Jan Hatzius

Goldman Raises March Rate Hike Odds To 95% After Yellen Speech

"Fed Chair Yellen said today that a rate increase at the March FOMC meeting “would likely be appropriate”, as long as incoming data continue to confirm officials’ outlook. We see this as a strong signal for action at the upcoming meeting, and have raised our subjective odds of a hike to 95%."

Goldman: "The Improvement In Global Growth Has Run Its Course"

"The more negative aspects of the Trump agenda—trade and immigration—are coming into clearer view. Taken together, our analysis suggests that the improvement in global growth has probably run its course, with sideways moves around the recent 3½% trend the most likely outcome."

Three Things Are About To Derail Trump's Fiscal Plan, Goldman Warns

With every passing week Goldman has been turning increasingly more pessimistic on Trump's proposed fiscal and budget plans, and it all culminated in a report released over the weekend, in which Goldman's Alec Phillips explains that over the next few months fiscal reofrm watchers will be disappointed as "three factors will make this year’s budget plans even more difficult to put together."

Wall Street Responds To Today's Jobs Report

Following today's jobs report, the market's reaction to the unexpectedly strong January payrolls visualized in the charts below, is straightforward: the disappointing wage growth is an indication that the Fed may not hike rates for quite a bit longer than expected, and will likely will be forced to reduce its rate hike expectations from 3 to 2 (in line with the market) or fewer if wage growth continue to stagnate.

Goldman's 10 Most Important Questions For 2017

Goldman Sachs is relatively optimistic about growth in 2017, for three reasons: first, despite the lack of spare capacity, US recession risk remains below the historical average; second, financial conditions should remain a growth tailwind - at least in the first half of 2017; and third, we expect a fiscal easing accumulating to 1% of GDP by 2018. However, uncertainty remains and here is what Jan Hatzius and his team believe are the ten most important questions for 2017.

Will Trump Fire Janet Yellen? Here Is Wall Street's Response

One of the burning questions troubling Wall Street this morning is whether president elect Donald Trump plans on reshuffling the Fed, eliminating its so-called "independent" and perhaps going so far as firing or "requesting" Janet Yellen's resignation. to answer the question whether or not Yellen's role is in jeopardy, we went to the two most authoritative sources available: JPM and Goldman.

Goldman Cuts S&P500 Earnings Forecasts For The Next Three Years

"We cut our S&P 500 earnings estimates for each of the next several years. Our revised operating EPS forecasts now equal $105 (2016), $116 (2017), and $122 (2018) reflecting annual growth of 5%, 10%, and 5%, respectively. Low interest rates and peaking margins constrain profit growth in Information Technology, Financials, and Telecom and drive the reduction in our index-level EPS forecast." - Goldman Sachs

Goldman Slashes September Rate-Hike Odds As Hilsenrath Warns Of Divided Fed

Goldman Sachs' estimate of September rate-hike odds continue to collapse faster than Hillary Clinton as the absence of a clear signal from a series of speeches by Fed officials (concluding with Lael Brainard's headfake). Goldman have reduced their subjective odds for a hike next week to 25% from 40% previously (still above market expectations of 13%) but remains hopeful for December. However, as Fed-whisperer WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath warns, Yellen faces record levels of dissent as she "confronts a divided group of policy-makers."

Goldman Cuts September Rate Hike Odds To 40%, Just Days After Raising Them To 55%

Goldman: "we are lowering our subjective odds of a rate increase at the September FOMC meeting from 55% to 40%. We are nudging up the odds of a rate increase at the December meeting to 30% from 25%, but taking the cumulative odds for at least one hike this year down to 70% from 80%. With slightly softer data and less “time on the clock”, a rate increase this year now looks a bit less certain, in our view."