Greece

Tyler Durden's picture

Define Austerity: Spanish, Italian And Greek Debt/GDP Rise To Record Highs





Ask any European why their standard of living is so atrocious (after years of freeflowing debt-funded largesse) and the answer is well-known: austerity.Also ask any European if austerity means public debt should go up or down and the answer is also as clear: down. Which is why most Europeans will likely be confused to very confused when presented with the latest Eurostat data according to which not only did Eurozone debt rose remain just shy of all time record highs and certainly increasing from a year ago, but those PIIGS nations which are the first to blame austerity for everything, such as Greece (net of the debt wiped out as part of its 2012 bankruptcy of course), Portugal, Spain and Italy, all saw their public debt hit all time highs.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Second US Warship Enters Black Sea To "Promote Peace And Stability"





Less than two short weeks ago, the US sent their first warship into The Black Sea to "reassure NATO allies and Black Sea partners." Since then, thing shave escalated and then de-escalated last week with the so-called "truce deal." So why is the US sending a second ship? The Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Taylor (FFG 50), homeported in Mayport, Fla., will enter the Black Sea April 22 to "promote peace and stability in the region." We are sure that Putin will stand idly by and watch as NATO and the US build forces on his borders, but no matter how aggressive his response, the US Navy combat dolphin and sea lion team will not accompany the mission.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 22





  • Ukraine Accord Nears Collapse as Biden Meets Kiev Leaders (BBG)
  • Novartis reshapes business via deals with GSK and Lilly (Reuters)
  • Moscow Bankers See Fees Slide 67% as Ukraine Crisis Grows (BBG)
  • Why ECB's QE will be Ukraine's fault: Draghi Gauges Ukraine Effect as ECB Tackles Low Inflation (BBG)
  • As Phone Subsidies Fade, Apple Could Be Hurt (WSJ)
  • Amazon Sales Take a Hit in States With Online Tax (BBG)
  • Ford Speeds Up Succession Plan: Mark Fields, Auto Maker's No. 2, Seen Replacing Alan Mulally as CEO Ahead of Schedule (WSJ)
  • U.S. force in Afghanistan may be cut to less than 10,000 troops (Reuters)
  • IBM End to Buyback Splurge Pressures CEO to Boost Revenue (BBG)
 


Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Japan Has Proven That Central Banks Cannot Generate Growth With QE





Japan is where the Keynesian economic model rubber hit the road. And it's proven that QE is ultimately an economic dead end.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

This Is Madness!





Keep interest rates at zero, whilst printing trillions of dollars, pounds and yen out of thin air, and you can make investors do some pretty extraordinary things. "Central bankers control the price of money and therefore indirectly influence every market in the world. Given this immense power, the ideal central banker would be humble, cautious and deferential to market signals. Instead, modern central bankers are both bold and arrogant in their efforts to bend markets to their will. Top-down central planning, dictating resource allocation and industrial output based on supposedly superior knowledge of needs and wants, is an impulse that has infected political players throughout history." The result was always a conspicuous and dismal failure. Today’s central planners, especially the Federal Reserve, will encounter the same failure in time. The open issues are, when and at what cost to society?

 


Tyler Durden's picture

The 5 Faces Of Income Inequality





Whatever your position is on income inequality or the “great wealth divide,” there is little argument that it currently exists. The question is whether something should be done about it. Raising taxes on “the rich,” forced redistribution, increases in social welfare, etc. all have potentially negative economic consequences which affects everyone. There is clearly no easy solution. However, for the upcoming mid-term elections this debate will be waged to swing votes in favor of those who want to remain in political office on both sides of the aisle. This is ironic considering that the majority of those individuals are currently in the top wealth brackets in the U.S. Maybe we should just start there?

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Krugman, Who Is Paid $25,000/Month To Study Inequality, Says "Nobody Wants Us To Become Cuba"





Krugman: "There's zero evidence that the kind of extreme inequality that we have is good for economic growth. In fact, there's a lot of evidence that it is actually bad for economic growth. Nobody wants us to become Cuba." Ah yes, inequality, the same inequality that the Fed - Krugman's favorite monetary stimulus machine - has been creating at an unprecedented pace since it launched QE. Just recall: "The "Massive Gift" That Keeps On Giving: How QE Boosted Inequality To Levels Surpassing The Great Depression." So while Krugman is right in lamenting the record surge in class divide between the 1% haves and the 99% have nots, you certainly won't find him touching with a ten foot pole the root cause of America's current surge in inequality. And, tangentially, another thing you won't find him touching, is yesterday's revelation by Gawker that the Nobel laureate is the proud recipient of $25,000 per month from CUNY to... study inequality.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 17





