High Yield

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Carl Icahn: "The Fed Turned This Market Around Here"





"The Fed is really holding the market up.... The Fed turned this market around here because it let it be known that the Fed funds rate isn't going to be raised in March. I am concerned about the high yield market, I think that's in a major bubble, but nobody knows when it's gonna burst." - Carl Icahn

 
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Futures Fail To Rebound On Third US Ebola Case, Continuing Crude Bloodbath





For the fourth consecutive night, futures attempted to storm higher, and were halted in their tracks when the USDJPY failed to rebound from the recalibrated 107 tractor beam, following a statement by the BOJ's former chief economist and executive director (until March 2013) who said that now is the time for the Bank of Japan to begin tapering. Needless to say, there could be no worse news to bailout and liquidity-addicted equities as the last thing a global rigged market can sustain now that QE is about to end in two weeks, is the BOJ also reducing its liquidity injections in the fungible world. This promptly took away spring in the ES' overnight bounce. Not helping matters is the continuing selloff in oil, which as we reported first yesterday, has hit the most oversold levels ever, is not helping and we can only imagine the margin calls the likes of Andy Hall and other commodity funds (ahem Bridgewater -3% in September due to "commodities") are suffering. But the nail in the coffin of the latest attempt by algos to bounce back was the news which hit two hours ago that a second Ebola case has been confirmed in Texas, and just as fears that the worst is over, had started to dissipate.

 
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Trannies Surge, Industrials Purge As Oil Plunges Most In 2 Years





Yet again, early exuberance in stocks - which was entirely unsupported by credit and bonds - plunged back to reality late in the day. Intraday volatility in Russell and Trannies was unbelievable with 3-4% swings (Trannies best day in 14 months before the tumble - but managed to close back above its 200DMA). Since Friday, Treasury yields are 6-9bps lower and the dollar rallied back to unchanged today. The big story was the total collapse in oil prices into their close (accompanied by weakness in CAD and EUR, stocks, and bond strength) as it appears someone large got a serious tap on the shoulder to liquidate (WTI under $82 -4.4%, biggest drop in 2 years). Copper gained as gold and silver slipped modestly on the day. HY credit pushed back above 400bps (widest in 13 months) as VIX broke above 24.5 briefly in the last hour (from below 21.5 at its lows) highest since June 2012.

 
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30 Year Auction Closes With Small Tail At Lowest Yield Since May 2013





If yesterday's 10 Year auction was very weak, despite the market reaction post the Fed minutes ramping the paper to highs not seen since last May, moments ago the Treasury concluded this week's auctions by selling another $13 billion in the August 30-Year reopening, in another relatively weak issue, which priced at 3.74%, a small 0.2 bps tail to the 3.72% When Issued. In any event, the high yield of just over 3% was the lowest since the May 2013 Taper Tantrum freak out. As a reference, the lowest the 30 Year has sold at auction was 2.58% in July 2012 at the peak of the European debt crisis and just before Draghi uttered the magic words "whatever it takes." The internals were also somewhat weak, with the Bid To Cover dropping from 2.67 to 2.404, just below the 2.44 TTM. And yet, unlike yesterday's 10 Year when the Direct takedown crashed to multi-year lows, today's Direct allotment was a decent 21.5%, well above the recent average, and in line with some of the higher Direct bids in recent years.

 
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Very Weak 10 Year Auction; Absence Of Bill Gross Means Lowest Directs Since August 2012





The most surprising data point in today's 10 Year auction was the plunge in Directs, which tumbled from 13.5% to only 6.6%, which was the lowest since August of 2012 when they ended up with 5.2%. Just how much of this lack of Direct interest is due to Bill Gross no longer being on the bid? And what happens to future auctions in a world without the Old "New Normal" Pimco?

 
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The Irony Of Bubbles





The one market seemingly everyone "knows" is a bubble is the treasury market. That is the market that just made new low yields on the 30 year bond for the year. GTAT, which is the first true "jump to default" I have ever seen looks exactly like a "bubble" popping,  is spurring the rethinking of where the risk is in high yield.

