• Steve H. Hanke
    05/04/2016 - 08:00
    Authored by Steve H. Hanke of The Johns Hopkins University. Follow him on Twitter @Steve_Hanke. A few weeks ago, the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) sprang a surprise. It announced that a...

Greece

AVFMS's picture

12 Nov 2012 – “ Show Me The Way ” (Peter Frampton, 1975)





Rather quiet. Verdict still out, whether we’ll get a real rebound or whether the last days were already the dead cat bounce, before heading lower. Periphery on the soft side, but with restricted own dynamics and trailing general Risk sentiment. Waiting. For the US to show the way. Or something to happen.

"Show Me The Way" (Bunds 1,34% unch; Spain 5,88% +7; Stoxx 2473% -0,3%; EUR 1,271 unch)

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 12





Another day another sell-off…with equity markets in Europe trending steadily lower after it was reported that the decision on Greek aid will not be taken during the Eurogroup meeting scheduled for November 12. Still, EU official said that there will be no Greek default on November 16th (EUR 4.1bln redemptions) and that this redemption is to be "factored in" decision on disbursement. Separately,  analysts at Fitch rating agency noted that while current Spain’s rating is appropriate, further action would more likely than not be to sub-investment grade. Moody’s also commented on the never-ending sovereign debt crisis today, stating that actions taken by the ECB only buying time for Euro region and that a decision on France will be communicated within a few weeks. As a result, bond and credit spreads widen further today, with SP/GE 10s spread at 450 level, which is of particular importance given that this is the level at which the LCH begins to review bonds for margin requirements. Deterioration in Italian paper was linked to next week’s supply. In turn, EUR/USD and GBP/USD trended lower, with the USD index up 0.12% at last check. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest U. Michigan Survey (Nov P), as well as macro forecasts from Philadelphia Fed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 12





  • Jefferies to be bought by Ian Cumming's Leucadia in an all-stock deal for $3.59 billion or about $17/share (WSJ)
  • FBI Scrutinized on Petraeus (WSJ)
  • Identity of second woman emerges in Petraeus' downfall (Reuters)
  • SEC staffers used government computers for personal use (Reuters)
  • Japan edges towards fifth recession in 15 years  (FT)
  • Europe Finance Chiefs Seek Greek Pact as Economy Gloom Grows (BBG)
  • Americans Say Europe Lesson Means Act Now as Austerity Will Fail (BBG) - of course it would be great if Europe had ever implemented austerity...
  • Greece battles to avert €5bn default  (FT)
  • You don't bail out the US government for nothing: No Individual Charges In Probe of J.P. Morgan (WSJ)
  • Israel Warns of Painful Response to Fire From Gaza, Syria (BBG)
  • Greece's far-right party goes on the offensive (Reuters)
  • Don’t fear fiscal cliff, says Democrat  (FT)
  • Apple Settles HTC Patent Suits Shifting From Jobs’ War (BBG)
  • Man Set on Fire in Argentina Over Debt (EFE)
  • Iraq cancels $4.2-billion weapons deal with Russia over corruption concerns (Globe and Mail)
  • An Honest Guy on Wall Street (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Sentiment: Asian Bad News Trifecta Launches Traditional Overnight Melt Up





The overnight session has so far been marked with one after another economic debacle out of Asia. First Japan announced that its Q3 GDP fell an annualized 3.5% in Q3, more than the 3.4% expected, the worst decline since last year's earthquake. The drivers were sliding exports and a collapse in consumer spending. The announcement brought on a barrage of platitudes by various Japanese officials who are shocked, shocked, that 32 years of Keynesian miracles have resulted in this horrifying outcome. Of course, everyone knows 33 years is the charm for Keynesian miracles. So much for the boosts from Japan's QE 8 aad QE 9: bring on QE 10. The pundits appear surprised now that Japan is back in a solid recession, which to us is quite surprising as well - does this mean that Japan ever exited the depression? Then China came out with an announcement that its credit growth plunged in October with Chinese banks extended CNY 505bn new yuan loans in October, down from CNY 623bn in September and less than the CNY 590 expected. The trifecta of bad news was rounded off by India, whose Industrial Production joined the rest of the world in global recession, when it dropped 0.4% in September on expectations of a 2.8% rise, even as Consumer prices rose 9.75% Y/Y - the global stagflation wave has arrived... For all those wondering why futures have managed to eek out a modest overnight ramp.

 
smartknowledgeu's picture

The REAL World Series of Poker is Going Down Right Now





The REAL World Series of Poker (WSOP) is a currency war with far greater implications and consequences for every human being on earth than the one that plays out in Las Vegas every year. Many of the Western nations' bluffs are now being exposed and falling apart.  This will have significant implications for much higher gold & silver prices in the future.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Is Democracy Possible In A Corrupt Society?





