Global Economy

Global Stocks Rebound From Korea Jitters; S&P Flat As Fed Minutes Await; Oil Slides

S&P futures were little changed at 2,425, ignoring the N.Korea tensions of the past two days which will likely be a major topic in the upcoming G-20 summit, as European stocks fluctuate and Asian markets advance. Crude oil fell, snapping the longest winning streak this year, as Russia said it opposed any proposal to deepen OPEC-led production cuts.

Forget Draghi, Crude Matters

Despite Mario Draghi’s supposedly misinterpreted comments earlier this week, there are global indications that the best of this round has already been reached. Policymakers are always going to claim things are improving, that much is given. But there is tremendous difference between that and what has occurred, especially if it is indeed rolling over worldwide.

TDB's picture

I’m only half kidding about the cultural differences. In Australia, they eat kangaroos, in Iceland, they eat horses, and all over rabbits are regularly consumed. Is America’s culture so superior that we know for certain we have found the right combination of animals to slaughter for meat? Or is culture an appropriate issue to legislate, enshrining the “American way of life” into law?

BIS Lists The Four Biggest Threats Facing The Global Economy

i) inflation could choke the expansion by forcing central banks to tighten policy; ii) serious financial stress could materialise as financial cycles mature; iii) consumption might weaken under the weight of debt, and investment might fail to take over as the main growth engine; iv) a rise in protectionism could challenge the open global economic order.

Prepare For A Surge In Volume: Russell Rebalance Day Is Here

Welcome to the one year anniversary of the Brexit vote. Welcome also to the annual Russell rebalance, traditionally one of the busiest trading days of the year: last year's rebalance helped propel a near record turnover of over 15 billion shares. In fact, in four of the last five years, reconstitution day ranked in the 10 busiest trading sessions.

Albert Edwards: "Citizens Will Soon Turn Their Rage Towards Central Bankers"

"In an age of “radical uncertainty” how long will it be before angry citizens tire of blaming an impotent political system for their ills and turn on the main culprits for their poverty – unelected and virtually unaccountable central bankers? I expect central bank independence will be (and should be) the next casualty of the current political turmoil."