Jan Hatzius

Goldman's 10 Most Important Questions For 2017

Goldman Sachs is relatively optimistic about growth in 2017, for three reasons: first, despite the lack of spare capacity, US recession risk remains below the historical average; second, financial conditions should remain a growth tailwind - at least in the first half of 2017; and third, we expect a fiscal easing accumulating to 1% of GDP by 2018. However, uncertainty remains and here is what Jan Hatzius and his team believe are the ten most important questions for 2017.

Will Trump Fire Janet Yellen? Here Is Wall Street's Response

One of the burning questions troubling Wall Street this morning is whether president elect Donald Trump plans on reshuffling the Fed, eliminating its so-called "independent" and perhaps going so far as firing or "requesting" Janet Yellen's resignation. to answer the question whether or not Yellen's role is in jeopardy, we went to the two most authoritative sources available: JPM and Goldman.

Goldman Cuts S&P500 Earnings Forecasts For The Next Three Years

"We cut our S&P 500 earnings estimates for each of the next several years. Our revised operating EPS forecasts now equal $105 (2016), $116 (2017), and $122 (2018) reflecting annual growth of 5%, 10%, and 5%, respectively. Low interest rates and peaking margins constrain profit growth in Information Technology, Financials, and Telecom and drive the reduction in our index-level EPS forecast." - Goldman Sachs

Goldman Slashes September Rate-Hike Odds As Hilsenrath Warns Of Divided Fed

Goldman Sachs' estimate of September rate-hike odds continue to collapse faster than Hillary Clinton as the absence of a clear signal from a series of speeches by Fed officials (concluding with Lael Brainard's headfake). Goldman have reduced their subjective odds for a hike next week to 25% from 40% previously (still above market expectations of 13%) but remains hopeful for December. However, as Fed-whisperer WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath warns, Yellen faces record levels of dissent as she "confronts a divided group of policy-makers."

Goldman Cuts September Rate Hike Odds To 40%, Just Days After Raising Them To 55%

Goldman: "we are lowering our subjective odds of a rate increase at the September FOMC meeting from 55% to 40%. We are nudging up the odds of a rate increase at the December meeting to 30% from 25%, but taking the cumulative odds for at least one hike this year down to 70% from 80%. With slightly softer data and less “time on the clock”, a rate increase this year now looks a bit less certain, in our view."

"Blunt Language" - Goldman Explains Why It Is So Confident The Fed Will Hike In Under 3 Weeks

"Nothing happens without a good reason in these speeches, especially as far as monetary policy signals are concerned. The phrasing “case…has strengthened” was blunt language for a Fed Chair, which would have been unnecessary if she was only trying to convey a general sense that rates would be moving higher over time. There are plenty of other opportunities to prepare markets for a move before the December meeting."

Goldman Says Weak Payrolls "Just Enough For September Hike", Raises Odds From 40% To 55%

Growth in nonfarm payrolls was weaker than consensus estimates at +151k, but above the pace Fed officials typically consider sufficient to hold the unemployment rate steady over time—the so called “breakeven rate”. We therefore see this report as just enough for a large majority of officials to support a September rate increase. We have therefore raised our subjective odds of a hike this month to 55% from 40%.

Goldman: "Yellen Remarks Point To Higher Odds Of September Hike", Market Disagrees

With pundits unable to decide if Yellen's speech was hawkish or dovish, we need a tiebreaker, and as always the best one is the bank that has spawned more central bankers than any other institution, Goldman Sachs. As such, according to the just released analysis of Goldman's Jan Hatzius, the Fed speech "raised the odds of a rate increase at the September FOMC meeting," but he adds that "any action will depend on the result of next week's jobs report. "

Goldman "Explains" Why Yellen Lost Credibility: "In Our View, The Fed Has Been Unlucky"

"The May 18 minutes surprised virtually everyone by guiding strongly toward a rate hike in June or July, and Chair Yellen reinforced this message in her remarks at Harvard University on May 27. But the weak May employment report released on June 3 and increased concern about the UK referendum again triggered a sharp pivot, putting on hold the notion of further hikes. These dramatic shifts have frustrated many market participants. In our view, the Fed has been unlucky."

Goldman Now Sees A Two-Thirds Chance Of A Rate Hike In 2016

US employment growth rebounded sharply in June, according to Goldman's Jan Hatzius, and as a result, the bank confirms their expectation of about a two-thirds chance that the FOMC will raise rates this year, most likely in December... notably different from market expectations.

Goldman Responds To Yellen's Testimony: "Little New Ground"

"Chair Yellen broke little new ground in testimony before the Senate Banking Committee. She remained upbeat about the economic outlook, but said that the FOMC would need to watch incoming labor market data to determine whether recent signs of slowing are indeed transitory."

And The Winner Of Euro 2016 According To Goldman Is...

Shortly before Brazil's crushing 7-1 defeat to Germany in 2014's World Cup, Goldman Sachs econometric model forecast the South American team as by far the strongest favorite to lift football's soccer's greatest trophy. So, with that in mind, Jan Hatzius and his hooligans unleash their predictions for the 2016 European Football Championship that just got under way. Using historical performance data for each team - most importantly the Elo rating system originally devised to rank chess players - they estimate a set of probabilities that a particular team will reach a particular round, up to and including the championship... concluding that France (the hosts) are the most likely to win. Bet accordingly.

Goldman Crushes Democrat's Dreams: Shows Obamacare Has Cost "A Few Hundred Thousand Jobs"

We suspect Lloyd Blankfein will be receiving a call from The White House (or Treasury) very soon as Goldman Sachs' economists did the unthinkable in the age of political correctness - while investigating the state of under-employment in America, the smartest people in the room found that ObamaCare has led to a rise in involuntary part-time employment, estimating that "a few hundred thousand workers" have been forced to cut hours and has "created disincentives for full-time employment."