Gross Domestic Product

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: January 16





  • Jon Huntsman Will Leave Republican Presidential Race, Endorse Mitt Romney, Officials Say (WaPo)
  • Dont laugh - Plosser: Fed Tightening Possible Before Mid-2013 (WSJ)
  • Greece’s Creditors Seek End To Deadlock (FT)
  • France Can Overcome Crisis With Reforms – Sarkozy (Reuters)
  • Nowotny Says S&P Favors Fed’s Bond Buying Over ECB’s ‘Restrictive’ Policy (Bloomberg)
  • Bomb material found in Thailand after terror warnings (Reuters)
  • Ma Victory Seen Boosting Taiwan Markets as Baer Considers Upgrading Stocks (Bloomberg)
  • Japan Key Orders Jump; Policymakers Fret over Euro (Reuters)
  • Renminbi Deal Aims to Boost City Trade (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Hedge Funds Now Hold Future Of Europe Hostage





Payback sure is a bitch. After being demonized for everything from the tiniest tick down in the EURUSD, to blowing out spreads in CDS, to plunging stocks across the insolvent continent, hedge funds, long falsely prosecuted for everything, even stuff they patently did not do, are about to have their day in the sun, precisely in the manner we predicted back in June of last year when we posted: "Greek Bailout #2 Is Dead On Arrival: A Few Good Hedge Funds May Have Called The ECB's Bluff, And Hold The Future Of The EUR Hostage." Back then we wrote: "we may suddenly find ourselves in the biggest "activist" investor drama, in which voluntary restructuring "hold out" hedge funds will settle for Cheapest to Delivery or else demand a trillion pounds of flesh from the ECB in order to keep the eurozone afloat. In other words, the drama is about to get very, very real. And, most ironically, a tiny David is about to flip the scales on the mammoth Goliath of the ECB and hold the entire European experiment hostage..." Sure enough, we were right yet again. Ekathimerini writes: "Hedge funds are taking on the powerful International Monetary Fund over its plan to slash Greece's towering debt burden as time runs out on the talks that could sway the future of Europe's single currency. The funds have built up such a powerful positions in Greek bonds that they could derail Europe's tactic of getting banks and other bondholders to share the burden of reducing the country's debt on a voluntary basis." Oh no, they will let it happen, but first Europe will pay, with real interest, for every single incident of hedge fund bashing and abuse over the past 2 years. We estimate the final tally, to US taxpayer mind you, will be about $20 billion, to remove the "nuisance factor" of hold out hedge funds. Congratulations Europe - you have proven to be a continent full of idiot "leaders" once again.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Germany Issues Bills With Negative Yields As Economists Agree Country Is In Recession





Continuing the schizoid overnight theme, we look at Germany which just sold €3.9 billion in 6 month zero-coupon Bubills at a record low yield of -0.0122% (negative) compared to 0.001% previously. The bid to cover was 1.8 compared to 3.8 before. As per the FT: "German short-term debt has traded at negative yields in the secondary market for some weeks with three-month, six-month and one-year debt all below zero. Bills for six-month debt hit a low of minus 0.3 per cent shortly after Christmas...The German auction marks the start of another busy week of debt sales across Europe. France and Slovakia are also selling bills on Monday, with Austria and the Netherlands selling bonds on Tuesday. Germany will auction five-year bonds on Wednesday, while Thursday sees sales of Spanish bonds and Italian bills. Italy finishes the week with a sale of bonds on Friday." Still the fact that the ECB deposit facility, already at a new record as pointed out previously, is not enough for banks to parks cash is grounds for alarm bells going off: the solvency crisis in Europe is not getting any easier, confirmed by the implosion of UniCredit which is down now another 11% this morning and down nearly 50% since the atrocious rights offering announced last week. On this background Germany continues to be a beacon of stability, yet even here the consensus is that recession has arrived. As Bild writes, according to a bank economist survey, Germany's economy is expected to shrink in Q1, with wage increases remaining below 3%. And as deflation grips the nation, potentially unleashing the possibility for direct ECB monetization, look for core yields to continue sliding lower, at least on the LTRO-covered short end.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

2012 Will Mark the End of the Euro






European nations need to roll over hundreds of billions if not trillions of Euros’ worth of debt in 2012. And this is at a time when even more solvent members such as France and Germany are staging weak and failed auctions.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Spain Releases Another Stunner: Deficit Could Be Greater Than 8% Of GDP





One of the biggest headlines that floated under the radar late last week was the announcement by Spain that its budget deficit would soar well higher than the expected 6% of economic output and instead be at 8% of GDP, which while ignored by the broader media was certainly noted by the EURUSD which tumbled on the news. Probably the most humorous response came from the neo-feudal viceroy of the PIIGS Olli Rehn who was displeased. From Reuters: "The European Commission regretted missed fiscal targets announced in Spain on Friday, but hailed the government's announcement of an austerity plan intended to slash the Spanish public deficit. "I regret the sizable fiscal slippage" to a deficit of 8.0 percent of GDP instead of 6.0 percent initially targeted, Economic Affairs Commissioner Olli Rehn said, while welcoming the new measures announced from Madrid." We in turn regret that a year after adopting so-called austerity, Spain still has not understood that it means cutting the deficit, not blowing it up. Because just like in Greece, sooner or later the Germans will come knocking and demanding every last shred of sovereign independence from its bevy of debt/bailout slaves. Unfortunately today's news will not help: in another piece of news that many hope slip under the low volume radar, the government just said that the revised number could well be re-revised even worse as soon as a few days later.

 
ilene's picture

Stock World Weekly: Sound and Fury





While we’re not bubbling over with optimism, we believe the New Year will be anything but boring. 

 
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