  • Putin Doesn't Rule Out Sending Troops (WSJ)
  • Japan Cuts Economic View on Tax Rise (WSJ)
  • No "harsh weather" in Chipotle restaurants where comp store sales rose 13.4% (PR)
  • No sanctions for you: EU sanctions push on Russia falters amid big business lobbying (FT)
  • Consumer Spending on Health Care Jumps as Obamacare Takes Hold (BBG)
  • China Seen Cracking on Property Controls (BBG)
  • Google, IBM results raise questions about other tech-sector companies (Reuters)
  • California city evacuation lifted after military ordnance found (Reuters)
  • For Obama, Standoff With Moscow Jumbles Plans at Home and Abroad (WSJ)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 16





  • Ukraine Says Russia Exporting ‘Terror’ Amid Eastern Push (BBG)
  • Civil War Threat in Ukraine (Reuters)
  • China Shoe Plant Strike Disrupts Output at Nike, Adidas Supplier (BBG)
  • Mt Gox to liquidate (WSJ)
  • Ex-Co-Op Bank Chairman Charged With Cocaine Possession (BBG)
  • Goldman Sachs plans to jump-start stock-trading business (WSJ)
  • Credit Suisse first-quarter profit falls as trading tumbles (Reuters)
  • U.K. Unemployment Rate Falls to Five-Year Low (BBG)
  • Lawmakers Back High-Frequency Trade Curbs in EU Markets Law (BBG)
  • Yahoo's growth anemic as turnaround chugs along (Reuters)
  • Spain ETF Grows as Rajoy Attracts Record U.S. Investments (BBG)
 


Marc To Market's picture

Germany says Nein and Ja





A look at what German is doing and what it does not want to do. 

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Things That Make You Go Hmmm... Like Rigged Markets (All Of Them!)





While Grant Williams can’t speak for anybody else, his nearly thirty years immersed in equity, bond, and commodity markets all around the world, have shown him enough to absolutely confirm in his own mind that the markets are rigged. Not just some of them. All of them. In different ways, to be sure, but they’re all rigged. Not only are they rigged, but they are rigged in ways that beggar belief; and in many places they are rigged by the very people who ought to be responsible for stopping any rigging... Whether Bill O’Brien (or Bob Pisani) likes it or not, Michael Lewis was speaking the truth when he said the market was rigged. He was talking about US equity markets, but rigging goes much, much deeper.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Behind The Fed's Monetary Curtain: Wizards? Or Scarecrows Who "Do An Awful Lot Of Talking"





On the 'growth' side, Commercial and Industrial loans are rising at a double digit annual rate of change (although it is unclear whether this is an indication of business optimism or stress - after all, we did see a big jump in these loans leading into the last recession).  On the flip side, the bond market and the US dollar index seem to be flashing some warning signs about future growth. Simply put, the outlook for the economy is decidedly uncertain right now and we think so is the confidence in Janet Yellen. We think the more dire outcome for stocks would be if Toto fully pulled back the curtain on monetary policy and revealed it to be nothing more than a bunch clueless economists sitting in a conference room with no ability to control the economy or the markets. If US growth disappoints after all the Fed has done, how could anyone continue to view the Fed wizards as omnipotent? That would send the stock market back over the rainbow to the reality of an economy with big structural problems that can only be solved through political negotiation, something that has been notable only by its absence over – at least – the last 6 years. Are we headed back to Kansas?

 


Tyler Durden's picture

"A Triumphant Recovery"? A First-Person Perspective Of What Is Really Happening In Greece





In light of the recent "triumphant" return of Greece to the capital markets with its brand new 5 Year bond issuance (which much to the chagrin of the flippers is already trading below its breaking price), one of our Greek readers decided to provide his "on the ground" perspective on what is really happening in Greece: "I am writing you in an effort to get you to provide a more public and harsh(I mean realistic) description of what has been going on, for the past few days with relation to what’s left of my country. I doubt it will not take you long to discover its mostly spent on “political commissions” and interest payments (I’d bet only 6-7% actually flows through). I am sure you are aware that according to Greek law all political parties receive some kind of (substantial) financial support from the government budget. The government has not delivered. There are still over 900,000 people working for public and government related services, for a population of roughly 11 million. The banks still maintain negative real equity and have consistently defrauded investors over the past few years."

 


Tyler Durden's picture

All Hail The Draghi Put: The Global Bond Market Is Now Well And Truly Broken





The evil of modern central banking can nowhere better be seen than in this week’s mad stampede into $4 billion of Greek bonds. The fact is, Greece is not credit-worthy at nearly any coupon yield, but most certainly not at the 4.75% sticker that was attached to the offering. And the claim that Greece’s fiscal affairs have turned for the better is really preposterous. But none of this matters, of course, because the howling pack of money managers who scooped up the Greek debt at an oversubscribed rate of 5X were not pricing the non-credit of the former Greek state, but the promises of Mario Draghi. The very worst evil of monetary central planning is that it enables clueless politicians to believe in their own fiscal fairy tales, and to persist in the ritual can-kicking that is the scourge of central bank intoxicated politicians everywhere. In the context of its shattered economy, the Greek budget is a house of cards. Still, its current leaders, whose tenure is precarious by the day, get their turn in the spotlight to issue utterly specious pettifoggery...

 

 


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