 
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The "Dash-For-Trash" Is Over, Goldman Flip-Flops





Just a month ago, Goldman Sachs' head progonsticator David Kostin went full bulltard, telling clients to buy high-beta, high-momentum stocks because (paraphrasing) "hedge funds suck" and will need to play catch-up. Today, his tune has changed. The "dash-for-trash" meme has outperformed dramatically in the last few years as Fed experimentation breathed life into the zombie-est weak-balance-sheet companies and traders rode that artificial wave. However,as Kostin notes, tightening financial conditions have the greatest impact on firms with high leverage and weak balance sheets; and thus, with the Fed more biased towards tightening than loosening (and the market discounting that), the "dash-for-trash" is over (as we noted in July).

 
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The Ides Of October





The central bankers have truly been the markets best friends and Draghi and Kuroda-san have been taking over where Ms Yellen has all but left off, but even they can do little in the face of protest and dissent by various members of the global populace and the continuing stupidity and arrogance of our “democratically” elected representatives.

 
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"When Bad News Becomes Bad News" - Albert Edwards Presents His "Second Most Imporant Chart To Investors"





"amid the inevitable impending global economic and financial carnage, when people, like Queen Elizabeth ask, as she did in November 2008, why no-one saw this coming, tell them that many did. But just like in 2006, before the Great Recession, investors once again chose to tilt their ears towards the reassuring siren songs of the Central Bankers and away from the increasingly hysterical ramblings of the perma-bears and doomsayers."

 
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David Tepper: Bill Gross "Who Cares?", Regrets FNMA, Economy "Good", Stocks Not Expensive





He's back. A month after Appaloosa's David Tepper explained the end of the bond bull market was here (and 10Y rates are now 5bps lower), the trend-following master-of-the-universe explained to Bloomberg TV's Stephanie Ruhle and Erik Schatzker how the departure of Bill Gross from PIMCO was "nothing... who cares?"; why "the US economy is pretty good", how junk bonds are at "fair value" and stocks are cheap as "multiples are not high." Finally he explains how he "wished he didn't have any investment" in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and clarifies in his billionaire-all-knowing-ness how he is sure the United States can contain Ebola.

 
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Small Caps Suffer Worst Quarter In 3 Years; Bonds Leading Year-To-Date





Despite the ubiquitous v-shaped recovery in stocks from the US open to EU close (decoupling entirely from bonds), stocks slumped into the end of the quarter leaving the S&P and Dow barely positive for Q3 and Russell 2000 down 7.9% - its worst quarter since Q2 2011 (and -5.2% year-to-date). Treasury yields flip-flopped around in a 4-5bps range with a late-day ramp (suggesting liquidations cough PIMCO cough) leaving 30Y -1bps on the week. The USDollar suged higher in the European session and traded lower in the US session. The bigger news on the day was the carnage in commodities that appeared to occur around the European close (desk chatter of commodity fund liquidations). Silver and WTI Crude were monkey-hammered, gold and copper dropped to down 1% on the week. VIX pumped and dumped again but closed above 16. Stocks closed very weak with Russell tumbling 1.5% on the day to not "off the lows."

 
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The Goldman Tapes And Why The Delusion Of Macro-Prudential Regulation Means The Next Crash Is Nigh





There is nothing like the release of secret tape recordings to clarify an inconclusive debate. Actually, what the tapes really show is that the Fed’s latest policy contraption - macro-prudential regulation through a financial stability committee - is just a useless exercise in CYA. Macro-pru is an impossible delusion that should not be taken seriously be sensible adults. It is not, as Janet Yellen insists, a supplementary tool to contain and remediate the unintended consequence - that is, excessive financial speculation - of the Fed’s primary drive to achieve full employment and fill the GDP bathtub to the very brim of its potential. Instead,  rampant speculation, excessive leverage, phony liquidity and massive financial instability are the only real result of current Fed policy.

 
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Futures Rebound Following Yesterday's Rout





It was all up to the Japanese banana market to fix things overnight: after the biggest tumble in US equities in months, and Asian markets poised for their third consecutive weekly drop, the longest streak since February, Japan reported CPI numbers that despite still surging (for example, in August TV prices soared 9.5%, but "down" from 11.8% the month before), when "adjusting" for the effects of the April tax hike, missed across the board. As a result the USDJPY was at the lows and threatening to break the recent parabolic surge higher which has helped move global equities higher in the past few weeks when the usual spate of GPIF-related headlines, because apparently the fact that Japan will and already has begun sacrificing the retirement funds of its citizens just to keep Abe's deranged monetary dream alive for a few more months has not been fully priced in yet, sent the USDJPY soaring yet again.

 
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