• GoldCore
    07/25/2014 - 09:41
    The EU and global drive toward bail-ins continues unabated. Bail-ins are coming to financial institutions and banks in the EU, UK, U.S. and much of the western world - with painful consequences for...

Krugman

Bruce Krasting's picture

Soak Wealth, Not Income?





The health of the economy is driven by after tax income. We need a big tax increase that does not reduce current income. My plan.

 
GoldCore's picture

Today Is Best Day to Buy Gold - Thackray's 2012 Investor's Guide





Today's AM fix was USD 1565.50, EUR 1281.10 and GBP 1011.96 per ounce.
Yesterday’s AM fix was USD 1576.50, EUR 1284 and GBP 1012.91 per ounce.

Gold rose by 0.5% in New York yesterday and closed up $8.20 to $1,576.60/oz. Silver rose 0.93% or 25 cents to close at $27.09/oz.

Gold gradually ticked lower in Asian trading and has seen further slight weakness in European trading. Still robust physical demand is supporting gold at these levels and strong support is at the $1,500/oz level. 

 
williambanzai7's picture

DiD SoMeBoDY SaY KRuGMaN?





Or Chicken Stim?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Krugman vs CNBC: Round 1





This one is tough: Krugman or CNBC... Krugman or CNBC... Hmmm.

 
CrownThomas's picture

David Frum Hearts the Fed, Hates Mises





This wouldn't be nearly as comical if it weren't for the fact that Frum is a distant cousin of none other than Paul Krugman

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Ultimate Krugman Take-Down





Forget Ali - Frazier; ignore Santelli - Liesman; dismiss Yankees - Red Sox; never mind Silva - Sonnen; the new undisputed standard by which all showdowns will be judged happened in Spain over the weekend. During a debate on Europe's crisis, Pedro Schwartz (a mild-mannered Spanish 'Austrian' economics professor) took on the heavyweight Paul 'I coulda been a Fed Chair contender' Krugman, and - in our humble opinion - wiped the floor with his Keynesian philosophy. From the medicinal use of more debt to fix too much debt, to the Japanization of world economies and the demand-side bias of every- and any-thing - interested only in the short-term economic growth; the gentlemanly Spaniard notes, with regard to the European crisis, the fact that "Keynesians got us into this mess and now we have to sacrifice our principals so that they can get us out of this mess". Humble and generous in his praise - though definitively serious with his criticism - Schwartz opines: "Often Nobel prize winners are tempted to pontificate on matters that are outside the specialty in which they have excelled," noting "the mantle of authority whereby what ever they say - whether sensible or not - is accepted with resignation from some and enthusiasm by others." Krugman's red-faced anger is evident at the conclusion as he even refused to shake Schwartz's hand after the debate. Absolute must watch!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Economic Report Card - Fail





This scathing assessment of Obama’s economic policies is by no means an endorsement of Mitt Romney or his economic plan, since he has never provided a detailed economic plan. After four years of a Romney presidency, the national debt will also be $20 trillion as his war with Iran and handouts to his Wall Street brethren replace Obama’s food stamps and entitlement pork. There was only one presidential candidate whose proposals would have placed this country back on a sustainable path. The plutocracy controlled corporate mainstream media did their part in ignoring and then scorning Ron Paul during his truth telling campaign. The plutocracy wants to retain their wealth and power, while the willfully ignorant masses don’t want to think. The words of Ron Paul sum up what will occur over the coming years as the interchangeable pieces of this corporate fascist farce drive the country to ruin.  The politicians, bankers and corporate titans running this country are too corrupt and cowardly to reverse the course on our path to destruction. The debt will continue to accumulate until our Minsky Moment. At that point the U.S. dollar will be rejected and chaos will reign. The Great American Empire will be no more. At that time sides will need to be chosen and blood will begin to spill. Decades of bad decisions, corruption, cowardice, ignorance, greed and sloth will come to a head.

