Hong Kong

China Services PMI Rises (And Falls); Stocks Jump Led By Brokers, Exchanges On Shenzhen Trading Link Resumption

Following Caixin China Manufacturing's 'surprise' jump higher (in the face of the official PMI flat), Caixin Services PMI just beat expectations and bounced considerably to a 'healthy expanding' 52.0 (despite official Services PMI plunge), bringing the Composite PMI to 49.9 - thus proving that billions of dollars of liquidity injections, market interventions, debt transfers to SOEs, arrests, shootings, and general thuggery has fixed China. For now stocks are rallying on this news but offshore Yuan is continuing to leak back to Friday's lows. The biggest gainers are the Chinese brokerages and exchanges (HKEx is up 8%) after PBOC Governor Zhou said a trading link with Shenzhen will start this year.

Over 40% Of Chinese Goods Sold Online Are Counterfeit

Following a recent report documenting the surge in empty malls littering China, many suggested that this is indicative of a shift to online shopping and migration to platforms such as Alibaba. That may well be the case, but unlike in the US where one is assured at least some quality control and has a rational expectation that what was ordered online is what will be delivered, in China the reality is far different. According to China's official news agency, Xingua, more than 40% of goods sold online in China last year were either counterfeits or of bad quality, illustrating the extent of a problem that has bogged down the fast-growing online sector.

Frontrunning: November 3

  • S&P 500 Futures Slip as Aussie Gains on Rate Outlook; Oil Rises (BBG)
  • Xi Says China Needs at Least 6.5% Growth in Next Five Years (BBG)
  • Ben Carson Vaults to Lead in Latest Journal/NBC Poll (WSJ)
  • World's Biggest Banks Still Not `Truly Resolvable,' FSB Says (BBG)
  • Keystone XL's builder faced darkening prospects (Reuters)
  • Merkel Says Germany Must Step Up World Role in Refugee Crisis (BBG)

China's Manufacturing Misses; Nonmanufacturing Worst Since 2008 Despite Unprecedented $1 Trillion "Debt Injection"

The most anticipated economic release over the weekend was the early glimpse into China's manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors via the two key PMI surveys released by China's National Bureau of Statistics, to get a sense if the slowdown across China is stabilizing or, as some have suggested, rebounding. It did not: overnight the NBS reported that the manufacturing PMI remained unchanged in October at 49.8 missing consensus estimates of a modest rebound to 50.0, its third consecutive month in contraction territory.

Yuan Soars Most In A Decade As China Moves To Relax Capital Controls

As Beijing fights to keep "Mr. Chen" and his "yellow loafers," tea, and Snickers bars from smuggling billions out of the country on behalf of Chinese citizens fearing an economic implosion and a double-digit deval, capital account convertibility may counterintuitively be one of the PBoC's most effective weapons as loosening capital controls will both calm the panicked masses and support the IMF SDR bit. Still, as Citi's David Lubin puts it, "China should expect to see gross capital outflows for the foreseeable future [and] it's not even clear that SDR inclusion will lead to a net capital inflow to China." 

Futures Fade Overnight Ramp After BOJ Disappoints, Attention Returns To Hawkish Fed

Back in September we explained why, contrary to both conventional wisdom and the BOJ's endless protests to the contrary, neither the BOJ nor the ECB have any interest in boosting QE at this - or any other point - simply because with every incremental bond they buy, the time when the two central banks run out of monetizable debt comes closer. Since then the ECB has jawboned that it may boost QE (but it has not done so), and overnight as reported previously, the BOJ likewise did not expand QE despite many, including Goldman Sachs, expecting it would do just that.

The Ghost Cities Finally Died: For China's Steel Industry "The Outlook Is The Worst Ever Amid Unprecedented Losses"

In late 2014 something happened: for whatever reason the most unregulated aspect of China's financial system, its shadow banks, not only stopped lending money but actually went into reverse, thus putting a lid on China's Total Social Financing expansion, which had been the world's "under the radar" growth dynamo for so many years. At that moment not only did China's ghost cities officially die, but it meant an imminent collapse for China's steel industry. That collapse has arrived.

The Housing Bubble Is Biggest In These Cities

"House prices have decoupled most from local incomes in Hong Kong, London, Paris, Singapore, New York and Tokyo. Buying a 60-square-meter apartment exceeds the budget of most people who work even in the highly-skilled service sector. Loose monetary policy has prevented a normalization of housing markets and encouraged local bubble risks to grow"

Frontrunning: October 29

  • Fed puts December rate hike firmly on the agenda (Reuters)
  • Charting the Markets: A More Hawkish Fed Rattles Investors (BBG)
  • China to modernize and improve fiscal and tax systems (Reuters)
  • Deutsche Bank to Cut 35,000 Jobs in Overhaul (WSJ)
  • Deutsche Bank Said to Near $200 Million Sanctions Settlement (BBG)
  • Barclays profits drop as it abandons cost-cutting targets (FT)