• williambanzai7
    01/25/2015 - 14:27
    A Banzai7 salute to the Greeks for signaling the bankster $hitheads of the world (and their Eurocrat enablers) to shove it where the sun don't shine.
  • Sprott Money
    01/26/2015 - 08:30
    Making New Year “predictions” used to be an automatic, beginning-of-the-year exercise, to the point where readers generally expected such pieces from the pundits they follow. However, it is an...

India

Bruce Krasting's picture

Shipping News - and a bit more





Think of a steady stream of rusty old ships headed for the scrap-yards of India. Each one means China gets stronger.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 18





  • Germany will pay Greek aid (Spiegel)
  • Spain Banks Face More Pain as Worst-Case Scenario Turns Real (Bloomberg)
  • China’s Growth Continues to Slow (WSJ)
  • Executives Lack Confidence in U.S. Competitiveness (WSJ)
  • Poor Market Conditions will See 180 Solar Manufacturers Fail by 2015 (OilPrice)
  • Wen upbeat on China’s economy (FT)
  • Gold remains popular, despite the doubts of economists (Economist)
  • Armstrong Stands to Lose $30 Million as Sponsors Flee (Bloomberg)
  • IMF urges aid for Italy, Spain but Rome baulking (Reuters)
  • EU Summit Highlights Financial Divide (WSJ)
  • FOMC Straying on Price Target, Former Fed Officials Say (Bloomberg)
  • Putin defiant over weapons sales (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Aussie Stocks Suffer HFT Stop-Run Glitch At Open





We are now entirely used to the daily mini-flashes in US equities as algos lose their stabilizer and run one way or another. Recently we noted the same algos-gone-wild had hit the India stock exchange. Tonight, the HFT-bug has moved to Australia, where the open - which just happens to be option expiration - saws a number of major equities (including several of the banks - e.g. ANZ and CBA) get smashed instantaneously higher (by 5-7%) at the open - only to plummet back to normalcy soon after. The cuplrit - it would appear to us - is a market-clearing wipe-out of all resting stops above the multi-year highs that the stocks were at the edge of. Regulatoirs are 'investigating' though their first comment was "it is certainly nothing to do with the trading system." As the Sydney Morning Herald notes a market participant: "Either that or an algorithm has gone haywire, a mistake has been made, or these trades are deliberate.' Either way, do we have an orderly market?"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Future Of Gold, Oil, And The Dollar





The ability of reflationary policy to mute the worst risks of debt deflation has been a source of enormous frustration for stock market bears ever since the 2008 collapse. Yes, the initial moderate rally out of the S&P500’s black hole was perhaps not so surprising in 2009. Bombed-out stock markets can always manage some sort of rally. But the ability of the rally to continue through 2010, and then 2011, and now 2012 has been quite vexing and painful for bearish investors. Indeed, the entire post-2008 market phase has now produced an era of consistently poor performance for hedge funds. Recent data, for example, shows that an incredible 90% of hedge funds are underperforming the S&P500 through mid-September. Will the pain continue? If OECD policy makers do in fact lose stock markets as the main transmission mechanism for reflationary policy, then trouble of a very serious nature will make itself known in the biggest way imaginable since the 2008 crisis began.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Gold A Giffen Good?





Imagine if in 2007, Ben Bernanke, Mervyn King, Jean Claude Trichet et al, had actually possessed the analytical foresight to see what was coming, organised a meeting with the world's media and explained how, using their collective wisdom, they would solve the problem.

"There's going to be a massive global crisis, but there's no need to worry. We're just going to print money."

 

"Is that it?"

How would most people have reacted then? We think they would have laughed out loud. Why are so many of us reacting differently now? The nature of markets is that they periodically forget the lessons of history. Confidence in the status quo seems as entrenched now as it was in 2007 but Gold appears to be exhibiting 'Giffen-like' behavior where, instead of falling, demand is rising as prices rise.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Great Chess Game





Everyone is aware of a multitude of problems that besets our world, however the nature of these problems and why they exist is distorted by the media and by governments all over the world. Our leaders, corporate heads, military top-brass etc. all have a fairly good idea of what is really happening, they just don’t want us – the ignorant masses known as the general public to know what they know. The multiple crises on this planet are caused by our insane mode of living – one that seems to be dominated by economics. Our way of life (unfortunately now for most of the world) depends on an ever-expanding economic system, for if it is not expanding it is contracting. This system was all well and good while there was plenty of capacity for continued expansion, but unfortunately for all of us the limits of expansion are not far off.

