International Monetary Fund

Former IMF Chief Economist Admits Japan's "Endgame" Scenario Is Now In Play

Japan is heading for a full-blown solvency crisis as the country runs out of local investors and may ultimately be forced to inflate away its debt in a desperate end-game, one of the world’s most influential economists has warned.  "One day the BoJ may well get a call from the finance ministry saying please think about us – it is a life or death question - and keep rates at zero for a bit longer."

Barclays Warns "Grexit" May Return This Summer While Tsipras "Demonizes" IMF

"We continue to think Greece has the potential to return to the headlines, and we do not rule out the prospect of “Grexit” returning... We note the more fragile European political environment (Dutch referendum, UK’s EU referendum, likely snap elections in Spain, key elections in France and Germany in 2017) compared to previous episodes, and the possibility that the increased noise around Greece could potentially influence the UK referendum on EU membership. Furthermore, the ongoing migration crisis in which Greece plays a central role is exacerbating tensions at both domestic and European levels."

Lost Faith In Central Banks And The Economic End Game

If the IMF is engineering a financial crisis in Europe in order to gain more power and influence, why wouldn’t the Fed be doing the same for the IMF in America? Just as the international bankers use stimulus and rate policy as tools, so, to, do they use chaos.

Frontrunning: April 6

  • Cruz, Sanders score decisive victories in Wisconsin (Reuters)
  • Clinton Can’t Get to New York Fast Enough After New Sanders Win (BBG)
  • Trump, Clinton Have Single-Digit Leads in Pennsylvania (BBG)
  • Panama law firm says data hack was external, files complaint (Reuters)
  • ‘Panama Papers’ Puts Spotlight on Boom in Offshore Services (WSJ)
  • Barclays partners with Goldman-backed bitcoin payments app (FT)

Frontrunning: April 5

  • Panama Papers: Biggest Banks Are Top Users of Offshore Services (WSJ)
  • Panama Papers probes opened, China limits access to news on leaks (Reuters)
  • Credit Suisse CEO Distances Bank From ‘Panama Papers’ (WSJ)
  • Fed's Evans says market more pessimistic on U.S. rate hikes (Reuters)
  • IMF's Lagarde Says Risks to Weak Global Recovery Are Increasing (BBG)

"Risk Off" - Global Stocks Slide As Yen Surges To 17 Month High; Bund Yields Plunge

The market's slumberous levitation of the past month, in which yesterday's -0.3% drop was the second largest in 4 weeks and in which the market had gone for 15 consecutive days without a 1% S&P 500 move (in March 2015 the sasme streak ended at day 16) may be about to end, after an overnight session, the polar opposite of yesterday's smooth sailing, which has seen a sudden return of global risk off mood.

Steve H. Hanke's picture

Authored by Steve H. Hanke of the Johns Hopkins University. Follow him on Twitter @Steve_Hanke.

Over the weekend, the New York Times reported that WikiLeaks transcripts suggested that the International Monetary Fund (I.M.F.) had discussed the possibility of hatching nefarious plots against Greece. Immediately, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras accused the I.M.F. of trying to “politically destabilize Europe.”

Germany To Greece: No Debt Relief For You

Whether or not the IMF intended to use a Greek credit event to destabilize Europe as the greek government first alleged, or whether this was "nonsense" as Lagarde responded to Tsipras letter, is irrelevant - ultimately the underlying premise was whether or not Greece gets debt relief, something the IMF has been insisting on since the third bailout package. And as is well-known, it was Germany - not Greece - that stood in the IMF's way. So after a terse weekend in which relations between Greece and the IMF devolved once again to frigidly sub-zero levels, moments ago Germany chimed in with its position, which can be summed up in another familiar word: "nein".

Wikileaks Reveals IMF Plan To "Cause A Credit Event In Greece And Destabilize Europe"

In a leaked transcript, IMF staffers are caught on tape suggesting that a threat of an imminent financial catastrophe was needed to force other players into accepting its measures such as cutting Greek pensions and working conditions, or as Bloomberg puts it, "considering a plan to cause a credit event in Greece and destabilize Europe."

Greece Demands Explanation From IMF Over Leaked Transcript

Greek politicians wasted no time in seeking a response from the IMF over the leaked transcript released earlier today by Wikileaks suggesting the IMF may threaten to pull out of the country's bailout as a tactic to force European lenders to more offer debt relief, and which according to the Greek government was "interpreted as revealing an IMF effort to blackmail Athens with a possible credit event to force it to give in on pension cuts which it has rejected."