Gross Domestic Product

"Last Bubble Standing" Bursts - China Junk Bond Risk Soars

In January we pointed out "the last bubble standing," as China's crashing equity market had spurred massive inflows - directed by a "well-meaning" central-planning committee's propaganda - sparking a massive bubble in Chinese corporate bond markets (in an effort to enable desperately weak balance-sheet firms to roll/refi their debt and keep the zombies alive). That has now ended as China's junk bond risk has soared to 5-month highs with its worst selloff since 2014. As HFT warns, "we should avoid junk bonds."

Futures Fade As Chinese "Good News Is Bad News" For Fed, Oil Drops As Doha Concerns Emerge

Good news is still bad news after all. After last night's China 6.7% GDP print which while the lowest since Q1 2009, was in line with expectations, coupled with beats in IP, Fixed Asset Investment and Retail Sales (on the back of $1 trillion in total financing in Q1)  the sentiment this morning is that China has turned the corner (if only for the time being). And that's the problem, because while China was a good excuse for the Fed to interrupt its rate hike cycle as the biggest "global" threat, that is no longer the case if China has indeed resumed growing. As such Yellen no longer has a ready excuse to delay. This is precisely why futures are lower as of this moment, because suddenly the "scapegoat" narrative has evaporated.

'Economic Models' Forecast GOP White House (With Or Without Trump)

"The model doesn't know or care if there are two or 10 candidates... It knows the economics and whether marginal swing voters will keep the incumbent party in or not...the logic that says that these models should have worked over the past few decades also says that they should work in this election cycle, too."

Trump Reveals How Mexico Will Pay For "The Wall"

In what he assures will be "an easy decision," Donald Trump has released details of his plan to "compel Mexico to pay for the wall." In a 600 word statement, Trump proposes, in a potentially devastating move for Mexico’s economy, to block billions of dollars in payments immigrants send back home until the nation made "a one-time payment of $5-10 billion" to the U.S.

Another Volcker Moment? Guessing The Future Without Say's Law

If the dollar’s purchasing power falls much further, the market will expect higher interest rates, so this then becomes the likely outcome. The question will then arise as to whether or not the Fed will dare to raise interest rates sufficiently to stabilise the dollar's purchasing power. If the Fed delays, it could find itself facing a difficult choice. The level of interest rates required to stabilise the dollar’s purchasing power would not be consistent with maintaining the record levels of debt in both government and private sectors. Thirty-six years on it could be another Volcker moment.

How To Trade Tomorrow's ECB Meeting

The European Central Bank promised in January to "review and reconsider" its monetary stance this week. The question, as BloombergBriefs notes, is not if policy makers will ease but how. Haruhiko Kuroda's humbling in FX markets shows what Mario Draghi is up against tomorrow: namely, that even the most forceful policy decisions can be overwhelmed by events, positioning, or sentiment. Draghi has a number of options (some more and some less priced in) but most crucially there two large gaps to be filled in European Stock indices - the question is which is filled first?

Where Have We Seen This Before: Hungary Central Bank Will Prop Up Economy By Boosting Stock Market

Today the Budapest stock exchange, now majority-owned by the central bank - just a few conflict of interest there - approved a new strategy on Wednesday to boost new listings and attract new investors, helping the government's efforts to buoy the economy. The bourse will aim for five share or corporate bond listings per year and boost stock market capitalisation to about 30 percent of gross domestic product from less than 20 percent today.

Peter Schiff: The Establishment Is Peddling Fiction, Ignoring Fact

Janet Yellen is in a very difficult spot. If she continues to ignore the growing signs of recession, she runs the risk of letting one develop prior to the election. This would favor the Republican challenger who would be disinclined to reappoint her as Fed Chairwoman, if elected. Allowing the Greenspan bubble to bust on Bush’s watch sealed John McCain’s fate, allowing Obama to ride a wave of voter outrage into the White House in 2008. Yellen does not want Trump to catch a similar wave in 2016. As a result, we expect the Fed to soften its rhetoric in the very near future.