Investment Grade

S&P Futures Unchanged As Europe Rises; Dollar Slide Sends Oil Above $47

In the latest quiet trading session, European shares rose while Asian stocks fell and S&P futures were little changed. Minutes of the Fed’s last meeting damped prospects for a U.S. interest-rate hike, sending the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index doen 0.3%, approaching a three-month low. Dollar weakness continues to buoy commodities, with the Bloomberg Commodity Index set for the most enduring rally in more than two months, as WTI flirted with $47

Portuguese Bonds Slump As Last-Investment-Grade-Standing Falters

The only thing standing between Portugal's insanely decoupled low bond yields and the ugly fundamental reality is a BBB rating from DBRS which enables The ECB to keep buying the nation's bonds. The problem is, pressure is mounting on DBRS (the only 1 of 4 raters to maintain Portugal as investment grade) to drop the hammer... and Portuguese risk is rising.

Why Wall Street Loved What The Bank of England Announced Today

Following a handful of underwhelming monetary announcements by the likes of the ECB, BOJ and RBA, today the BOE's Mark Carney unveiled his own version of Draghi's infamous "whatever it takes" gambit, unleashing a kitchen sink of options that went well beyond what Wall Street expected, even quasi-copying Draghi's phrasing, saying the central bank will take "whatever action is necessary" to ensure the UK economy remains strong.

The Stock Market's Big Lie: "I'll Take The Under"

One of the biggest “lies” in the financial world is that if you just invest your money in the markets over the long-term, you will average 7, 8 or 10% a year. Asset-gatherers don't give enough credence to the long-term effects of the “when” you start your investing cycle. The primary problem is that investors DO NOT have 100-years to invest BEFORE their disbursement cycle begins. Unfortunately, with stock valuations pushing the second highest level in history, forward return expectations (before inflation, taxes, and expenses) are extremely low.

The Full Details Behind Monte Paschi's €5 Billion Bail Out

  1. Increase the coverage ratio for Bad debt
  2. Transfer all the existing stock of Bad debt into a securitization vehicle. The senior tranche will be covered by government guarantees, Mezzanine will be bought by Atlante fund and the equity tranche will be transferred to existing shareholders and deconsolidated.
  3. A €5bn capital increase to remove the negative capital impact from the operation and maintain capital level at the current level of 11.8%.

When Energy Loans Go Bad: Why America's Largest Bank Is Sliding

Wells' long overdue admission that it is woefully under-reserved for what may be a deluge of loan defaults should oil fail to rebound strongly... and certainly if oil continues to decline, has finally arrived in the form of this chart showing its LTM loan loss provision expense. It is, in a word, soaring.

70% Of German Bonds Are No Longer Eligible For ECB Purchases

The surge in sovereign debt since Britain’s vote to exit the European Union last month has pushed yields on about 70% of the securities in the $1.1-trillion Bloomberg Germany Sovereign Bond Index below the ECB’s -0.4% deposit rate, making them ineligible for the institution’s quantitative-easing program. For the euro area as a whole, the total rises to almost $2 trillion.

With Over $13 Trillion In Negative-Yielding Debt, This Is The Pain A 1% Spike In Rates Would Inflict

There is now $13 trillion of global negative-yielding debt. And, as the WSJ writes, even a small increase in interest rates could inflict hefty losses on investors. With the 2013 "taper tantrum" the Fed sparked a selloff as it discussed ending its bond-buying program known as quantitative easing. A repeat "would be very painful for a lot of people" said J.P. Morgan. This is just how painful.

The Reason For The Relentless Scramble For US Corporate Debt In One Chart

While the $5.9tr US IG corporate bond market represents only 12% of that global market, it is now responsible for 33.0% of its total (effective) yield payment. In other words, nearly one in three (global) dollars paid out in the global IG broad market is paid to investors in the US IG corporate bond market.