Exchange Traded Fund

Axel Merk's 'Best Bubble Indicator' Is Setting Up For "Major Shock"

"In my experience, complacency, with its cousin low volatility, is the best bubble indicator I am aware of. Perceived safety gets investors to pile into investments that they later regret. When it happens on a massive scale, major market distortions may be created that can lead to financial crises. And as the tech bubble that burst in 2000 shows, even if there is no systemic risk, the unwinding can be most painful to investors."

S&P Futs Near All Time High On Strong Euro Data; Oil Drops On Trump's SPR Sale Plans

S&P futures rose alongside European stocks as Asian shares posted modest declines. The euro set a new six-month high and European bourses rose as PMI data from Germany and France signaled that the ECB will have to tighten soon as Europe's recovery remains on track, with the German Ifo business confidence printing at the highest level on record, and hinting at a GDP print in the 5% range.

Market Absurdity Squared: There Is Now An ETF ETF

A landmark event took place yesterday, one which, at least according to Bank of America, may signal that we have hit a top. After $2.9 trillion of inflows to passive funds, and $1.3 trillion redemptions from active funds past 10 years, an ETF ETF has launched.

How Active Managers Can Profit From The ETFs' Takeover Of The Market

Sometime this week the 2,000th exchange traded fund will list on a domestic exchange. It is no exaggeration to say that there are more ETFs than investable stocks listed on US exchanges. Here is how active managers can profit from the relentless takeover of ETFs of the stock market.

Investors Have Pulled $8 Billion From Deutsche Bank's ETF Unit

DB has continued to hemmorhage cash with the FT reporting that the German lender's exchange traded fund unit has seen billions in outflows as Germany’s biggest lender considers whether to sell parts of its asset management business. Specifically, investors have pulled $8bn from Deutsche’s ETF arm so far this year.

Panicked Brits Rush To Buy Gold Bars, Stuff Them In Home Safes

Worried British savers are scrambling to buy gold bars and "stuffing them in safes at home, data suggests, as fears mount that a Brexit-induced financial meltdown could be just around the corner." The paper cites Google search data for the term "home safe" which is running 61% higher than the level at which it peaked in November 2008, the point of the financial crisis, and is now higher than at any point since. In other words, whether intended or not, locals are more terrified of the outcome of Thursday's vote than the near-collapse of the financial system in the aftermath of Lehmans' failure.