Investment Grade

Quantitative Easing And The Corruption Of Corporate America

Since the turn of this century, debt-financed share buybacks have severely tested the character of those charged with growing publicly-traded U.S. firms. Should she ignore the potential for further QE-financed share buybacks to exact more untold economic damage, it would be akin to intentionally corrupting Corporate America. The time, though, has come for these wayward companies’ banker and enabler, the Fed, to hold the line, no matter how difficult the next inevitable test of their character may prove to be. It’s time for the Fed to defend the entire Union and end a civil war that pits a chosen few against the economic freedom of the many.

Monetary Lunacy: The ECB Could End Up Funding Bayer's Purchase Of Monsanto

Today we find an even more striking example of just how broken the global bond market has become thanks to the ECB because as Reuters writes, Bayer could receive financing from none other than the European Central Bank to help fund its takeover of the world's largest seed company, US-based Monsanto, according to the terms of the ECB's bond-buying program.

Deutsche Bank CEO "Very Disappointed" By Moody's Downgrade

For the bank with the tens of trillions in derivatives, being seen as an increasingly more distressed counterparty was not good news and explains why the CEO took the unexpected step of having to defend his firm following the downgrade. "We are very disappointed," Cryan said in an interview on the sidelines of the Institute of International Finance’s conference in Madrid. "We have enough capital to repay all of our debt four-times over."

Why Deutsche Bank Thinks A Fed Rate Hike Would Unleash A Stock Market Crash

"If you think you’ve seen this movie before it’s because you have. Like during 2015, the Fed appears bent on pushing rate expectations higher, and the operative question is whether markets are sufficiently calm for the Fed to use the June 2016 meeting to pave the way for a July hike. We think the answer is no.... and the outlier appears to be the S&P500, where valuations appear excessive given the breakeven/real yield framework."

"We Should Be Concerned" - Stock Buybacks Plunge Most Since 2009

After snapping up trillions of dollars of their own stock in a five-year shopping binge that dwarfed every other buyer, U.S. companies from Apple Inc. to IBM Corp. just put on the brakes. Announced repurchases dropped 38 percent to $244 billion in the last four months, the biggest decline since 2009, data compiled by Birinyi Associates and Bloomberg show. “If the only meaningful source of demand in the market is companies buying their own shares back, then what happens if that goes away?” asked Brad McMillan, CIO of Commonwealth “We should be concerned.”

After Failed Halliburton Deal, Baker Hughes Unveils "Path For The Future" Including $2.5BN Stock, Bond Buyback

While it wasn't exactly breaking news, with consensus having long ago decided that Halliburton and Baker Hughes would ultimately call off their ill-timed $28 billion merger announced in late 2014 following recurring media leaks, overnight the two companies officially ended speculation when they announced that the contested merger would be called off, resulting in a $3.5 billion termination fee payable to Baker Hughes. And with its immediate future somewhat in limbo, moments ago Baker Hughes outlined its "path for the future."

Default Cycle Now In Full Swing As Goodrich Petroleum Is Latest To File Chapter 11

This morning another troubled energy producer, Goodrich Petroleum announced a prepackaged Chapter filing meant to implement a financial reorganization after struggling to restructure its debt amid declining energy prices. This follows the filing of Energy XXI just 24 hours ago. Since the start of 2015, about 50 oil and gas producers have gone bankrupt, owing more than $17 billion, according to law firm Haynes & Boone LLP.

SocGen: "Now We Know Why The Fed Desperately Wants To Avoid A Drop In Equity Markets"

"The catalyst for a balance sheet crisis is rarely the affordability of interest rates, so a 25bp rise in Fed rates is neither here nor there. Credit market risk is about assessing the likelihood of getting your money back. As such asset prices (i.e. equity markets) and asset price risk (i.e. equity volatility) are far bigger concerns. So all you need for a balance sheet crisis is declining equity markets, a phenomenon the Fed appears desperate to avoid. Now we know why."

Deutsche Bank Says World "Past The Point Of No Return" In The Default Cycle

"We continue to live in a low default world for now though. Even though defaults picked up in 2015, B/BB default rates were still comfortably below their long-term average which they have been for well over a decade now with 2009 being the only exception. Indeed last year’s default rate for global Bs (up from 0.9% to 2.7%) was still lower than all of the first two decades of the modern era of leveraged finance up to 2003. So in spite of all the challenges we face this era has been characterized by astonishingly low default rates. There are clear signs the cycle is turning though, especially in the US."