Financial Regulation

Tyler Durden's picture

His Name Was Jeremy Stein: Fed's Lone Bubble-Spotter Resigns





The last year or two has seen a deluge of Fed speakers pay lip-service to watching/monitoring/keeping-an-eye-on potential bubbles... but as yet having found none... That is all except one - Jeremy Stein - who explicitly called out high yield bonds as in a 'frothy' bubble last year... it appears he has grown weary of smashing his head against that wall...

  • *FED SAYS STEIN SUBMITTED RESIGNATION LETTER TO OBAMA
  • *YELLEN SAYS STEIN WAS 'AN INTELLECTUAL LEADER' ON FED BOARD

Stein plans to return to teaching at Harvard but in his resignation letter noted that more work is needed on the job market and that the financial market needs strengthening.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Crimea's Economy Summarized





As the clock ticks down to tomorrow's Crimea referendum, where residents will vote to align with Russia or to stay in Ukraine, Russia Today looks at what the sunny Black Sea peninsula can offer economically and what ties it has with Moscow and Kiev. At first glance, Crimea has certain problems - a lack of energy, and more dangerously, freshwater resources. The republic's annual GDP is only $4.3 billion - 500 times smaller than the size of Russia’s $2 trillion economy. However, whatever the results of the referendum are, fixing the dilapidated state of infrastructure and transport could offer a real investment opportunity for both Russian companies and Crimean entrepreneurs.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Rise On Big Misses In Chinese Industrial Production, Retail Sales And Fixed Investment





It was another day of ugly overnight macro data, all of it ouf of China, with industrial production (8.6%, Exp. 9.5%, Last 9.7%), retail sales (11.8%, Exp. 13.5%, Last 13.1%) and fixed asset investment (17.9% YTD vs 19.4% expected) all missing badly and confirming that in a world of deleveraging, the Chinese economy will continue to sputter. Which is precisely what the "bad news is good news" algos needs and why futures levitated overnight: only this time instead of latching on to the USDJPY correlation pair, it was the AUDJPY which surged after Australia - that Chinese economic derivative - posted its third best monthly full-time jobs surge in history! One can be certain that won't last. But for now it has served its purpose and futures are once again green. How much longer will the disconnect between deteriorating global macro conditions and rising global markets continue, nobody knows, but sooner rather than later the central planner punch bowl will be pulled and the moment of price discovery truth will come. It will be a doozy.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Welcome To The Blackstone Recovery: Over 11 Million Americans Spend More Than Half Their Income On Rent





As 11.3 million Americans spend more than half their income on rent, a record increase of 28% in four years, increasingly more are faced with the core "New normal recovery" choice: “We either eat, or we pay rent.”  Welcome to the Blackstone recovery...

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Obamacare’s Many Negative Side-Effects Should Surprise No One





Government intervention, no matter what its form or intention, causes iatrogenics — unintended negative consequences that hurt the very people they’re intended to help. Nowhere is this better exemplified than with Obamacare, a policy intended to bring insurance to all that has in effect taken it away from many. Perhaps the growing coalition of people recognizing this paradox will take this revelation and apply it to other policy arenas as well. For the affected classes, we can only hope.

 


GoldCore's picture

Bloomberg: How to Keep Banks From Rigging Gold Prices





Allegations that banks are manipulating gold prices lower continue to gain credence and Bloomberg have published an article by Rosa Abrantes-Metz entitled ‘How to Keep Banks From Rigging Gold Prices’

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: December 11





  • Wall Street Exhales as Volcker Rule Seen Sparing Market-Making (Bloomberg)
  • GM to End Manufacturing Down Under, Citing Costs (WSJ)
  • U.S. budget deal could usher in new era of cooperation (Reuters)
  • Ukraine Police Back Off After Failing to Stop Protest (WSJ)
  • First Walmart, now Costco misses (AP)
  • Dan Fuss Joins Bill Gross Shunning Long-Term Debt Before Taper (BBG)
  • China New Yuan Loans Higher Than Expected (WSJ)
  • China bitcoin arbitrage ends as traders work around capital controls (Reuters)
  • Blackstone’s Hilton Joins Ranks of Biggest Deal Paydays (BBG)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Larry Summers: "History Will Overwhelmingly Approve QE"





