Housing Market

Tyler Durden's picture

Diminishing Returns On Central-Planning Policy Extremes = 2016 Crash

The problem with these policy extremes is that they are so painfully visibly acts of central-planning desperation. If things are as positive as we're told, then why are central planners forced to impose such absurdly extreme policies to keep the status quo from imploding? If these policies worked, why are interest rates still pegged to zero after six years of "growth" and the inflation of monumental asset bubbles? If these policies don't work (and they obviously don't, otherwise the authorities could have normalized interest rates and ceased quantitative easing, stock purchases, plunge protection schemes, etc. many years ago) and central planners keep doing more of what has failed, then the only possible conclusions are...

Tyler Durden's picture

Argentina As A Model For Greece

"I think that if Greece were to leave the Euro things would get very complicated for them... and this would create the same very unhealthy situation as we have in Argentina. Why? If people start storing value in a foreign currency, in this case Greeks using Euros, this will create a huge lack of transparency and affect normal trade flows and transactions. And we know that the parallel economy in Greece is already quite large the way it is. So imagine an exponential version of that. It would be a very difficult period for Greece."

EconMatters's picture

What is a Market?

What happened in the China stock market is the latest culmination of the slippery slope of governmental and central bank intervention in financial markets.....

Tyler Durden's picture

"When People Jump In Even Though It's Overpriced, That's A Bubble" Shiller Warns

Bob Shiller moves beyond his normal fence-sitting perspective and goes full Marc Faber in this brief clip. Noting that his CAPE indicator of equity market valuation is flashing red (highest since 1929, 2000, and 2007), Shiller warns it is "when people jump into stocks even though they know valuations are high... that's a bubble," slamming CNBC's rosy perspective reflecting that this is the same as the dotcom rise. Notably he warns specifically "The US equity market is one of the highest in the world," and now is a good time to diversify away from it. Additionally Shiller warns of the slowing momentum in the housing market... warning that mean-reversion is likely with risk for further decline.

Tyler Durden's picture

"The Fallout Ratio" Is Flashing Red - The Chart That Realtors Don't Want You To See

The Home Sales Fallout Ratio gives us an idea of the trend of contracts (aka 'pending home sales') falling through and failing to close. It is telling us that, while sales are at a 9 year high, trouble is brewing in the current version of the bubbly housing market. This could be a harbinger of mass destruction should mortgage rates begin a persistent rise from here.

Tyler Durden's picture

Rent-A-Tent - The Next Silicon Valley Startup

In the modern economy, we share everything: STDs, food stamps, transportation, and housing. It's all facilitated by mobile technology. First there was Rent A Gent. Now, the next part of the sharing economy is upon us: Rent A Tent.

Marc To Market's picture

Dollar Psychology ahead of Key Events in Greece and US Jobs Data

A look at the psycholgoy of traders as reflected in the price action ahead the new week which promises to be eventful.

Tyler Durden's picture

American Babies Are No Longer Mostly White

"Racial and ethnic minorities now surpass non-Hispanic whites as the largest group of American children under 5 years old, the Census Bureau said Thursday. The demographic rise of minorities comes at a time when heightened racial tensions make headlines from St. Louis to Charleston, South Carolina, and as minorities lag in education, earnings and labor market outcomes."

Tyler Durden's picture

Auto Loans In "Untested" Territory Blackstone Warns As Subprime ABS Sales Accelerate

"Of the subprime vehicle loans bundled into securities, 73 percent now exceed five years, up from 64 percent during the first three months of 2014. 'Because cars depreciate quickly, a borrower is typically upside down or underwater toward the end of a long loan term.' 'The risk is that you extend a loan that a borrower cannot afford over its term schedule. Inching out to 75 and 84 months, I don’t think that has been tested yet.'"

Tyler Durden's picture

Why New Home Sales Remain At Recession Levels, In One Chart

What is the reason for the non-existant rebound? Simple: the following chart comparing total new home sales and the median new home sales price explains it.

Tyler Durden's picture

How Urban Homeowners Rigged The Housing Market And Killed GDP Growth

The phenomenon of homeowners objecting to new development is called NIMBYism, which stands for "Not In My Back Yard." The premise behind this is that homeowners don't want to risk any changes that could adversely affect their living space or the value of their property. However, it's easy to see another motive behind NIMBYism: greed. As an investor of a highly leveraged asset, the average homeowner has every reason to inflate the price of their home as much as they can. NIMBYism also contributes to inequality... and perpetuates the two-class society that we see today.

Tyler Durden's picture

Credit Market Warning

There are large signs of stress now present in the credit markets. You might not know it from today's multi-generationally low interest rates, but other key measures such as liquidity and volatility are flashing worrying signs. While some may hope that rising yields are signaling a return to more rapid economic growth, or at least that the fear of outright deflation has lessened, the more likely explanation is that something is wrong and it’s about to get... wronger.

Tyler Durden's picture

Another Fed "Insider" Quits, Tells The Truth

"The Fed is allowing the [market] tail to wag the [monetary policy] dog... The Fed's credibility itself is at stake... they have backed themselves into a very tight corner... the tightest ever... The hope today is that the current era of easy monetary policy will have no deep economic ramifications. Such thinking, though, may prove to be naive... All retirees’ security is thus at risk when the massive overvaluation in fixed income and equity markets eventually rights itself."

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