JPMorgan Chase

What Benefits To Savers? Banks Rush To Hike Prime Rate To 3.50%, Forget To Increase Deposit Rate

Someone forgot to give the banks the memo that the Fed's first rate hike since 2006 was supposed to, at least on paper, benefit the savers of America and not so much the, well, banks.. Because the ink hadn't even dried on the Fed's statement and one after another banks revealed that they would promptly boost their Prime lending rate from the current benchmark of 3.25% to the new Fed Funds-implied prime rate of 3.50%.

"It Is All Rather Scary" - Chinese Debt Snowball Gaining Momentum

Financial crises can happen quickly, like the bursting of the tech stock bubble in early 2000, or slowly, like the late-1980s junk bond bust. The shape of the crash depends mostly on the asset in question: Equities can plunge literally overnight, while bonds and bank loans can take a while to reach critical mass. China’s bursting bubble is of the second type. "If, as seems likely, the government has succeeded in getting funding to higher risk sectors by relaxing bond approvals," wrote Christopher Wood of brokerage CLSA in a recent note, "it is all rather scary, given the regulatory failures exposed by the A share boom-bust cycle."

"People Are Voting With Their Feet": PIMCO No Longer EM Bond King As Fund's AUM Tumbles 62%

Amid souring bets on Brazil and the general malaise across EM, PIMCO has been dethroned as the king of emerging market bonds. A fund run by Ireland-incorporated Stone Harbor has overtaken PIMCO's EM Local Bond Fund as the world's largest emerging market fixed income fund by AUM as rollercoaster bets on Brazil and the departure of both El-Erian and Gross weighs on investor sentiment.

Frontrunning: November 18

  • Security jitters drive European investors back to safe havens (Reuters)
  • Global Anti-ISIS Alliance Begins to Emerge (WSJ)
  • Merkel says cancelling soccer match was 'responsible' decision (Reuters)
  • Paris attacker may have had accomplice on journey through Balkans (Reuters)
  • Drop Assad demands if you want to unite against Islamic State: Russia to West (Reuters)
  • Putin sets up commission to combat terrorism financing (Reuters)

Frontrunning: November 5

  • BOE Stays Cautious on Rate-Hike Timing as Inflation Outlook Cut (BBG)
  • China Enters Bull Market (WSJ)
  • Britain says Islamic State likely brought down Russian plane (Reuters)
  • Dollar jumps as markets fix on December rate expectations (Reuters)
  • Activist Investor Bill Ackman Plays Defense (WSJ)
  • BOJ Survey Data Reveals Signs of Growing Inequality in Japan (BBG)
  • UAW Warns of General Motors Strike If Workers Fail to Approve Contract (WSJ)

AsiaPac Calm Before BoJ Storm, Japanese Household Spending 'Unexpectedly' Drops As China Releveraging Continues

As all eyes, ears, and noses anxiously await the scantest of dovishness from Kuroda and The BoJ tonight (despite numerous hints that they will not unleash moar for now), the data that was just delivered may have helped the bad-news-is-good-news case. Most notably Japanese household spending dropped 0.4% YoY (with tax hike issues out of the way) missing expectations by a mile as the 'deflationary' mindset remains mired in Japanese heads. AsiaPac stocks are hovering at the week's lows unable to mount any bid as China fixed the Yuan notably stronger and instigated a new central pricing plan for pork prices (which suggests concerns about inflation domestically). Once again Chinese margin debt reaches a new 8-week high as 'stability' has prompted releveraging among the farmers and grandmas.

Just When You Thought Wall Street's Heist Couldn't Get Any Crazier...

In reading various recent regulatory reports, it is clear that almost none of the promises that were made to the public about what was going to happen under Dodd-Frank financial reform is actually happening. Welcome to another day at the casino where the model continues to be — heads they win, tails you lose.

Frontrunning: October 21

  • Global Stock Markets Edge Higher Though Global Growth Concerns Weigh (WSJ)
  • Nikkei up 1.9% because Japan export growth slows sharply, raising fears of recession (Reuters)
  • Saudis Risk Draining Financial Assets in 5 Years, IMF Says (BBG)
  • Syria's Assad flies to Moscow to thank Russia's Putin for air strikes (Reuters)
  • US Prosecutor Preet Bharara Probing Daily Fantasy-Sports Business (WSJ)
  • Syrian army denies Russian ground forces fighting in Syria (Reuters)

Economists Stunned By "Irrational Consumers" Who Used Gas Savings To Buy More Expensive Gas

While we knew the quantitative answer to the biggest conundrum stumping economists, namely that Americans bought even more gas with their gas savings, we were missing the qualitative one. Courtesy of the NYT we now learn that not only did consumers not redirect their spending to other discretionary items, but engaged in an act that has stunned economists around the globe: they don’t just buy more gasoline; they bought more expensive gasoline!

"The Bankers Have Gone Through This Before. They Know How It Ends, And It’s Not Pretty"

Oil companies have sold $61.5 billion in stocks and bonds since January as oil prices have tumbled. However, the fees geneated are a tiny fraction of the bank's real exposure to the energy sector, at over $150 billion. So have the banks learned their lesson?  "The bankers have gone through this before,” says Oscar Gruss’s Meyer. “They know how it works out in the end, and it’s not pretty." Then again, perhaps banks are just sailing on an ocean of liquidity allowing them to postpone the day of Mark to Market reckoning, especially since this time, everyone is in it together....

There Goes The Final Pillar Of The US "Recovery": The Loan-Growth Paradox Explained

One year ago we reported that companies were using secured bank debt to repurchase stock: a stunning, foolhardy development. It so unbelievable we promptly forgot this bizarre tangent into "use of loan funds"... Until today when we found that it was, indeed, all a lie and that the banks themselves had become complicit in perpetuating not only the worst possible capital misallocation, but being an accessory to the US stagnation, soon to be replaced with full-blown recession.

BlackRock Warns Of "Land Mines" As Benefits Of Lower Yields For Corporate Issuers Fades

As we have warned numerous times - and any trader old enough to have actually lived through a credit cycle can attest to - there is only so much releveraging shareholder-friendly exuberance firms can do before the company's balance sheet becomes questionable. That inflection point has come for US equities. The deterioration of balance-sheet health is "increasingly alarming" and will only worsen if earnings growth continues to stall amid a global economic slowdown, according to Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan's Eric Beinstein warns "the benefit of lower yields for corporate issuers is fading." The weakness is widespread as BlackRock fears "you’ll continue to see some land mines out there."

Frontrunning: October 14

  • Democratic rivals back Clinton on emails, but little else in scrappy debate (Reuters)
  • Hillary Clinton Shows Relentless Efficiency in First Democratic Debate (WSJ)
  • U.S. Examines Goldman Sachs Role in 1MDB Transactions (WSJ)
  • JPMorgan Says Trading Pain Isn't Over After Third-Quarter Slump (BBG)
  • Islamic State battles insurgents near Aleppo as army prepares assault (Reuters)
  • Oil Slide Means `Almost Everything' for Sale as Deals Accelerate (BBG)

Frontrunning: October 13

  • Playboy to Drop Nudity as Internet Fills Demand (NYT)
  • Stock futures fall on weak China trade data (Reuters)
  • Any Hall is down 20% YTD (WSJ)
  • Global Stocks Slide With Metals After Chinese Imports Tumble (BBG)
  • Clinton's tack to the left to be on display in Democratic debate (Reuters)
  • Switzerland Said to Impose 5% Leverage Ratio on Big Banks (BBG)
  • AB InBev, SABMiller brew up $100 billion deal (Reuters)