Greece

Europe Refuses To Be Fixed

It seems like it was only 24 hours ago that Europe bailed out Greece for the third time and everything was "fixed", with a resultant desperate attempt to validate this by pushing the EURUSD above 1.3000. Sadly, as always happens, Europe, and especially Greece, refuses to be fixed, because as we will not tire of saying: you can't fix debt with i) more debt, ii) hockeystick projections or iii) soothing words of platitude and an outright bankruptcy, just like that which Argentina is about to undergo, will be needed. If that means the end of the EUR and the delusion that the Eurozone is a viable monument to the egos of a few technocratic career politicians, so be it. As a result, this time around the halflife of the latest bailout was precisely zero, as was that of the latest Japanese QE episode, as the entire world is now habituated to the lies emanating from Europe, and demands details, which in turn are sorely lacking, especially as relates to the question of just where will Greece get the money desperately needed to fund the Greek bond buyback. But at least Kathimerini was kind enough to advise readers that said buyback must take place by December 7 in time for the euroarea finmins to approve the payment of the next Greek loan tranche at the December 13 meeting, something which will likely not happen, especially if Germany's SPD party delays the vote on the Greek bailout until the end of December as was reported yesterday. We can't wait to learn the details of the buyback package, which will come in the "next few days" per ANA, and especially where the buyback money will come from, especially with the FT reporting that various European countries will already lose money next year on the latest Greek bailout.

Guest Post: We're Heading For Economic Dictatorship

We are all now members of the Permanent No-growth Club. And the United States has just re-elected a president who seems determined to sign up too. No government in what used to be called “the free world” seems prepared to take the steps that can stop this inexorable decline. They are all busily telling their electorates that austerity is for other people (France), or that the piddling attempts they have made at it will solve the problem (Britain), or that taxing “the rich” will make it unnecessary for government to cut back its own spending (America). So here we all are. Like us, the member nations of the European single currency have embarked on their very own double (or is it triple?) dip recession. This is the future: the long, meandering “zig-zag” recovery to which the politicians and heads of central banks allude is just a euphemism for the end of economic life as we have known it. Democratic socialism with its “soft redistribution” and exponential growth of government spending will have paved the way for the hard redistribution of diminished resources under economic dictatorship.

Burkhardt's picture

Just maybe the Greek bailout saga is drawing to a close. While markets set expectations, we now move towards the true impact of what this final deal will do for both Greece and the EU as a whole. Moral hazard is set to be released again, and we get a chance to glimpse the true impact…

 

AVFMS's picture

Ok. It’s not that the Greek deal is nothing. But then again, third strike. Eventually expected, or at least hoped for. Hence, lack of concrete follow-through. So, now it’s there. And now what? You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet? What is there to see??? Pitch the markets some input, something concrete, something to feed off, something to see!

"You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet" (Bunds 1,43% +2; Spain 5,51% -9; Stoxx 2538 -0,2%; EUR 1,293 -30)

The Fairy Tale

No funds are going to be distributed now. Perhaps some of you missed this but this is exactly what Ms. Lagarde stated. Before any distribution the Eurozone has to “fulfill its commitments” and the Private Sector bond buyback plan must be completed. Consider this; Europe is putting up all of the money currently and the IMF has declined to participate. Oh yes, it is couched in political mishmash and tucked neatly under the rug but there it is; no money from the IMF for now.

CME Declares Force Majeure Due To “Operational Limitations” On NYC Gold Depository

CME Group declared a force majeure at one of its New York precious metals depositories yesterday, run by bullion dealer and major coin dealer Manfra, Tordella and Brooks (MTB), due to “operational limitations” posed by Hurricane Sandy. MTB has “operational limitations” following Hurricane Sandy and can’t load gold bullion, platinum bullion or palladium bullion, CME Group Inc., the parent of the Comex and New York Mercantile Exchange, said today in a statement. MTB must provide holders with metal at Brinks Inc. in New York to meet current outstanding warrants in relevant delivery periods with compensation for costs, Chicago-based CME said. The CME said that MTB will not be able to deliver metal as the lower Manhattan company deals with "operational limitations" almost a month after the arrival of Hurricane Sandy. MTB is one of five depositories licensed to deliver gold against CME's benchmark 100-troy ounce gold contract, held 29,276 troy ounces of gold and 33,000 troy ounces of palladium as of Nov. 23, according to data from CME subsidiary Comex. In a notice to customers on Monday, CME declared force majeure for the facility, a contract clause that frees parties from liability due to an event outside of their control.