The verdict of history will not be kind to the once great American Empire.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Steve Keen On Why Debt Matters "All The Time" And The Need For "Quantitative Easing For The Public"





Following his somewhat epic blog debate with Paul Krugman, Steve Keen appears on Capital Account with Lauren Lyster to debunk more Keynesian propaganda and the kleptocratic status quo 'debt doesn't matter' arguments. Poking holes in the stable/exogenous shock equilibrium 'model' versus the real-world's dynamic systems, the Aussie economist warms up with the zero-interest rate conundrum and liquidity trap; moves on to the empirical falseness of the debt-to-unemployment relationship - implying 'debt matters all the time' as Keen explains common-sensibly (but not Neoclassically) that the 'change in debt adds to demand' and that involves banks which breaks modern economic theory (since lending is credit creation not savings transfer). Echoing the deleveraging from the Great Depression, it could take 15 years of unwinding this epic debt bubble before its all over - but not if the status quo of deficit spending is maintained - as Keen somewhat controversially concludes: "you can't just cure this with deficit spending [since debt is already beyond the black-hole's 'event horizon'], you have to abolish the private debt as well" by "quantitative easing for the public".

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: They Don’t Call Them Real Interest Rates For Nothing





The idea that short-duration bond funds are a good bet due to “the FED’s complete control with regards to suppressing and maintaining short-term interest rates” is completely wrong on every level; they’ve been a losing investment in real terms for most of the last 5 years, and the Fed is determined to keep it that way. The Fed’s control over nominal interest rates is precisely the reason that I wouldn’t want to invest in treasuries; not only has it consistently made bonds into a real losing proposition, but it also creates a good deal of systemic currency risk. Simply, the Fed will — in the pursuit of low-rates — monetise to the point of endangering the dollar’s already-under-threat reserve currency status. The only things that would turn bonds into a winning proposition — rising interest rates, or deflation — are anathema to the Fed, and explicitly opposed by every dimension of current Fed policy. Of course, creating artificial demand for treasuries to control nominal rates has blowback; if the buyers are not there, the Fed must inflate the currency. Hiding inflation is hard, so it is preferable to a central bank that old money is used; this is why Japan has mandated that financial institutions buy treasuries, and why I fear that if we continue on this trajectory, that the United States and other Western economies may do the same thing.

 
EconMatters's picture

Icelandic Miracle or Mirage? Round 2





Debate between Krugman and the CFR rages on in round 2 on whether currency devaluation created the Icelandic Miracle or Mirage.  

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 2





  • The Real Victor in Brussels Was Merkel (FT)
  • German Dominance in Doubt after Summit Defeat (Spiegel)
  • Euro defeat for Merkel? Only time will tell (Reuters)
  • The Twilight Zone has nothing on Europe: European Banks Bolster Capital With Shunned Bonds (Bloomberg)
  • Krugman is baaaaaack and demands even more debt: Europe’s Great Illusion (NYT)
  • Republicans See Way to Repeal Obamacare (FT)
  • Hollande Ready to Tackle Public Finances (FT)
  • China’s Manufacturing Growth Weakens as New Orders Drop (Bloomberg)
  • Protesters March in Hong Kong as Leung Vows to Fight Poverty (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Whitewashing The Economic Establishment





Brad DeLong makes an odd claim:

So the big lesson is simple: trust those who work in the tradition of Walter Bagehot, Hyman Minsky, and Charles Kindleberger. That means trusting economists like Paul Krugman, Paul Romer, Gary Gorton, Carmen Reinhart, Ken Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan, Larry Summers, Barry Eichengreen, Olivier Blanchard, and their peers. Just as they got the recent past right, so they are the ones most likely to get the distribution of possible futures right.

Larry Summers? If we’re going to base our economic policy on trusting in Larry Summers, should we not reappoint Greenspan as Fed Chairman? Or — better yet — appoint Charles Ponzi as head of the SEC? Or a fox to guard the henhouse? Or a tax cheat as Treasury Secretary? Or a war criminal as a peace ambassador? (Yes — reality is more surreal than anything I could imagine).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 28





  • Funny WSJ headline: Berlin Blinks on Shared Debt  (WSJ)... sure: if XO hits 1000 bps tomorrow, Eurobonds in 2 days
  • Barclays $451 Million Libor Fine Paves Way for Competitors (Bloomberg)
  • Fed officials differ on whether more easing needed (Reuters)
  • China Local Government Finances Are Unsustainable, Auditor Says (Bloomberg)
  • Just because the NYT is not enough, Krugman has now metastasized to the FT: A manifesto for economic sense (FT)
  • Merkel dubs quick bond solutions ‘eyewash’ (FT)
  • Yuan trade settlements encouraged in SAR (China Daily)
  • Katrina Comeback Makes New Orleans Fastest-Growing City (Bloomberg)
  • European Leaders Seek to Overcome Divisions at Summit (Bloomberg)
 
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