Housing Prices

Trader Warns Of Week Ahead Event Risk: "If You Thought This Week Was Bad..."

It was a week when the world was supposed to come to an end, notes Bloomberg's Richard Breslow, but then it didn’t... However, next week’s big events include a meeting between the Chinese and American presidents. Don’t underestimate the importance of it or the market interest it will garner.

These Are The Best And Worst U.S. Cities To Own A House

At the top, with annual price increases of 10% or more, we find the usual west coast (and thus closest to China) suspects: Seattle and Portland, followed close behind by Denver and Dallas, which appears to be enjoying the recent revival in shale.

Global Stocks, US Futures Slide Spooked By G20 Protectionist Shift; Dollar Drops For 4th Day

Global markets start the week mixed with Asian stocks rising (Japan was closed for holiday), European stocks sliding, weighed down by declines in oil-and-gas shares and banks, and S&P500 futures also down. The dollar fell to a six-week low, falling four days in a row for the first time since early November as G20 leaders scrap a long-standing commitment to reject all forms of trade protectionism.

Is The Snapchat IPO Proof Of A Tech Bubble?

The worrying comparison with the 2000-peak should be writing on the wall, a warning that the policies like those of the Fed aren't really healing wounds - they're simply creating another bubble.

16 Reasons Not To Live In California

 It has been said that "as California goes, so goes the nation."  That is why it is such a shame what is happening to that once great state...

S&P Futures, Global Stocks Jump Ahead Of US Payrolls As Global Bond Rout Continues

European and Asian shares rise along with a jump in S&P futures which are pointing to a solidly green open on US payrolls day. The dollar, trading somewhat weaker against the euro was stronger against the yen, and was on track for its firth week of gains, while the rout in global Treasuries continued following a Mario Draghi conference that was interpreted as more hawkish than expected.

Putting It All Together...

Population growth, economic growth, and resultant energy consumption are inexorably slowing. The Federal Reserve knows it can not stop this and is simply slowing the inevitable with interest rate cuts to incent greater consumption via skyrocketing credit/debt...