If the citizenry cannot dislodge a parasitic, predatory financial Aristocracy via elections, then "democracy" is merely a public-relations facade, a simulacra designed to create the illusion that the citizenry "have a voice" when in fact they are debt-serfs in a neofeudal State. When the Status Quo remains the same no matter who gets elected, democracy is a shamThe U.S. Status Quo is also like an iceberg: the visible 10% is what we're reassured "we" control, but the 90% that is completely out of our control is what matters. There is another dynamic in a facsimile democracy: the Tyranny of the Majority. When the Central State issues enough promises to enough people, the majority concludes that supporting the Status Quo, no matter how corrupt, venal, parasitic, unsustainable and dysfunctional it might be, is in their personal interests. In this facsimile democracy, citizenship has devolved to advocacy for a larger share of Federal government swag. Is Democracy Possible in a Corrupt Society? No, it is not. Our democracy is a PR sham.

 
testosteronepit's picture

Unintended Consequences Of Bailouts: Greece Gets Slammed





Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann: the favorite solution to the Greek crisis is legally impossible

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Preview Of The Boring Week Ahead





The upcoming week comes less loaded with policy events. The only major one is the Eurogroup meeting on Monday, however EU officials have already confirmed that no decision on the next Greek aid tranche will be made before the Troika’s next report on Greece’s adherence to the bailout conditions. Greece has scheduled an auction for Tuesday in order to roll over €3.1 bn in T-bills expiring by the end of the week. Additionally, in the US, the President has invited leadership of both parties for a first round of talks on the fiscal cliff. The data calendars also look lighter, with the publication of the FOMC minutes on Wednesday, and US Philly Fed on Thursday.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Austerity Farm: Where Cuts For Some Are More Equal Than Cuts For Others





As the Greek government voted on their austerity plans (and prepare to vote on the budget), most of the media is focused on the molotov-cocktail-throwing malarkey that is occurring outside of the parliament. However, as Reuters reports, it was the band-of-brothers inside the building that may just have sparked the largest anger among the public. The government workers, who have enjoyed the "kind of lavish pay and benefits that have become emblematic of the public sector excess at the heart of Greece's debt crisis", suddenly discovered that in the 500-page draft of cost cuts and tax hikes that they themselves were expected to share in that sacrifice. This was entirely not acceptable and thus - they walked off the job, with police having to be called to prevent the shut off of power to the parliament building. Dubbed "The Princes of Parliament", these 'unsackable' staff who have enjoyed 16-month-per-year salaries, seem happy to draft the cuts for others but when it is their own..."we will stop it... Maybe forcefully this time" is response.

 
AVFMS's picture

Shuffle Rewind 05-09 Nov " Wake Up " (Rage Against The Machine, 1992)





Well, after the Great Disconnect last week, next to the Great Pumpkin, and Sandy, we had Election week and suddenly the great Wake-Up Call. Fiscal Cliff was suddenly all the rage and ramped up equities (disconnect) were beaten flat by bonds.

"Wake Up" (Bunds 1,34% -11; Spain 5,81% +17; Stoxx 2481 -2,4%; EUR 1,271 -130)

 
Tyler Durden's picture

If The Greek Elections Were Held Today





Last week's largely symbolic vote in which the Greek bailout-addicted parliament passed, by the tiniest of margins, the latest request for just one more monetary fix promising that this time it will, pinky swear, get its house in order (and maybe even collect some taxes, because all those previous promises were just rehearsals) succeeded in one thing: the coalition government from this summer's elections, crumbling well ahead of time. Which means the time for yet another parliamentary vote is fast approaching. So if a vote were held today, who would be the most represented parties in the Greek parliament? The answer, according to the latest KAPA poll, is the following...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Gold And The Potential Dollar Endgame Part 1





Economists the world over can take comfort that the laws of supply and demand still largely rule the marketplace. However, we believe there is a noted exception for a yellow, largely useless metal. A metal that just happens to have shaped the world’s monetary systems for the last several thousand years. Gold’s “supply” traditionally defined as global mining production is virtually meaningless in determining its’ price. How can this be? Gold, even when viewed as a commodity, is unique in that it is not consumed. Rather than supply in the traditional sense, what drives the gold price is the percentage of the existing stock (170,000 tons) that is available for sale on any given day. Gold, in our opinion is what is often referred to as a Giffen good. We believe that a massive revaluation of gold denominated in dollars can happen quite suddenly, almost overnight. But not because of any sustained long term demand for gold, but simply because owners of metal simply withdraw it from sale, sending the stock to flow ratio to infinity. This is why understanding gold’s stock to flow ratio is so vital. What happens to the “price” of gold when it ceases bidding for dollars? Zero. Or infinity. Take your pick.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Meet Alex - The Real 'Not Lazy Bastard' Greek





While Mr. Panos has often been used as the poster boy for the Greek people, his shortened premise is - we will keep taking the Europeans money until they no longer want to give it to us. In the meantime, the Greek people have suffered due to the previous largesse of their government and need for a 'reversion' to the mean of their relative wealth. The following brief clip offers some insight (or defense) of who the real man-on-the-street is in Greece. Not the media's interpretation of a lazy, cheating, ungrateful, helpless, corrupt, violent, rude, racist, tax-evading, trouble-making thieving vandal - that lives with his mother; but a scapegoat for all that is wrong in Europe and remains shocked, confused, frustrated, and upset. It's someone's fault, right? Why not Alex?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Reading Between The Lines





One of the great faults with paying attention to Europe is to take what they tell you as factual. The media trumpets what they are given by the various sources of information in Europe but a quite skeptical eye is what is needed. They claim that they do not have the “Final Troika Report” on Greece because they have not stamped it “Final” yet and so they blame their indecision on the magic trick that they are performing. Everyone on the Continent has the report but since they can agree on almost nothing they have blamed the lack of the rubber stamp as the culprit. They should just come out and say that, “It is the rubber stamp’s fault” and be done with it. Every easy trick has now been exhausted when it comes to Greece. You may feel worn out and tired by the length of time this process has taken but that is a remarkably short-sighted viewpoint. It is going to be either “debt forgiveness” or “more money” or “brute force” and there are quite serious consequences for many nations and many governments whichever path is chosen. Any of these three paths will lead to extensive pain and a lot of contagion and so I conclude that the Greeks will get forced out by increasing European demands.  “Blame it on the Greeks” will be the secret password while the Greeks will call Berlin every name in the book.

 
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