Market Crash

"The Stock Market Won't Crash, Yet" - The Barron's Cover Strikes Again

When it comes to Wall Street cover page superstitions, nothing beats the Barron's front page article jinx: just when you think something will never happen, Barron's confirms it on the cover, virtually assuring that it does. In which case, be afraid bulls, be very afraid, because if past is prologue Barron's just green-lit the next crash.

Here's Why All Pension Funds Are Doomed, Doomed, Doomed

It's looking increasingly likely that third time's the charm: this set of bubbles is the last one central banks can blow. And when markets free-fall and don't reflate into new bubbles, pension funds will expire, as they were fated to do the day central banks chose zero interest rates forever as their cure for a broken economic model.

Are Investors Idiots?

Statistically, the likelihood of a crash coming on any given day is small. But that is a little like telling a turkey not to worry because the likelihood of Thanksgiving is only 1 out of 365.

Theranos, Facebook, And Unicorns: Why The Real Problems Have Just Begun In Earnest

Many “unicorns” have ceased to be race-worthy a long time ago, but the narrative has been desperately held up reminiscent of a Potemkin village for these last 18 months or more with hopes, prayers, and breathtaking fairy-tales bordering on outright fraud in hopes that maybe, just maybe, they’ll make it to an IPO and shed all that dead weight of having to holdup this house-of-cards pretension any longer. It’s quite possible not only is that race never going to restart.

Why Deutsche Bank Thinks A Fed Rate Hike Would Unleash A Stock Market Crash

"If you think you’ve seen this movie before it’s because you have. Like during 2015, the Fed appears bent on pushing rate expectations higher, and the operative question is whether markets are sufficiently calm for the Fed to use the June 2016 meeting to pave the way for a July hike. We think the answer is no.... and the outlier appears to be the S&P500, where valuations appear excessive given the breakeven/real yield framework."