Overnight Sentiment: Spanish Budget Hangover And Month End Window Dressing

Those confused by yesterday's rapid move higher in stocks, which fizzled by day's end, which was catalyzed by the non-event of the Spanish budget declaration which will prove to be a major disappointment as all such announcement are fated to be, can take solace in the following summary by DB's Jim Reid: "Yesterday's risk rally on the back of the 2013 budget announcement coincided with a trend seen over the last couple of years of rallies into month and quarter ends. We'll probably get a clearer picture of underlying sentiment by early next week with the new quarter starting, especially as it commences with a bang with the Global PMI numbers on Monday." In this vein, tonight's overnight sentiment showing weakness confirms yesterday's move was one which merely used Spain as a buying catalyst without reading anything into it. Because an even cursory read through shows major cracks. Sure enough the sellside readthroughs appeared this morning: "In our view the Spanish 2013 budget is based on a too optimistic GDP growth assumption" from Citi. Once again, the market shot first, and asks questions later, as the weakness in the futures confirms, EURUSD retracing all overnight gains, and Spain now 1.6% lower on this, as well as uncertainty of today's latest non-event - the local bank stress test vers 304.2b - whose results will be announce at noon NY time, and which just may find Bankia (and its Spiderman towel collection) is quite solvent once again.

The Financial Crisis Of 2015 - A Non-Fictional Fiction

The financial crisis of 2008 shook politicians, bankers, regulators, commentators and ordinary citizens out of the complacency created by the 25-year "great moderation". Yet, for all the rhetoric around a new financial order, and all the improvements made, many of the old risks remain (and some are far larger). The following 'story' suggests a scenario based on an 'avoidable history' and while future crises are not avoidable, being a victim of the next one is.

"John Banks was woken by his phone at 3am on Sunday 26th April 2015. John worked for Garland Brothers, a formerly British bank that had relocated its headquarters to Singapore in late 2011 as a result of..."

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard's Contrition

In a fiery article written today, Telegraph's Ambrose Evans-Pritchard unleashes a scathing critique of Europe's AAA club for daring to demand that Spain actually follow through with what they have been pretending to be doing, namely cutting spending and promoting improved government tax collections. We now know that Spain did neither, with spending increasing while tax revenues dropped from last year (and as we will not tire of pointing out, if the government has lost sight of the ball, and the economy is collapsing, it is not due to a cut in spending but due to its own inability to govern - something the people in a democratic regime usually are quite capable of fixing on their own). But complying with agreements in a broke Europe is not part of the New Normal. His summation, phrase briefly is as follows: "We discover – yet again, you might say – that Germany, Holland, and Finland will not stand behind their solemn pledge of solidarity when push comes to shove. Spain’s premier Mariano Rajoy has been betrayed. Nobody should be entirely surprised if he and the Spanish arch-nationalists in his circle offer a condign riposte, and bring down the entire temple on the heads of the creditor powers." Of course, none of that is true, and what Germany, Holland and Finland are doing is doing their best to get dragged into the money pit that the rest of their insolvent socialist neighbors can so efficiently dug in the last several years.  What the article really is, is simply Ambrose's contrition for misreading the balance of power in Europe. Like so many others, he was all too eager to swallow the misdirection narrative that as a result of Mario Monti's stubborn gambit at the June 27th Euro-summit, the balance of power had finally shifted from the exporting, rich and quite solvent nations, to their liquidity and bailout addicted neighbors, something we claimed all along was a major mistake.

AVFMS's picture

In absence of really negative news, outside the heavier macro / sentiment data, the lukewarm Italian auction and US data, markets remained on a slight tentative rebound.

Will need to await further details and overnight analysis of the Spanish budget. Lots of reforms...

Hmm, and in how much time can all that be passed - if at all???

Cashin Concerned On Europe But Egyptian Streets Worry Him More

European riots protests are on UBS' Art Cashin's mind. Furthermore, Art notes that Spain has seen a fifth region (Castilla La Mancha) request a billion-euro-bailout (along with Catalonia's secession concerns) and Greece is hotting up. However, it is Egypt that is becoming an increasing concerning for the avuncular aristocrat of the exchange floor, as he fears the region's growing instability along with its potential need to devalue the pound may see the current 'sporadic outbursts of social unrest' spill over into more broad based protestations on the streets of Cairo.