Frontrunning: November 27

  • OECD slashes 2013 growth forecast (FT)
  • Fiscal Cliff Compromise Elusive as Congress Returns (Bloomberg)
  • China’s PBOC Chief Search Spurs Focus on Finance Regulators (Bloomberg)
  • Elected, but Still Campaigning (WSJ)
  • Pentagon Readies Options for Afghanistan Force After 2014 (Bloomberg)
  • Greece Wins Easier Debt Terms as EU Hails Rescue Formula (Bloomberg)
  • Monti presses Cameron for EU referendum (FT)
  • Welcome, Mr Carney – Britain needs you (FT)
  • Argentina seeks halt to $1.3bn debt order (FT)
  • Asean chief warns on South China Sea disputes (FT)
  • South Korea Tightens FX Rules to Temper Won Surge (WSJ)

Europe's Latest Can-Kicking Euphoria Fading Quick

It wouldn't be Europe if the insolvent continent did not announce, to much pomp and circumstance, another final rescue for a broke country which was nothing but a short-termist can kicking exercise. It also wouldn't be Europe if the leaders did not do much if any math when coming up with said "rescue", and it certainly wouldn't be Europe if the initial EURphoria following such an announcement was not promptly faded. Sure enough, all three have now occurred with the EURUSD soaring to over 1.3000 in the moments after last night's soon to be obsolete announcement, only to see a gradual and consistent sell off over the next several hours, dropping to a week low of just under 1.2940 as details emerged that... there were not details. To wit, as Market News reported:

  • EU COMMISSION: FUNDING FOR GREECE DEBT BUYBACK NOT WORKED OUT YET

In other words, the use of funds for the third Greek bailout has been more than detailed. The only tiny outstanding issue - the source of funds.

Greece Kicks The Can For The Third Time - SocGen's Take: "More Will Be Needed"

It took the charming three tries for Greece to get its third "bailout", which incidentally does not bail out anyone except the hedge funds who went long GGBs because the only actual winners resulting from yesterday's transaction - those benefiting from Europe's AAA club fund flows are hedge funds as explained previously. As for Greece, what the "deal" did was buy it more time to get its hockeystick GDP forecast in order as the only thing that may win the country some future debt forgiveness is hitting an unbelievable 4%+ current account surplus and GDP growth of a ridiculous 4.5% per year. That said, of the cash proceeds going to Greece, to be released in three tranches, totaling €43.7 billion, only a de minimis €10.6bn for budgetary financing, i.e., the Greek population (read government corruption) and €23.8bn in EFSF bonds for bank recapitalisation, read keeping German and French banks solvent. Once the €10.6 billion runs out in a few months, the strikes will resume. So what does this third, latest, greatest and certainly not last can kicking exercise mean? Simple: in the words of SocGen, a short-term reprieve has been hard bought, nothing has been fixed, and "more will be likely."

Mark Grant On Greece: "There Is No Deal Here"

There is no deal here. There is a fantasy of projections and some wishful thinking but no deal. There is not even an agreement on disbursement as codified in the last paragraph of the statement (here). The odds on Greece reaching a primary surplus in the next several years are about 1 degree off of Kelvin's Absolute Zero. There is not even a definitive agreement yet to give Greece more money. What we have here are more promises, a concocted ruse and an agreement on a concept that is actually no deal at all. What we have here is one more "huff and puff" and no agreement by any definition that we suspect anyone (aside from self-referential European bankers) would find acceptable. After EURUSD's initial 'headline'-driven surge, it is fading now.

We Have A New New New Greek Deal - Full Details And Live Webcast

The words commitment, support, hard-work, and reform are popular among these talking heads. Here are the details and the press conference - though do NOT try and use your calculator.

As Lagarde adds: "The initiatives include Greek debt buybacks, return of Securities Market Programme (SMP) profits to Greece, reduction of Greek Loan Facility (GLF) interest rates, significant extension of GLF and European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) maturities, and the deferral of EFSF interest rate payments."