Gross Domestic Product

Tyler Durden's picture

Beijing's Tepid Efforts To Slow The Credit Boom Are Springing Giant Leaks





China is a case of bastardized socialism on credit steroids. At the turn of century it had $1 trillion of credit market debt outstanding—-a figure which has now soared to $25 trillion. The plain fact is that no economic system can remain stable and sustainable after undergoing a 25X debt expansion in a mere 14 years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Nordea Warns Of EU Recession And $150 Oil If Russia Retaliates





Oil prices have increased recently as tension in Ukraine has escalated and raised concerns about the risks of disruption in Russian energy exports. There is a risk that the security situation in the east Ukraine will worsen even further ahead of the 25 May elections. As Nordea notes, Russia is as important an oil exporter to Europe (of both crude and refined products) as it is a gas exporter, and the consequences of a cut in Russian oil supplies could be as grave since the global oil market has little back-up capacity to lean on. As a result, a halt in the oil deliveries from Russia to Europe will spark a sharp spike in oil prices (potentially to $150/bbl) and in a worst case scenario an oil crisis and European recession (and major slowdown in global growth) and US shale oil or an SPR release will prevent the spike.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Leaked Recording Reveals True State Of Chinese Housing Market





A leaked recording by the vice-chairman of Vanke Group (China’s biggest property developer), confirms, as The Telegraph's Amrbose Evans-Protchard reports, what the bears have been saying for months, 'it is a dangerous bubble, and already deflating'. Mao Daqing's words, translated, are ominous: "In 1990, Tokyo’s total land value accounts for 63.3% of US GDP, while Hong Kong reached 66.3% in 1997. Now, the total land value in Beijing is 61.6% of US GDP, a dangerous level... China has reached its capacity limit for new construction of residential projects... and I don’t see any possibility for a rise in home prices." The simple chart below highlights all one needs to know - inventory is exploding - and as Mao concludes: "housing production per 1000 people reached 35; even when the housing market is hot, no country has a figure of greater than 14 - this should cause alarm."

 
testosteronepit's picture

The Last Two Times This Happened, The Stock Market Crashed





It happened in 2000 and 2007. Spectacular consequences! Now it happened again. And beneath the blue-chip highs, parts of the market are already crashing.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Q1 GDP Takes Another Hit As Factory Orders Miss





Yesterday it was construction spending that took the positive shine off a measly Q1 GDP print and today it is New Factory Orders. A mere 1.1% gain MoM, missing expectations of a 1.5% bounce (and down from a 1.5% rise in February) suggest anything but a post-weather bounce in the economy. This is the 4th miss in the last 5 months and missed even with a huge spike in defense spending (+21.5%). Who will be first to lower Q1 GDP final expectations today?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Previewing Today's Nonfarm Payrolls Number: The Key Things To Look For





  • UBS 180K
  • HSBC 195K
  • Bank of America 215K
  • JP Morgan 220K
  • Goldman Sachs 220K
  • Citigroup 225K
  • Deutsche Bank 240K
  • Barclays 250K
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Stock Market Bulls Should Hope Interest Rates Don't Rise





"Everybody knows interest rates are going to rise." Whether you agree with this premise, or not, is largely irrelevant to this discussion. The current "bullish" mantra is the "great bond bull market is dead, long live the stock market bull." However, is that really the case? When the bond bubble ends this means that bonds will begin to decline, potentially rapidly, in price driving interest rates higher. This is the worst thing that could possible happen.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Santelli: "'Things Would Get Done' If It Wasn't For The Fed"





Reflecting on the divergence between equities at all time-highs and drastically sliding bond yields, CNBC's Rick Santelli reminds that it seems bonds recognize that business cycles work in "fits and starts" and not in straight-lines as some (equity bulls) would believe and reminds (as we noted previously) that with revisions, Q1 GDP could be negative. His discussion moves from US Treasury 'cheapness' relative to global bonds and the 'weather' effect's over-exuberant expectations; but it is his final topic that raised an eyebrow or two. Santelli doesn't buy into the meme that "the reason the Fed is doing all this is because Congress does nothing;" in fact, he exhorts, it's the opposite, if the Fed wasn't hunkered down supporting the stock market - and stocks started throwing little hissy fits (a la TARP), it would send signals... and things would get done!"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

What $1.4 Trillion In QE Buys The US Economy





Back in December of 2012, the Fed, after two and a half failed attempts to stimulate the economy (via QE1, QE2 and Operation Twist), announced Open-Ended QE of an indefinite injection of $85 billion per month (which it currently is tapering at a pace of $10 billion per month on the realization that it has soaked up virtually all high quality collateral). Since then the Fed's balance sheet has grown from $2.9 trillion to $4.3 trillion: a direct injection of $1.4 trillion in liquidity into the stock market, if not so much the economy, which as Wall Street is suddenly busy telling us following the latest disappointing construction spending data (the same Wall Street which initially expected Q1 GDP to be 2.75%), probably contracted for the first time in three years!

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Markets Just Sounded the Death Knell For QE





The Central Bank intervention fiasco continues to unravel before our eyes.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks Rally As Bond Yields Plunge To 10-Month Lows





You can't keep a rigged market down... despite weak GDP, weak jobs data, weaker PMI sub-indices, and weak construction spending, US equity markets are making new highs led by the ever-squeezable Nasdaq playing catch-up (and the Trannies). All of this stands in stark contrast to the continuing collapse in bond yields as macro fundamentals are reflected in only one side of the capital markets. 30Y yields - at 4.42% - are near their lowest in 10 months, and the rest of the complex hovers near 2014 lows.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

In Which We Learn That US GDP Actually Contracted In The First Quarter





Curious why after inexplicably turning red earlier today (because as everyone knows in the New Normal selling is largely forbidden and the Caracas stock market is the model to imitation), the DJIA is about to turn green again and press on new all time record highs? Simple. Following the earlier disastrous construction spending report which feeds directly into the GDP calculation, banks promptly revised their Q1 GDP estimates. To negative.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Manufacturing ISM Rises, Beats On Pick Up In Employment





With the Chicago PMI yesterday beating wildly, the whisper expectation today, in a world in which baffle with BS is the dominant strategy (aside for "hope" of course), that the manufacturing ISM would be a modest miss. It wasn't, and instead while consensus expected the April ISM to rise from 53.7 to 54.3, the final print instead ended up being 54.9, with an increase reported in most indexes, except for Production, Prices and and Order Backlogs. Ahead of tomorrow's NFP, the increase in employment by 3.6 points from 51.1 to 54.7 is notable. Finally, with exports rising only 1.5% compared to the 3.5% increase in imports, the trade component of Q2 GDP is not looking like it is improving much.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

US PMI Job Creation Slowest Since January, Says "Growth Rate Of The Economy Has Weakened Since Late Last Year"





From Markit: "Although GDP may bounce back in the second quarter, the updated manufacturing numbers are not strong enough to offset the softer trend in the flash services PMI, suggesting that the underlying growth rate of the economy has weakened since late last year. The manufacturing sector continues to benefit from rising domestic demand, but weak overseas demand continues to mean export performance disappoints, with only modest growth of new export orders recorded again in April."

 

 
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