Larry Kudlow

"10 Things Learned From 3 Days In Washington D.C."

I have met three types of people here in Washington DC. There are the Trump supporters, who seem to be wildly optimistic. On the other hand, as I look out my window here at the Capital Hilton, I see hundreds if not thousands of protesters walking by wearing little pink hats, and they are decidedly not happy. The third group is much smaller and consists of those who are actually aware of the amount of work that is going to have to be done and who recognize what a daunting task it will be.

'Austrians' At The Fed?

Most financial journalists are not good, and in fact are wedded to a pro-Fed, pro-state ideology that subconsciously permeates everything they write. They are hopelessly unobjective, the naive products of their education and training. The world needs real diversity of thought and opinion, not the fake kind being discussed at the Fed.

America's 24/7 Circus Maximus

Perplexed global public opinion holds its breath at the (circus) best American “democracy” is able to conjure.

Knave Dave's picture

Trump's corporate tax cut is the largest in US history, but it's another giveaway to the top 10%, including himself. It comes with no constraints so it will be spent on more stock buybacks and bigger bonuses. If you want a place at the table, you're going to have to fight for it; otherwise, you can stay below with the rest of the dying middle class and lick up the crumbs.

"It's Not Some Barbarous Relic" - Trump Adviser Urges Return To Gold Standard

".. we need a fundamental reassessment of the global monetary order... in terms of gold being involved, I see it as a sophisticated, forward-looking approach because gold is neutral, it’s universal, and it’s a well-accepted monetary surrogate that transcends borders and time. If you look at the foreign reserves of the most important countries, they keep them mostly in gold. I don’t want to read too much into it, but it proves that gold is not some barbarous relic."

The New "Hope"

What you think about the market doesn’t matter. What everyone thinks about the market (the consensus) doesn’t matter. What matters is what everyone thinks that everyone thinks about the market, and the way you get ahead of this game is to track the “Missionary statements” of politicians, pundits, and bankers made through the four media microphones where the Common Knowledge of markets is created: The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Bloomberg, and CNBC. Today the investment hope that has crystalized into an investment theme is the notion that soon, just around the corner now, perhaps as a result of the next mystery-shrouded meeting of the world’s central bankers, perhaps as a result of the U.S. election this November, we will enjoy a coordinated global infrastructure spending boom.