Fibonacci

Tyler Durden's picture

Boring Overnight Session Redeemed By Latest Japanese Lie; Egypt Death Toll Soars





In a session that has been painfully boring so far (yet which should pick up with CPI, jobless claims, industrial production and the NY Empire Fed on deck, as well as Wal-Mart earnings which will no doubt reflect the continuing disappointing retail plight) perhaps the only notable news was that Japan - the nation that brought you "Fukushima is contained" - was caught in yet another lie. Recall that the upside catalyst (and source of Yen weakness) two days ago was what we classified then as "paradoxical news" that Japan would cut corporate taxes in a move that somehow would offset the upcoming consumption tax hike. Turns out that, as our gut sense indicated, this was merely yet another BS trial balloon out of Japan, which admitted overnight that the entire report was a lie.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Dead Cat Bounce" Or "Pause That Refreshes"





While the off-the-lows mentality of today's market performance was heralded by most as a signal that the BTFD'rs are back, we gently remind them that the Nikkei (futures) did not bounce at all... In fact S&P futures bounced to a rather eerily perfect 38.2% Fibonacci retracement of the overnight plunge and then faded into the close. All the major indices managed to get back to unchanged on the day (but the S&P 500 was the last to make it and instantly turned around once it did). Credit markets opened gap wider and did not bounce back anything like stocks. Treasuries sold off modestly from their pre-opening levels then drifted lower in yield into the close (ending down 2-3bps on the day but up 6-7bps on the week). The USD weakened most of the day and commodities gained on the day with gold and silver now up over 2% on the week. VIX fell from the open to the close but ended the day higher as we suspect hedges were lifted and exposure reduced into the bounce.

 
GoldCore's picture

Consumers Snap Up Gold & Silver Jewellery





 

Jewellers across the world are seeing a surge in jewellery purchases because consumers are taking advantage of the price drop and purchasing investment pieces that will grow in value over time.

In the USA with Mother’s Day approaching this weekend, consumers like Whitney Court who would normally buy flowers instead wants to purchase something that won’t wilt: a silver necklace. 

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fun With Fibonacci Flashbacks





When a 'blog' puts the words Fibonacci, Gold, and Stocks in the same post, it well and truly earns its 'tin-foil-hat'-wearing "digital dickweed" honors. And so, we present, for the edification of all those who believe in gold as the only sound numeraire for judging value; for those who believe it's never different this time; and for those who believe in dead-cat-bounces; the Dow in Gold in the 30s, 70s, and Now...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Silver Is Having Its Best Day in 15 Months





In all the excitement over gold, silver has been largely ignored or forgotten. Today, it was the "poor man's gold"'s turn to stae a dramatic comeback posting its biggest single-day jump in 15 months. Having now retraced the Fibonacci 38.2% level of the record plunge, it appears $25 is th enext target - which is around 50% retracement levels.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Chart Of The Day: The Fibonacci Fade And January 22





For the Fibonacci fans out there, here is something rather stunning from Newedge's Brad Wishak. In the chart below, the strategist looks at the duration in days of each stock rally leg since the 2009 bottom. What is rather amazing is follow through between one rally and the next in terms of, you guessed it, the Fib 61.8% retracement. As Wishak comments: "obvious is the diminishing marginal utility of each bath of QE manifesting itself in shorter and shorter rallies. Less obvious is the underlying rhythm of the start and stopping points. Applying the 61.8% retrace to time, called the the most recent September stock highs within 4 days. And projecting this pattern forward, we're now just around the corner from the next 61.8% top, which hits on January 22." Because if in a centrally-planned world DeMark indicators still have any relevance, then certainly so does Fibonacci.

 
AVFMS's picture

28 Nov 2012 – “ I Thank You ” (ZZ Top, 1979)





Once more, not much own stuff to chew on Europe’s own. Drifting. EGBs very strong on (relative) equity weakness. Periphery starting to glow like the ZZ Top Eliminator. In absence of any strong lead, need to start thanking everyone for input and support (Mario, Ben, Angie, Chrissie… Anyone working on the Fiscal Cliff. Mariano & Mario. Wolfie...). New paradigm put into practice: nothing will ever be weak again, nothing. And watch out for FC Ping-Pong! And I Thank You!