"Not Counted" Does Not Mean "Not There"

The ECB has $15 trillion in loans outstanding to Europe. They claim a $4 trillion balance sheet based upon not counting guaranteed loans by various nations and by not counting contingent liabilities. This is the same scheme that is used for calculating the debt to GDP ratios of the countries in Europe. If a loan, a debt, is guaranteed by a nation or if the liability is “contingent;” it is not counted. This, of course, does not mean that possibility of having to fund or write-off something is not there; it just means it is not counted. Do not disregard or minimize the recent announcement by Germany, Finland and the Netherlands that was joined twenty-four hours later by Austria. The funding nations in Europe placed a line in the concrete when they rejected assisting legacy issues and loans. This group of nations vacated, in this one statement, all of the pleas and demands of the periphery countries that had lined up for aid and ever-more aid relying upon the pledges of the solidarity of Europe and they got an answer, a very Germanic answer which is not, I am quite sure, what they wanted to hear.

Frontrunning: September 27

  • Madrid Protesters March Again as Spain Braces for Cuts (Bloomberg)
  • Euro Can Bear Fewer Members as Czech Leader Calls Greeks Victims (Bloomberg)
  • Chinese Industrial Profits Fall 6.2% in Fifth Straight Drop (Bloomberg)
  • China pours $58bn into money markets (FT)
  • Beijing vows more measures on Diaoyu Islands (China Daily)
  • Noda vows no compromise as Japan, China dig in on islands row (Reuters)
  • Politico’s Paul Ryan Satire: The Joke’s on Them (Bloomberg)
  • Electoral Drama Shifts to Ohio (WSJ)
  • German opposition party targets banks (FT)
  • Fed action triggers fear of new currency wars (FT)
  • Ex-Credit Suisse CDO Boss Serageldin Is Arrested in U.K. (Bloomberg)
  • Romney ‘I Dig It’ Trust Gives Heirs Triple Benefit (Bloomberg)

Overnight Sentiment Better As China Joins Global Easing Fest... Sort Of

After seeing its stock market tumbling to fresh 2009 lows, the PBOC decided it couldn't take it any more, and joined the Fed's QE3 and the BOJ's QE8 (RIP) in easing. Sort of. Because while the PBOC is prevented from outright easing as we have been saying for months now (even as "experts" screamed an RRR or outright rate cut is imminent every day while we warned that Chinese inflation has proven quite sticky especially in home prices and food and China's central bank will not attempt to push its stocks up as long as the situation persists, so for quite a while) it can inject liquidity on a ultra-short term basis using reverse repos (or what are called repos here in the US). And shortly after it was found that Chinese companies industrial profits fell 6.2% in August after tumbling 5.4% in July, we learned that the PBOC added a record 365 billion Yuan to the financial system in order to prevent a creeping lockup in the banking system. While this managed to push the Shanghai Composite by nearly 3% overnight, this injection will prove meaningless in even the medium-term as the liquidity is now internalized and the PBOC has no choice but to add ever more liquidity or face fresh post-2009 lows every single day. Which it won't as very soon it will seep over into the broader market. And as long as the threat of surging pork prices next year is there, and with a global bacon shortage already appearing, and food prices set to surge in a few short months on the delayed effects of the US drought, one thing is certain: China will need a rumor that someone- even Spain- is coming to its rescue.

Meanwhile, At The Greece 'Mass Strike' Protest-Cam

Tens of thousands of Greeks are in the streets (according to various media and livestreams - expected to grow to 100,000) and what was a peaceful (though loud) protest against the 'criminal TROIKA' appears to have begun sporadically to turn a little ugly as police are organizing and smoke (believed to be tear gas and petrol bombs being exchanged) is seen in the Square. The live-stream shows hundreds of riot police as the protesters begin to arrive in the main Square.

European Risk Is Back: CDS Surge, Spain 10 Year Back Over 6%, Germany Has Second Uncovered Auction In Three Weeks

Remember when we said two months ago that one way or another the market will need to tumble to enforce the chain of events that lead to Spain demanding the bailout which has long been priced in, and (especially after yesterday's violent protest) Rajoy handing in his resignation? Well, it's "another." After nearly 3 months of suspending reality, in hopes to not "rock the boat" until the US presidential election, reality has made a quick and dramatic appearance in Europe, where after a day in which the EURUSD tumbled, events overnight have finally caught up. What happened? First, ECB's Asmussen said that the central bank would not participate in any debt restructuring, confirming any and all hopes that the ECB would ever be pari passu with regular bondholders were a pipe dream. Second, Plosser in the US said additional QE probably won't boost growth which has reverberated across a globe in which the only recourse left is, well, additional QE. Finally, pictures of tens of thousands rioting unemployed young men and women in Madrid did not help. The result: Spain's 10 Year is over 20 bps wider, and back over 6%, Germany just had a €5 billion 10 Year auction for which it only got €3.95 billion in bids, which means it was technically a failure, and the second uncovered auction in one month, and finally CDS across the continent, not to mention the option value that is the Spanish IBEX which may fall 3% today, have finally realized they are priced far too much to perfection and have, as a result, blown out.