Italy

Eurogroup Head Dashes Italy Bank Bailout Hopes: "I Will Resist Taxpayer Bailouts Very Strongly"

Jeroen Dijsselbloem poured cold water on Italy's ongoing attempts to force a bank bailout when he said earlier today that not only was he not "particularly" worried about italian banks but that “there have always been and will always be bankers that say ’we need more public money to recapitalize our banks.... and I will resist that very strongly because it is, again and again, hitting on the taxpayer." He then added that "the problems with the banks need to be sorted out in the banks and by banks.”

Frontrunning: July 11

  • Global stocks rise as markets anticipate stimulus (Reuters)
  • Global Stocks Buoyed by Rally in Japan (WSJ)
  • Andrea Leadsom Pulls Out of Conservative Party Leadership Race (WSJ)
  • More protesters arrested, police say Dallas sniper plotted bigger assault (Reuters)
  • Voters Add to Election Turmoil by Threatening to Jump Party Lines (WSJ)

S&P 500 To Open At All Time Highs After Japan Soars, Yen Plunges On JPY10 Trillion Stimulus

S&P 500 futures are set to open at new all time highs, with global stocks rallying as the yen weakened and the Nikkei soared on speculation Japan is about to unveil the first instance of "helicopter money"-lite, as well as due to a continuation of better-than-expected U.S. jobs data. Further speculation that Italy's (and Europe's) insolvent banks will be bailed out has further boosted sentiment.

Deutsche Bank's Chief Economist Calls For €150 Billion Bailout Of European Banks

David Folkerts-Landau, the chief economist of Deutsche Bank, has called for a multi-billion dollar bailout for European banks. Speaking to Germany's Welt am Sonntag, the economist said European institutions should get fresh capital for a recapitalization following a similar bailout in the US. What he didn't say is that the US bailout took place nearly a decade ago, in the meantime Europe's financial sector was supposed to be fixed courtesy of "prudent" fiscal and monetary policy. It wasn't.

Russell Napier Reveals The "Only Question That Matters For Global Investors"

Only one question matters for global investors - Where is the helicopter? Helicopter money will be raining from the skies in Japan, the Eurozone, the UK and even in the USA. This form of reflation will likely work and in due course work too much. Few things are binary in investment, but this huge decision to be taken in Berlin is the biggest binary event for investors this analyst has yet come across.

US Sends Another 1,000 Troops To Poland As Part Of NATO Effort To Counter Russia

The most important development from today's NATO summit in Poland was Obama's announcement that the U.S. is sending an additional 1,000 U.S. troops to Poland as part of a NATO effort to reinforce its presence on the alliance's eastern flank. The U.S.-led battalion is one of four that NATO will begin rotating through the region. The move is meant to act as a deterrent to Russia, AP adds.

Frontrunning: July 8

  • Snipers kill five Dallas police; Obama calls it 'despicable' attack (Reuters)
  • Global stocks regain ground, Treasury near record low as U.S. jobs data looms (Reuters)
  • House Republicans Push for New Hillary Clinton Investigation (WSJ)
  • Obama urges NATO to stand firm against Russia despite Brexit (Reuters)
  • Kremlin says NATO talk of Russian threat absurd, short-sighted (Reuters)

US Futures Rebound After Volatile Session, All Eyes On June Payrolls

In a session where bleary-eyed traders followed the all-night tragic developments out of Dallas and initially sold off risk assets, it is good to see that some normalcy prevailed with the traditional post Europe-open futures ramp, which was further assisted by the successful resolution of the Dallas standoff, which has pushed futures modestly higher ahead of today's main event for markets, the June payrolls report due in under two hours.

Europe's Bank Crisis Arrives In Germany: €29 Billion Bremen Landesbank On The Verge Of Failure

It appears that some shipping loans gone bad could be the catalyst for Europe's banking crisis to finally breach the most impenetrable border of all, that of Germany. Because it is in Germany where we find what may be the next domino to fall as part of Europe's latest banking crisis incarnation: Bremen Landesbank, whose contingent convertible bonds have just cratered as a result of speculation that the bank's bailout is suddenly in jeopardy.