"I Thank You" (Bunds 1,37% -6; Spain 5,31% -20; Stoxx 2547 +0,4%; EUR 1,293 unch)

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Euro Gold Record Over 1,400 EUR/oz By Year End – Commerzbank





The yellow metal soared 4.9% in euros in one week from the 11 week low set November 2nd and has since fallen 1.3%.  The rebound from the November dip means prices should recover to reach the all-time euro high set last month, before rising to the point-and-figure target at 1,395 euros, said the bank’s research.  Point and figure charts estimate trends in prices without showing time. Gold may then reach a Fibonacci level of about 1,421, the 61.8% extension of the May-to-October rally, projected from the November low, Commerzbank wrote in its report on November 13th which was picked up by Bloomberg. Fibonacci analysis is based on the theory that prices climb or drop by certain percentages after reaching a high or low. “What we are seeing is a correction lower, nothing more,” Axel Rudolph, a technical analyst at Commerzbank in London, said by e-mail Nov. 16, referring to the drop since November 9th.  Rudolph remains bullish as long as prices hold above the November low at about 1,303 euros.  Technical analysts study charts of trading patterns and prices to predict changes in a security, commodity, currency or index.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

All Quiet On The Day After The Day After





The much anticipated Greek vote on "self-imposed" austerity came, saw and passed... and nothing: the EURUSD is now well lower than before the vote for one simple reason - the vote was merely a placeholder to test the resiliency of the government, which following numerous MP terminations, has seen its overall majority drop to 168 of 300, which includes the members of the Democratic Left who voted against the Troika proposal. Which means any more votes on anything split along austerity party lines and the vote will likely no longer pass. And, as expected, Germany already picked up the baton on kicking the can on funding the Greek €31.5 billion payment (due originally many months ago) when Schauble said that it will still be too early to make a Greek decision net week.  Market-wise, Europe is limping into the US open, with the EUR weaker again due to a report that Spain may not seek an ECB bailout this year (as said here over and over, Spain will not seek a bailout until the 10 Year SPGB is back at or above 7%). Paradoxically, Spain also sold €4.76 billion in 2015, 2018 and 2032 debt (more than the expected €4.5 billion) at muted conditions, thereby the market continues to encourage Spain not to request a bailout, although this may not last, as promptly after the bond auction Spanish debt tailed off, the 2Y and 10Y both sold off, and the Spain-Bund spread is back to 445 bps, the widest since October, and means Spain can finally be getting back in selloff play: and probably not at the best possible time just as everything else, which was in suspended animation until the Obama reelection, also hits the tape. Today we get two key, if largely irrelevant, central bank decisions come from the BOE and ECB, both of which are expected to do nothing much. Finally, the most important event going on right now, is the Chinese Congress. For those who missed it, our previews are here: The Far More Important 'Election' Part 1: China's Political Process and The Far More Important 'Election' Part 2: China's Market Implications.

 
thetechnicaltake's picture

It's All About Timing





The markets are all about timing. In this case, 55 weeks.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Why QE May Not Boost Stocks After All





If there is one dominant consensus in the financial sphere, it is that the Federal Reserve's $85 billion/month bond-and-mortgage-buying "quantitative easing" will inevitably send stocks higher. The general idea is that the Fed buys the mortgage-backed securities (MBS) and Treasury bonds from the banks, which turn around and dump the cash into "risk on" assets like equities (stocks). This consensus can be summarized in the time-worn phrase, "Don't fight the Fed." This near-universal confidence in a QE-goosed stock market is reflected in the low level of volatility (the VIX) and other signs of complacency such as relatively few buyers of put options, which are viewed as "insurance" against a decline in stocks. The usual sentiment readings are bullish as well.

But what if QE fails to send stocks higher? Is such a thing even possible? Yes, it does seem "impossible" in a market as rigged and centrally managed as this one, but there are a handful of reasons why QE might not unleash a flood of cash into "risk on" assets every month from now until Doomsday

 
dottjt's picture

The Zero Hedge Daily Round Up #133 – 09/25/2012





Today's Zero Hedge Articles in Audio Summary. "Americans don't struggle. North Koreans struggle." Everyday 8-9pm @ New York Time.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How A 12th Century Mathematician Just Doomed Bernanke's Wealth Effect





Leonardo Fibonacci (1170-1250) may have just stuck his 'golden-ratio-based' fork in the equity market's rally. As the following chart shows, the diminishing marginal utility of Quantitative Easing's wealth effect has followed a rather remarkable pattern... and today marks the next turning point.

 
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