Expert Networks

Is Steve Cohen Back To His Criminal Ways

We were hoping that Mr. Cohen, who surely would not want his name dragged back into another insider trading scandal as he prepares to move back to managing other people's money which he will be allowed to do in two years time, now that the SEC has granted him a reprieve from the isolation of a family office, will provide us with the required information, the same information which several years ago was material enough for the Feds to unleash the most historic crackdown on a legendary hedge fund in modern capital market history.

Nassim Taleb's Fund Made $1 Billion On Monday; This Is How The Other "Hedge" Funds Did

You can't say Nassim Taleb didn't warn you: the outspoken academic-philosopher, best known for his prediction that six sigma "fat tail", or black swan, events happen much more frequently than they should statistically (perhaps a main reason why there is no longer a market but a centrally-planned cesspool of academic intervention) just had a black swan land smack in the middle of the Universa hedge fund founded by ardent Ron Paul supporter Mark Spitznagel, and affiliated with Nassim Taleb. The result: a $1 billion payday, translating into a 20% YTD return, in a week when the VIX exploded from the teens to over 50, and which most other hedge funds would love to forget.

Steve Cohen Is Now Hiring "Creative And Innovative" Traders Right Out Of College

In 2014, the Firm launched the Point72 Academy. The Academy develops undergrads straight out of college into highly-skilled investors on an accelerated timeline.
From the day they start, Academy members have substantial responsibility and opportunities to contribute in a small team setting.
Today, more than half of Point72’s current Portfolio Managers started as Analysts and the Point72 Academy will grow that number over time.

How The World's Most Leveraged Hedge Fund Got Away With Insider Trading

"... Shortly after returning from a trip in late 2009, Farmer erased electronic notes, in Microsoft Word format, that were stored on thumb drives, Zip drives and a shared drive at Citadel, agents wrote in a summary of one of the interviews with him. Farmer also threw away his handwritten notes because that was his normal practice and because they were incriminating, agents wrote. Farmer got rid of e-mails as well, according to their summary. “This,” they wrote, “wiped the slate clean."

The News Industry Isn't Dead... But Has 1 Foot In The Grave

Journalism and investment research have a lot in common, notes ConvergEx's Nick Colas; after all, both essentially ask the customer to freely part with three scarce resources: time, attention and money. It’s been a tough decade or two for both the newsroom and the research department in that effort, but at least one prominent venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen, thinks there is a future for the news business, however, due to a rising middle class in emerging markets and mobile Internet distribution. While this audience may not (yet/ever) be hankering to read Buy-Sell-Hold reports on their smartphones, Andreessen’s recently published 8-fold strategy for journalism has lessons for investment research as well. The big takeaway: sell-side research needs to change a lot – and quickly - to survive as anything more than an advertising vehicle for brokerage firms.

The New Name Of SAC Capital Has Been Revealed

... And it is Point72. Of course, those who are aware of the physical address of the firm that single handedly made and destroyed "expert networks" (and assured a daily bug sweep at every hedge fund office in New York), or better yet, have visited the firm's sprawling trading floor located at 72 Cummings Point, will know that the name is merely a derivative of the actual address. Then again, perhaps when it comes to address-based appelations, Cohen picked the only feasible option: after all going with the zip code of his trading desk adress may have been a little too reminiscent of a convict's inmate number: 06902. And that would hardly inspire confidence in the New and Improved Stevie A. Cohen.

Which Hedge Fund Strategies Will Work In 2014: Deutsche Bank's Take

While January was a bad month for the market, it was certainly one which the majority of hedge funds would also rather forget as we showed yesterday. So with volatility, the lack of a clear daily ramp higher (with the exception of the last 4 days which are straight from the 2013 play book), and, worst of all, that Old Normal staple - risk - back in the picture. what is a collector of 2 and 20 to do (especially since in the post-Steve Cohen world, one must now make their money the old-fashioned way: without access to "expert networks")? For everyone asking this question, here is Deutsche Bank with its take on which will be the best and worst performing strategies of 2014. So without further ado, here is the Deutsche Bank Asset and Wealth Management's forecast of hedge fund performance matrix...

This Is How Much The Banks Paid To Get The "Volcker Rule" Outcome They Desired

Curious how much the various banks who stood to be impacted by or, otherwise, benefit from either a concentration or dilution of the Volcker rule? According to OpenSecrets, which crunched the numbers, here is how much being able to continue prop trading meant to some of the largest US banks and lobby groups:

Not bad considering the loophole-ridden Volcker Rule will effectively permit "hedge" books (where an army of lawyers paid $1000/hour defines just what a hedge is) to continue piling on billions of dollars in wildly profitable, Fed reserve funded trades.

The Steve Cohen Era Is Over: S.A.C. To Plead Guilty To Securities Fraud, Stop Managing Outside Money

Nearly three years ago, before anyone had heard of expert networks, before the SEC had brought any major enforcement action against any hedge fund and long before anyone had to gall to accuse SAC of insider trading, Zero Hedge started a series of posts commencing with "Is The SEC's Insider Trading Case Implicating FrontPoint A Sting Operation Aimed At S.A.C. Capital?" exposing the fraudulent transactions of Steve Cohne's hedge fund despite fears of violent legal reprisals. We are delighted to inform our readers that this particular chapter is now over: the WSJ has just reported that SAC will plead guilty to securities fraud, pay a final $1.2 billion penalty (still a tiny sum compared to all the ill-gotten gains by Steve Cohen over the years), and most importantly, end the fund's management of outside money.