For anyone who still suggests, incorrectly, that Larry Summers was the "wrong" choice for Fed Chairman just because he would promptly end QE the second he was elected as the erroneous popular meme goes, we have one soundbite from his recent Bloomberg TV interview refuting all such speculation: "if you had to say, should we have used this tool or should we not have, I think the answer is overwhelming that we should have." He had some other amusing logical fallacies (including discussing whether the market is in a bubble) all of which are transcribed below, but the best one is the following: "I think it does bear emphasis that the people who were most appalled by it are the people who have been predicting hyperinflation around the corner for four years now and they have been wrong at every turn." And let's not forget that "subprime is contained" - until it isn't. Then again, the last time we checked, the history on the biggest monetary experiment in history - one in which both the Fed and the BOJ are now openly monetizing 70% of gross bond issuance - has certainly not been written. Finally, in the off chance Summers is indeed correct, what history will instead say, is why instead of monetizing all the debt from day 1 of the Fed's inception in 1913, and thus pushing the stock market into scientific notation territory, did the Fed leave so many trillions of "wealth effect" on the table?

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Have Larry Summers And Paul Krugman Just Had Their Dimon/Dudley Moment?





A new opportunity to play "What's wrong with this picture" arose recently, with Larry Summers’ recent speech at the IMF and Paul Krugman’s follow-up blog. The two economists’ messages are slightly different, but combining them into one fictional character we shall call SK, their comments can be summed up "...essentially, we need to manufacture bubbles to achieve full employment equilibrium." With this new line of reasoning, SK have completely outdone themselves, but not in a good way. Think Jamie Dimon’s infamous “that’s why I’m richer than you” quip. Or, Bill Dudley’s memorable “but the price of iPads is falling” excuse for increases in basic living costs. Dimon and Dudley managed to encapsulate in single sentences much of what’s wrong with their institutions. Yet, they showed baffling ignorance of faults that are clear to the rest of us.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 18





  • What can possibly go wrong: Tepco Successfully Removes First Nuclear Fuel Rods at Fukushima (BBG)
  • Japan's Banks Find It Hard to Lend Easy Money (WSJ)
  • U.S. Military Eyes Cut to Pay, Benefits (WSJ)
  • Airbus to Boeing Cash In on Desert Outpost Made Field of Dreams (BBG); Dubai Air Show: Boeing leads order books race (BBG)
  • Sony sells 1 million PlayStation 4 units in first 24 hours (Reuters)
  • Russian Tycoon Prokhorov to Buy Kerimov's Uralkali Stake (WSJ)
  • Google Opening Showrooms to Show Off Gadgets for Holidays (BBG)
  • Need. Moar. Prop. Trading: Federal Reserve considering a delay to Volcker rule (FT)
  • Raghuram Rajan plans ‘dramatic remaking’ of India’s banking system (FT)
  • SAC Capital's Steinberg faces insider trading trial (Reuters)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 10





  • The ice breaks; fiscal talks set (The Hill); Ryan steps up to shape a deal (The Hill), as predicted here yesterday
  • Republicans consider short-term U.S. debt ceiling increase (Reuters)
  • Shutdown Standoff Shows Signs of a Thaw (WSJ)
  • JPMorgan Clients in Cash as Schwab’s Options Hedge Default (BBG)
  • Mitch McConnell, Senate GOP search for way out (Politico)
  • Meredith Whitney Winds Down Brokerage Unit After Setting Up Fund (BBG)
  • Washington Budget Chaos Keeps Fed Rates Low for Longer (BBG)
  • Chinese Premier Outlines US Debt Concerns (FT)
  • Saudis brace for 'nightmare' of U.S.-Iran rapprochement (Reuters)
  • Obama Urges Action on Yellen’s Fed Nomination (Reuters)
  • Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zidan Freed After Kidnap (WSJ)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

The Debt-Ceiling Fight "Could Get Ugly" - Key Dates And Implications





Even though there is no technical link between the two main fiscal issues – the continuing resolution (CR) and the debt ceiling bill - there is a link in the minds of market participants because prompt resolution of the CR could spell a favorable outcome for the debt limit. On the other hand, a government shutdown tonight could lead the market to be more pessimistic on the chances of a debt default. As BofAML notes, the link between the two issues is fairly complex but the shutdown battle is just the beginning - and, as the suspect "the fight could get ugly."

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Fed Post-Mortem And Overnight Summary





Yes, yes, only the Fed matters. Still, there was some event flow overnight which while completely meaningless for the epic liquidity bubble, may have some implications eventually when the music finally stops. In thie regard, perhaps the best summary of the the lunacy coming out of the Marriner Eccles building is the following sentence from Bloomberg: "Bernanke said he was concerned that market interest rates, driven higher by his own suggestion he would scale back QE, would curb growth." One can't make this up.

 


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