Greece

Tyler Durden's picture

Greek "Hell" Remains After Athens Uses Creditor Money To Repay Creditors





As we showed before when we showed the various Greek circle of debt hell, unless Greece finds a way to access the market once again following its "triumphal return" in mid-2014 when it issued bonds that cost investors (with other people's money) their 2015 bonus, it is only then that the Greek debt repayment hell begins.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Treasuries Are Dumping After Bullard's "September More Likely" Rate Hike Comments





Overnight we saw a flush in precious metals, with no apparent catalyst, and now we are seeing US Treasuries extreme volatility as earlier strength extending gains from last week, are unceremoniously and suddenly dumped after Fed's Bullard warned markets that the probability of a September rate hike is now above 50%. Of course, thanks to meltups pre-market in FB, GOOG, and AAPL, stock indices don't care at all.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 20





  • Gold Plunges to Lowest Since 2010 (BBG)
  • In Greek crisis, one big unhappy EU family (Reuters)
  • Greek Banks Reopen Their Doors (WSJ)
  • Greek reshuffle hints at autumn election (FT)
  • Angela Merkel signals conditions for Greek debt talks (FT)
  • Dollar hits three-month high on rate view, pans gold (Reuters)
  • History Shows Iran Could Surprise the Oil Market (BBG)
  • ‘Charlie Hebdo’ Will Cease Publishing Cartoons of Prophet Muhammad (Newsweek)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Levitate After Greek Creditors Repay Themselves; Commodities Tumble To 13 Year Low





Today's action is so far an exact replica of Friday's zero-volume ES overnight levitation higher (even if Europe's derivatives market, the EUREX exchange, did break at the open for good measure leading to a delayed market open just to make sure nobody sells) with the "catalyst" today being the official Greek repayment to both the ECB and the IMF which will use up €6.8 billion of the €7.2 billion bridge loan the EU just handed over Athens so it can immediately repay its creditors. In other words, Greek creditors including the ECB, just repaid themselves once again. One thing which is not "one-time" or "non-recurring" is the total collapse in commodities, which after last night's precious metals flash crash has sent the Bloomberg commodity complex to a 13 year low.

 
Monetary Metals's picture

Monetary Metals Supply and Demand Report 19 July, 2015





Greece. China. Banking system messes. Central bank printing. And here we are, under $1140. Breakdown?

That cannot be determined from price charts. We want to know the fundamentals of supply and demand. Here's how we measure it.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"The Streets Of Athens Will Fill With Tanks": Kathimerini Reveals Grexit "Black Book" Shocker





"If this plan is implemented, the streets of Athens will sound the tracks of tanks"...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Concentrated Wealth + Widespread Stupidity = End Of Democracy





This is how democracy has died in America. The formula is simple: billionaires + their (and their many clergy’s) suckers = aristocracy. The result is, in any case, an aristocratic dictatorship, no sort of authentic democracy whatsoever. And, when even the Democratic candidate has gotten there by a string of lies and no substantive record on which voters can know that his assertions don’t match his real beliefs or commitments, the voters are trapped by the aristocracy: they’ve got nothing else to go on but the aristocracy’s lies, and the aristocratically owned ‘news’ media’s stenographic transmissions of their politicians’ lies to the public. The American Revolution (1765-83) overthrew Britain’s aristocracy here. But now, the American people need to overthrow America’s own aristocracy, or else simply accept fascism (rule by an aristocracy).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Australia The Next Greece?





Australian consumers are more worried about the medium term outlook than at the peak of the financial crisis, and rightfully so. As The Telegraph reports, by the end of the first quarter this year, Australia’s net foreign debt had climbed to a record $955bn, equal to an already unsustainable 60pc of gross domestic product, and is set to rise as RBA's bet that depreciation in the value of the country’s currency would help to offset the decline in its overbearing mining industry hasn’t happened to the extent they would have wished. Furthermore, as UBS explains, China's real GDP growth cycles have become an increasingly important driver of Australia's nominal GDP growth this last decade. With iron ore and coal prices plumbing new record lows, a Chinese (real) economy firing on perhaps 1 cyclinder, and equity investors reeling from China's collapse; perhaps the situation facing Australia is more like Greece than many want to admit, as Gina Rinehart, Australia’s richest woman and matriarch of Perth’s Hancock mining dynasty stunned her workers this week: accept a 10% pay cut or face redundancies.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

French President Calls For The Creation Of United States Of Europe





French President Francois Hollande said that the 19 countries using the euro need their own government complete with a budget and parliament to cooperate better and overcome the Greek crisis. “Circumstances are leading us to accelerate,” Hollande said in an opinion piece published by the Journal du Dimanche on Sunday. “What threatens us is not too much Europe, but a lack of it.”... Countries in favor of more integration should move ahead, forming an “avant-garde,” Hollande said.

 
Capitalist Exploits's picture

Can You Hear the Fat Lady Singing? - Part I





Why Greece is simply a symptom of a much larger problem

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Portugal’s Debts Are (Also) Unsustainable





Everyone seems to be focusing on Greece these days – a country so indebted that it needs even more loans to repay just a fraction of its gigantic credits. Clearly this is unsustainable and something has to give. Even the IMF agrees. But what about the other Southern European countries? Actually, Portugal’s financial situation is looking particularly shaky, and any hiccups could have serious cross-border repercussions from Madrid all the way to Berlin.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Long Lines Expected As Greek Banks Risk "Cautious" Reopening





"Greek banks expect long queues ... when they reopen on Monday for the first time in three weeks, although withdrawals will still be limited and capital controls will remain," Reuters reports, adding that "Greeks will be able to withdraw 420 euros a week at once instead of just 60 euros a day". Clearly, this is about managing perception. The only way that €420 per week is different than €60 per day is that it will front-load the bank queues on Mondays and thus create a false impression of calm throughout the remainder of the week. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Which Is A Bigger "Act Of Faith" - Owning Gold Or Stocks?





The WSJ has released yet another gold hit piece calling it a "pet rock' and gold bugs "subjects of a laboratory experiment on the psychology of cognitive dissonance" just one day after the PBOC reveals it has added the biggest amount of gold in history in order to "ensure security." But the biggest irony is that none other than Citigroup made a far bolder case that it is not the ownership of gold but of stocks that is the ultimate act of faith: "investors remain united in their faith in the central banks – if not for their ability to create growth, then at least in their ability to push up asset prices. And yet the limits of that faith are increasingly on display." So who is right?

 
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