Hyperinflation

One More Casualty Of The 9/11 Farce - The Petrodollar

It’s been about 15 years now since passenger airliners struck the World Trade Center towers on 9/11, and we are still suffering the consequences of that day, though perhaps not in the ways many Americans might believe. The 9/11 attacks were billed by the Bush Administration as a “wake-up call” for the U.S., and neocons called it the new Pearl Harbor. But instead of it being an awaking, the American public was led further into blind ignorance. Clearly, after 15 years of disastrous policy, it is time to admit that the U.S. response to 9/11 has damaged us far more than the actual attacks ever could.

Venezuela Economy Literally Grinds To A Halt As Maduro Orders "Five Day Weekend" For Public Workers

Overnight things went from comical to farcical overnight when the Venezuela gift kept on giving, and the nation expanded the three-day weekend to five days, declaring a two-day work week for government workers, adding it was seeking international help to save its power grid amid a drought that threatens the capital’s main source of electricity. The two-day work week, after the government added Wednesdays and Thursdays as non-working days to save more power.

Why Is The Stock Market So Strong?

Although money supply growth remains historically strong and investors are desperately chasing returns in today’s ZIRP world and are therefore evidently prepared to take much greater risks than they otherwise would, an extremely overvalued market is always highly vulnerable to a change in perceptions. In a sense the rebound may actually turn out to be self-defeating, as it will increase the Fed’s willingness resume tightening policy.

Trump Hints He Would Replace Janet Yellen

Three weeks after angering the mainstream media with his apocryphal assessment that the US "Is Headed For A Massive Recession" and that "It's A Terrible Time To Invest In Stocks", Trump is likely set to make even more waves with an interview he gave to Fortune magazine, which will be released in its entirety later this week, in which Trump says that while he likes Janet Yellen’s low interest rates, he is not a big fan of Janet Yellen herself.  "I think she’s done a serviceable job," Trump tells Fortune. "I don’t want to comment on reappointment, but I would be more inclined to put other people in."

The Whole System Is Built Upon Lies And "We're In The Terminal Phase"

"We’re in the terminal phase of the greatest debt bubble in all of human history... The crisis that happened last time around… it was just a warning signal of what would happen if we didn’t fix our problems... and of course we didn’t fix them. It’s not sustainable... There’s going to be a permanent, massive adjustment and a loss of faith in the current system..."

What Is The Worst-Case Outcome Of Helicopter Money: Deutsche Bank Explains

"A “successful” helicopter drop may therefore be easier said than done given the non-linearities involved: it needs to be big enough for nominal growth expectations to shift higher and small enough to prevent an irreversible dis-anchoring of inflation expectations above the central bank’s target. Either way, the behavior of the latter is the key defining variable both for the policy’s success as well as the asset market reaction.... under the assumption of policy “success” without fears of hyperinflation, we would conclude that bond yields rise."

How To Trade The Coming Helicopter Money: Deutsche Bank Explains

"At one extreme, if the market perceives the policy as a failure, credit risk and demand/supply imbalances are likely to dominate, putting even further downward pressure on yields. At the other extreme, if the policy is perceived as a loss of monetary discipline, inflation expectations would spike, leading to an aggressive re-pricing of yields higher."

Former IMF Chief Economist Admits Japan's "Endgame" Scenario Is Now In Play

Japan is heading for a full-blown solvency crisis as the country runs out of local investors and may ultimately be forced to inflate away its debt in a desperate end-game, one of the world’s most influential economists has warned.  "One day the BoJ may well get a call from the finance ministry saying please think about us – it is a life or death question - and keep rates at zero for a bit longer."

Ben Bernanke: "Helicopter Money May Be The Best Available Alternative"

"Money-financed fiscal programs (MFFPs), known colloquially as helicopter drops, are very unlikely to be needed in the United States in the foreseeable future. They also present a number of practical challenges of implementation, including integrating them into operational monetary frameworks and assuring appropriate governance and coordination between the legislature and the central bank. However, under certain extreme circumstances—sharply deficient aggregate demand, exhausted monetary policy, and unwillingness of the legislature to use debt-financed fiscal policies—such programs may be the best available alternative."

"The People Aren't Stupid" - Germany Takes Aim At The ECB, May Sue Draghi: Spiegel

The alienation between Germany and the ECB has reached a new level. Back in deutsche mark times, Europeans often joked that the Germans "may not believe in God, but they believe in the Bundesbank," as Germany's central bank is called. Today, though, when it comes to relations between the ECB and the German population, people are more likely to speak of "parallel universes."... Should it come to helicopter money, Berlin would have to consider taking the ECB to court to clarify the limits of its mandate. In other words: the German government and Draghi's ECB would be adversaries in a public court case.

The World Has 6 Options To Avoid Japan's Fate, And According To HSBC, They Are All Very Depressing

"The escape options are a mixture of the ineffectual, the limited, the risky, the foolhardy or the excessively slow. As Japan’s recent experiments have demonstrated, upping the monetary dosage alone is not enough to cure the affliction. Indeed, to the extent that monetary stimulus only encourages a further wave of risk-taking within financial markets – often outside of the mainstream banking system - it may only perpetuate unstable deflationary stagnation."