 
Bruce Krasting's picture

On Inflation





One-year "money" is offered at .9750. The .9700 bid is vulnerable. I don't get it.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Food Inflation To Surge, Goldman Warns





We have been very active in our discussions of the impact of the pending rise in food prices around the world (from central bank largesse to weather-related chaos). As Goldman notes, food inflation has been one of the most significant sources of headline inflation variation in emerging markets (EM) over the past few years. Since June, international prices for agricultural commodities have risen almost 30%, increasing the risk of fresh, food-related increases to EM headline inflation. We, like Goldman, expect EM headline inflation to start to reflect the relevant pressures more broadly in the October prints at the latest. While the effects, for now, are expected to be less extreme than the 2010-2011 episode, the timing as the US enters its fiscal-cliff-prone malaise, could mean a further round of easing will reignite this critical inflationary concern.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Why A Gold Standard, Alone, Is Not Enough





We have lately noticed that there is an ongoing debate on whether (or not) the world can again embrace the gold standard. We join the debate today, with an historical as well as technical perspective. The gold standard will be the last option: If adopted, it will be out of necessity and in desperation. We are not historians. In our limited knowledge, we note however that historically, the experiment of adopting a gold standard –or a currency board system- was usually preceded by extremely trying moments, including the loss by a government of its legal tender amidst hyperinflation. The change to a commodity standard has often been then out of necessity. In summary, the Argentine case and the Dutch Golden Age suggest that the elimination of the credit multiplier (i.e. extinction of shadow banking) is more important than the asset backing a currency.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 9





  • Rajoy’s Deepening Budget Black Hole Outpaces Spain’s Cuts (Bloomberg)
  • ECB May Need to Cut Rates Given Deflation Risk, IMF Says (Bloomberg)
  • Global Recession Risk Rises (WSJ)
  • Romney Leads Obama in Pew Likely Voter Poll After Debate (Bloomberg)
  • IMF Sees Global Risk in China-Japan Spat (WSJ)
  • Republicans shift tone on taxing the rich (FT)
  • Romney casts Obama's foreign policy as weak, dangerous (Reuters)
  • Europe Salutes Greek Budget-Cutting Will, Raising Aid Prospects (Bloomberg)
  • U.S. Downgrade Seen as Upgrade as U.S. Debt Dissolved (Bloomberg)
  • IMF Says Most Advanced Nations Making Progress Reducing Deficits (Bloomberg)
  • Eurozone launches €500bn rescue fund (FT)
 
AVFMS's picture

08 Oct 2012 – “ Won't Get Fooled Again ” (The Who, 1971)





Some correction of Friday’s Bull trap: European Risk Off, EGB credit torsion and weaker equities.

Doubtful whether any fireworks will come out of the ECOFIN meeting.

Seems to be more about maintaining the relative market quietness and status-quo.



 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 8





  • Italy rejects need for EU control (FT)
  • ‘Worst US quarterly earnings since 2009’ (FT)
  • Chinese firm helps Iran spy on citizens (Reuters)
  • World Bank cuts East Asia GDP outlook, flags China risks (Reuters)
  • Foxconn factory rolls on in spite of strike (China Daily)
  • Economic recovery ‘on the ropes’ (FT)
  • Japan Tries Cars That Make the Mini Look Maxi (Businessweek)
  • Euro Finance Chiefs to Give Positive Greece Statement, Rehn Says (Bloomberg)
  • Romney attacks drones policy (FT)
  • Euro zone mulls 20 billion euro separate budget (Reuters)
  • Hong Kong’s Leung Seeks Turnaround With Economy Focus (Bloomberg)
  • RBA Keeps Some Documents Private in Securency Bribe Probe (Bloomberg)
  • India Inflation to Remain at 7.5%-8% Till Early 2013 (WSJ)
 
williambanzai7's picture

THe WoRLD iS FIAT...





Happy ColumBen Day 2012!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Turkey & Syria Clash And Asians Take A Shine To Silver





Precious metals have all run up with the recent loose money policies enacted by various governments.  Clearly the market darling of late is silver which is now gaining favour in Asia for its value appeal.  Spot silver traded in New York has risen by 27% since the end of June, while the price of spot gold has increased by a meek 12%. Analysts say future Indian demand is key for silver’s price to climb. Futures contracts for silver at India's largest commodity exchange, the Multi Commodity Exchange, rocketed 30% in September compared with July, while volumes fell by 10% for gold futures contracts over the same period. Indian rupee weakness sent gold prices in rupees to an all time high this year, while silver never exceeded the record it hit last April. Rupee-denominated silver is currently being quoted around 20% below the record. Indian investors have ceased purchasing because the 2 weeks ending Oct. 15th is regarded as inauspicious.  The buying will commence and peak during the week ahead of the Hindu festival of Diwali on November 13th. In China, on the Shanghai Futures Exchange silver futures were up 29% at the end of September verses the end of June, while gold climbed 13%, according to data from the exchange's website.

 
Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!