Instinet

Death Of The Salesmen - Mifid II Strikes Again

The imminent prospect of Mifid II, with the unbundling of research costs, was bad enough in terms of complexity and lower profitability for both the buy and sell sides...never mind disastrous for the analysts who are likely lose their jobs. Now the regulatory "powers that be" can add salesmen and sales traders, ensuring that collective hatred of them is about to reach a new all-time high.

Traders Scramble To "Explain" Sudden Nasdaq Swoon

"Explanations" differed as to what spurred the 1% swoon in Nasdaq stocks an hour into trading, with everything from the velocity of last week’s rally, this morning’s economic data and the Supreme Court’s decision to hear arguments on the Trump administration’s travel ban and being cited.

A Russian Went Inside A Chinese Click-Farm: This Is What He Found

On the day when Snapchat erased billions of market cap from investors (and founders) accounts - as the MAUs-means-money model seems to break - we thought it worthwhile taking another glimpse into the hush-hush world of 'click-farms' and the fakeness of the latest social network fads.

In Its Second Attempt At Going Public, BATS Prices $253 Million IPO At $19/Share

It's time for try number two. Moments ago BATS announced that it has just priced its second attempt at going public by pricing its (second) initial public offering at a price to the public of $19.00 per share (this time the high end of the range). The size of the offering has been increased from the initially announced 11,200,000 shares of common stock to 13,300,000 shares of common stock.

Frontrunning: January 14

  • Islamic State launches militant assault on Indonesia's capital (Reuters)
  • Three winners emerge in $1.6 billion Powerball jackpot (Reuters)
  • European Stocks Tumble, Credit Markets Weaken on Growth Concern (BBG)
  • Stocks and commodity currencies floored by new oil plunge (Reuters)
  • China Bear Market Looms as PBOC Fails to Stop Flight to Safety (BBG)
  • Anxious phone calls, tense moments before Iran's Supreme Leader okayed U.S. sailors' release (Reuters)

Futures Stumble Out Of The Gate, Slide 0.6% On Lack Of Chinese RRR Cut: What Happens Next?

On Friday, ahead of the closing stock rout, we forecast that the biggest risk for anyone staying long over the weekend was a disappointment out of China, where the sellside had gotten so excited that a 50-100bps RRR cut was imminent, that the lack of one would surely send futures sliding. Sure enough, as we noted earlier today, much to everyone's surprise and disappointment, the PBOC did nothing (for reasons we speculated upon earlier). Which bring us to this evening's S&P futures, which opened for trading minutes ago, and as expected, gapped by over 0.6% after the Chinese disappointment, down 13 points to 1958 and looking quite heavy.

HFT Pays: CEO Of Firm That Accounts For 5% Of US Equity Volume Selling His NY Mansion For $114 Million

Everyone knows that the most parasitic form of trading, that would be high frequency trading for those who may not have followed this website since 2009, is very profitable. Well, it is certainly profitable for those who operate the momentum-igniting, quote churning, HFT firms in control of what's left of the "market", if not so much for anyone else. Just how profitable is it? Judging by the house that Vincent Viola, head of Virtu Financial, one of the largest high frequency electronic trading and market making firms, which according to Cifu accounts for more than 5% of US equities volume and over 10% of the of the average daily volume of MSFT, and which tried to expand even more aggressively with a failed bid for Knight Capital last year, has just put on the block.

The Next (Lack Of) Trading Casualty: Nomura's Brand New $270 Million Trading Floor

Over the past several months (and years) we have been warning that the ongoing collapse in trading volumes, in part due to the lack of faith in capital markets that now have all the integrity of a rigged Vegas casino from the 1960s, in part due to investors' need to monetize assets in a world in which wages simply refuse to keep up with prices, will have not only irreversible implications on the shape of market structure, but also substantial consequences when it comes to the layout of modern banks, and associated up and downstream variables, such a jobs, real estate, support professions, municipal taxes and much more. Nowhere is this more evident (for now at least) than in the massive corporate reorganization taking place at Nomura's American division, which among many other things is about to lose its brand new $270 million trading floor even before a single trader set foot in it.