International Monetary Fund

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Athenian Democracy vs. Neoliberal Gods

Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras allows the Greek people to decide their own fate via a democratic referendum. That’s enough to send the troika – the European Central Bank (ECB), the European Commission (EC), and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) - into a paroxysm of rage. Here, in a nutshell, is everything one needs to know about the EU “dream”.

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Greek Banks Considering 30% Haircut On Deposits Over €8,000: FT

"Greek banks are preparing contingency plans for a possible “bail-in” of depositors amid fears. The plans, which call for a “haircut” of at least 30 per cent on deposits above €8,000, sketch out an increasingly likely scenario for at least one bank, the sources said."

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The Complete Greek Referendum Walk-Thru: When, How, What To Expect; And What Comes Next

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Greek Banks To Run Out Of Physical Cash "In A Matter Of Days"

Greek banks will run out of cash "in a matter of days," WSJ reports. Meanwhile, businesses are closing their doors as suppliers refuse to extend credit prompting the Athens Chamber of Commerce to predict that "in one week, two weeks, three weeks, it will be finished."

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How Greece Has Fallen Victim To "Economic Hit Men"

"Greece is being 'hit', there's no doubt about it," exclaims John Perkins, author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, noting that "[Indebted countries] become servants to what I call the corporatocracy ... today we have a global empire, and it's not an American empire. It's not a national empire... It's a corporate empire, and the big corporations rule."

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Fed Whisperer Hilsenrath Hints: Despite Jobs Miss, Yellen Will Hike In 2015

There are two narratives, according to WSJ's Fed whisperer Jon Hilsenrath, that need to be considered when judging the Fed's next steps. First is, the economy stumbled in Q1 but everything will be awesome going forward (so we should hike rates); and a second newer narrative is the turmoil overseas which could be exaggerated by Fed actions. Hilsenrath hints today that despite the miss in jobs data, it remains above 200,000 and "suggests the U.S. economy finished the first half of the year with a solid foundation to weather turbulence from overseas," giving The Fed room to hike.

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"Heartbreaking" Scene Unfolds At Greek Banks As Pensioners Clamor For Cash

1,000 Greek bank branches chanced a stampede in order to open their doors to the country's retirees on Wednesday. The scene was somewhat chaotic as pensioners formed long lines and the country’s elderly attempted to squeeze through the doors in order to access pension payments.

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Who Will Be The Last To Crash?

This is the question that astute investors are forced to ask themselves these days. No reasonable person believes that a system of ever-expanding debt can resolve painlessly. It simply cannot happen... not, at least, until 2+2 stops equaling four. But the international money system, while deeply interconnected, can implode in sections. In fact, it’s highly unlikely that it will crash as a single unit. So, if you have significant moneys to invest, you end up coming back to our question: Who will be the last to crash?

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What If Gold Is Declared Illegal?

Over the weekend, the lines in Greece stretched along the street. Around the corner. Down the block. Lines to get cash. Lines to buy gas. Lines of people eager to get their hands on something of value. Food. Fuel. Cash. Pity the poor guy who was last in line... As more and more people turn to gold as a way to avoid standing in lines, the feds could ban it again. But when we close our eyes and try to peer into a world where gold is illegal, what we see is a world where we want it more than ever.

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Charting Greek Referendum Path

Tsipras is calling for 'No' Vote in July 5 Referendum, but I think Greece most likely would not survive a Grexit.

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Frontrunning: July 1

  • Tsipras backs down on many Greece bailout demands (FT)
  • Creditors skeptical of Tsipras' offer (Reuters)
  • Greek Pension Rationing Begins; Poll Shows Tsipras Backed (BBG)
  • Greek referendum poll shows lead for 'No' vote, but narrowing (Reuters)
  • Greek Bank Controls Heap More Pain on Crisis-Weary Citizens (BBG)
  • Greek Crisis Ripples Across European Companies as Markets Swing (BBG)
  • China Stocks Fall: Shanghai Composite Index Drops 5.2% (BBG)
  • China June factory, services surveys fuel hopes economy leveling out (Reuters)
  • Some Chinese Are Taking 22% Margin Loans to Finance Stock Purchases (BBG)
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Equities Soar As Tsipras Said Ready To Accept Most Of Expired Bailout Offer, European Response Muted

It's deja vu all over again.

Just hours after Greece became the first developed country to default to the IMF, as a result being expelled from its existing bailout program, a little before 5am CET news hit that Greek PM Tsipras was willing to concede to virtually all creditor demands, with a few exceptions. As the FT first reported, "Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras will accept most of the bailout creditors’ conditions offered last weekend, but is still insisting on a handful of changes that could thwart a deal according to a letter he sent late on Tuesday night."

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Varoufakis Confirms Greece Will Default To IMF Today


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Greece Will Default To IMF Tomorrow, Government Official Says

Earlier today, as the exchange between Greece and its creditors got increasingly belligerent, Estonian Prime Minister Taavi said that "Greece’s debt would still remain outstanding and creditors would expect this money back." So did this latest antagonism change the Greek mind? According to a flash headline by the WSJ released moments ago, not all. In fact, Greece just made it official that it would default to the IMF in just over 24 hours: "Greece won't pay IMF tranche due Tuesday, government official says"

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Greece May Not Even Have The Funds To Conduct A Referendum

According to Germany's FAZ, "the Greek Court also estimates that the referendum will cost around 110 million euros, according to a well-informed policy analyst. Money that in view of the strapped Greek Checkout simply will not be there, even if the country saves a EUR 1.6 billion full-scale default to the International Monetary Fund this Tuesday."

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