Hyperinflation

Tyler Durden's picture

Peak Empire 2.0





Based on the lessons of history, all empires collapse eventually; thus, the probability that the US empire will collapse can be set at 100% with a great deal of confidence. The question is, When? (Everyone keeps asking that annoying question.)

 
Tyler Durden's picture

And The Biggest Beneficiary Of QE3 Is...





When it comes to the Fed's QE3 generosity, what was the bottom line? Here is the answer.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

QE Ends in the US… And Won't Begin in the EU…





The markets continue to operate based on complete delusions.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Gold Is Undervalued





Gold has been in a bear market for three years. Technical analysts are asking themselves whether they should call an end to this slump on the basis of the "triple-bottom" recently made at $1180/oz, or if they should be wary of a coming downside break beneath that level. The purpose of this article is to look at the drivers of the gold price and explain why today's market value is badly reflective of gold's true worth.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Investing World In 10 Objects





What do an old German bank note, a current $100 bill, and an apple all have in common? The answer, according to ConvergEx's Nick Colas, is that these simple objects can tell us much about the current investment scene, ranging from Europe’s economic challenges to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s attempts to reduce unemployment. Colas takes an “object-ive” approach to analyzing the current investment landscape by describing 10 common items and how they shape our perceptions of reality. The other objects on our list: a hazmat suit, a house in Orlando, a barrel of oil, a Rolex watch, a butterfly, a heating radiator in Berlin, and a smartphone.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Carl Icahn: "The Fed Turned This Market Around Here"





"The Fed is really holding the market up.... The Fed turned this market around here because it let it be known that the Fed funds rate isn't going to be raised in March. I am concerned about the high yield market, I think that's in a major bubble, but nobody knows when it's gonna burst." - Carl Icahn

 
williambanzai7's picture

HoW JaPaNeSe HYPeRINFLaTioN STaRTS IN ONe PiCTuRe...





J.A. does not = Jack Abe...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Japanese Hyperinflation Starts (In 1 Chart)





The Japanese Yen's real effective exchange rate (REER) has collapsed to the weakest since 1982, according to Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities. Simply put, REER is a trade-weighted measure of Yen strength (or weakness) against, in this case, 59 trading partners; and as the nation posts an unprecedented 27th straight month of trade deficits, Bloomberg reports MUFJ indicates "a structural shift" has taken place. As MUFJ chief FX strategist warns, "If the trade deficit doesn’t noticeably narrow from here, the yen’s real effective rate could fall to levels never seen before," and, ominously, "from a supply and demand perspective, yen selling for foreign currency by Japanese importers will just continue endlessly." And Japan becomes Venezuela...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Japanese Stocks Tumble After BoJ Bond-Buying Operation Fails For First Time Since Abenomics





Having rotated their attention to the T-bill market in Japan (after demand for the Bank of Japan's cheap loans disappointed policymakers) in an effort to ensure enough freshly printed money was flushed into Japanese markets, the BoJ now has a major problem. For the first time since QQE began, Bloomberg reports the BoJ failed to buy all the bonds they desired. Whether this is investors unwilling to sell (preferring the safe haven than stocks or eu bonds) or that BoJ has soaked up too much of the market (that dealers now call "dead") is unclear. Japanese stocks - led by banks - are sliding as bond-demand sends 5Y yields (13bps) to 18-month lows.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Hyperinflation Doesn't Scare Kuroda But Ex-BoJ Chief Says "Quit While You're Ahead"





Apparently under pressure from some members of Japan's parliament (who are likely being screamed at by the firms and people that bought and voted for them) as they question the possibility of JPY dropping to 170 per USD, BoJ Chief Haruhiko Kuroda proclaimed yesterday that "monetary policy can prevent hyperinflation," but don't worry because he "doesn't think Japan will experience hyperinflation." Well that's a relief because all his other predictions about how well Abenomics would work have been utter failures. Perhaps Kuroda should listen to ex-BoJ chief economist Hideo Hakayawa who stunningly suggested, The BOJ should start paring its unprecedented easing soon or risk hurting people, "it’s important to quit while you’re ahead."

 
Gold Standard Institute's picture

Why is the Gold Standard Urgent?





The fiat dollar harms us in many ways, but rising prices is the least of them. There is no limit to prices, but credit abuse can only continue so long, before the dollar fails.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The QE4 Countdown Has Begun





The head of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank on Tuesday said he would be open to another of round asset purchases if inflation trends were to fall significantly short of the U.S. central bank's target. Although he said it would take a big shift in the U.S. economic outlook for the Fed to restart its bond buying, John Williams said the possibility of a new downturn in Europe and other global economic woes pose a risk to the United States. "If we really get a sustained, disinflationary forecast ... then I think moving back to additional asset purchases in a situation like that should be something we should seriously consider," Williams said in an interview with Reuters.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Defining Problem Of Our Times (In 1 Simple Chart)





Hyperinflation and hyper-deflation are just two different forms of the same phenomenon: credit collapse. Arguing which of the two forms will dominate is futile: it blurs the focus of inquiry and frustrates efforts to avoid disaster.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

After Abenomics Failed In Japan, It Is About To Be Tried In Europe





After two years of Abenomics, Japan officially admitted it has entered a triple-dip recession. While people with a modicum of common sense warned this would happen long ago, it actually came as a surprise to traditionally trained economists: after all, a country whose economy collapsed under piecemeal episodes of "Abenomics" over the past three decades was supposed to, if only for those trained in the Keynesian school, promptly recover (even though its fundamental problem is not economic but demographic) when that which had failed for so long was applied in one shock episode. It didn't work. So now that Abenomics has officially failed in Japan (but will remain in place until Abe is ouster, either voluntarily as the local population has had enough of Japan's record inflation imports) what comes next? It is about to be tried in Europe of course

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Will Gold Crash With The Dow... Or Soar?





In recent months, this prognostication has been gaining traction that a second, more severe crash - one that reflected the level of debt - is inevitable. There are two primary camps amongst economists with regard to the economic direction that a crash will generate: inflationists and deflationists. The argument goes back and forth, yet there seems to be the misconception that one must be either an inflationist or deflationist. This is not at all the case.

 
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