recession Is Growing"

As we laid out over a year ago,, this simple combination of productivity and demographic trends reveals that U.S. trend GDP growth is converging toward 1%. This is reminiscent of Japan during its "lost decades." Expanding this analysis to the rest of the G7, we find that every economy is effectively becoming Japan, and the sharpest slowdowns are happening outside North America.