Japanification

Why One Trader Thinks Calls For A Yield Rebound Are Wrong

After the U.S. 10-year yield fell to just above 2%, what’s next? It’d be easy to say it should snap back to a range of 2.3% to 2.5%, especially after it jumped at Monday’s open. But that’d be too boring. That’s the consensus view. Here are the reasons the world benchmark for borrowing costs can drop below 2%.

ECB Slashes Inflation Forecasts For 2017-2019

As previevwed in yesterday's Bloomberg "trial balloon", moments ago the ECB slashed its inflation forecast for the entire forward guidance period, taking inflation projections lower anywhere between 0.1% and 0.3% for the years 2017-2019.

S&P 500 To Open At All Time Highs After Japan Soars, Yen Plunges On JPY10 Trillion Stimulus

S&P 500 futures are set to open at new all time highs, with global stocks rallying as the yen weakened and the Nikkei soared on speculation Japan is about to unveil the first instance of "helicopter money"-lite, as well as due to a continuation of better-than-expected U.S. jobs data. Further speculation that Italy's (and Europe's) insolvent banks will be bailed out has further boosted sentiment.

How Peak Debt Constrains The Fed From Moving Rates Higher

As soon as the Fed moves money market rates upwards, unproductive parts of the economy will come under severe strain which in turn sets in motion recessionary forces prompting the Fed to reverse course. The only way out is to realize that the world is awash in mal-invested capital that need to be written off. Since that is inconceivable for today’s vested interests, the way forward will be further “Japanification” of the global economy. And this time we are all out of arrows.

The Death Of Monetary Policy (In 1 Dismal Chart)

Perhaps "The Japanification of Monetary Policy" would have been a more appropriate title... "well it didn't work for them, so we should all try more of it" appears to be the repost of policy-makers worldwide which, inevitably, will lead to the total collpase of their credibility (and th every 'faith' of the world's investors shattered).

"The Entire Theory Of Monetarism Is Coming Undone In Spectacular And Empirical Fashion"

The entire theory of monetarism is coming undone in spectacular and empirical fashion, which leaves the entire status quo exposed. All that is left in defense is the same old refrain of “it wasn’t big enough.” That’s great for those in the ivory towers blinding themselves to the reality of a lost generation of Italians, Spaniards, French and now even Germans; a listing to which even the FOMC is worried may yet add Americans. Why anyone ever expected a different outcome is due solely to unrepentant ideology, since these central banks are following almost exactly the Japanese “model.”

Bob Janjuah: Forget Rate Hikes, "We May Well Need QE4 From The Fed"

I realise that it is not normal to have a bearish risk view for December through to mid-January. Normally markets tend to ramp up in December and early January before selling off later in January. But this year I do think things are different. One look at the moves in core bond markets over 2014, when almost everyone I talked to had been bearish bonds, paints a stunning picture. I would entitle this picture ‘The Victory of Deflation’, or (as many folks now talk about (but still generally dismiss)) ‘The Japanification of the World’. I may end up eating my words in 2015 if the US consumer does come through, but if he or she does not, then we may well need QE4 from the Fed to battle the incredibly strong headwinds of deflation around the world. And I will revert on this subject, but to me the coming ECB QE and more BOJ QE are woefully inadequate substitutes for USD Fed QE.

And The Person Responsible For Japan's Economic Endgame Is... Paul Krugman

There are two words that should strike fear in the hearts of any rational-thinking citizen of the world - Paul Krugman. Wondering why? As Alhambra's Jeff Snider notes, we already know of at least one respect where Krugman (as a stand-in at least for the Keynesian perspective that is somehow still widely shared, especially in the orthodox economist class) has impacted 'stimulus' activity, Sweden. And now his appearance in Japan enabled what Japanese economists call a "historic meeting," as Bloomberg reports that Abe met with the Nobel-prize winner for 40 minutes who "helped the prime minister make up his mind," that delaying the fiscally-responsible tax-hikes was the right thing to do (and increasing QQE) or Japan "wouldn’t escape deflation." Mission Accomplished... and if it fails, moar will be needed and 'capitalism' will be blamed.