Market Timing

Tyler Durden's picture

Visualizing The Market Cycle





Like many controversial topics in investing, there is no real professional consensus on market timing. Academics claim that it’s not possible, while traders and chartists swear by the idea. That said, as VisualCapitalist's Jeff Desjardins notes, one thing that everyone can probably agree on is that markets are cyclical and that securities do have recurring chart patterns. They aren’t predictable all of the time, but learning the fundamentals around market cycles can only help an investor in furthering their understanding of how things work.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A Major Warning From Tom McClellan : "Can This Possibly End Well?"





"VIX futures ETF extremely popular now. Can this possibly end well?" - Tom McClellan

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Cycles, Bounces, & The Only Question That Matters





Unfortunately, when central-planners "drag forward" future consumption today, you leave a "void" in the future that must be filled. That future "void" continues to expand each time activity is dragged forward until, inevitably, it can not be filled. This is currently being witnessed in the overall data trends as seen in the deterioration in corporate earnings and revenues. The only question is whether Central Banks can continue to support asset prices long enough for the economic cycle to catch up. Historically, such is a feat that has never been accomplished.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The New New 'Deal' - "Markets Are Too Important To Be Left To Investors"





In the same way that FDR had an existential political interest in generating inflation and preventing volatility in the US labor market, so does the US Executive branch today (regardless of what party holds the office) have an existential political interest in generating inflation and preventing volatility in the US capital markets. Transforming Wall Street into a political utility was an afterthought for FDR; today the relative importance of the labor markets and capital markets have completely switched positions. Today, the quote would be "markets are too important to be left to investors."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Buy High, Sell Low" - The Psychology Of Loss





The reality of loss will be more than most can stomach and sentiments of “time in the market” will go mostly unheeded. This is, of course, why many of the coveted millennial investors have already rejected much of the Wall Street rhetoric after watching the devastation that wrecked their parents over the last 15 years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Shorting The Yuan Dangeorus?





The announcement that China will start targeting the yuan against a basket of currencies and not the dollar is consistent with the strategy of undermining the dollar's value. While the view of a looming Yuan devaluation seems almost universal, GoldMoney's Alasdair Macleod warns instead that something else may be a foot - China will sell her dollars not to protect the yuan, but to dispose of an overvalued currency.

 
EconMatters's picture

Technical Analysis of the Corn Market





For example, the world population continues to grow, good farming land with proper soil management is a finite resource, and the world is going to need more food in the future.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why 'The Regime' Hates Gold





There’s only one investment we can think of that many people either love or hate reflexively, almost without regard to market performance: gold. And, to a lesser degree, silver. It’s strange that these two metals provoke such powerful psychological reactions - especially among people who dislike them. Nobody has an instinctive hatred of iron, copper, aluminum, or cobalt. The reason, of course, is that the main use of gold has always been as money. And people have strong feelings about money. From an economic viewpoint, however, money is just a medium of exchange and a store of value. Efforts to turn it into a political football invariably are signs of a hidden agenda, or perhaps a psychological aberration. So, let’s take some recent statements, assertions, and opinions that have been promulgated in the media and analyze them.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

3 Things: Expected Returns, Returns, & Net Returns





There is no doubt that another major market reversion is coming. The only question is the timing of such an event which will wipe out the majority of the gains accrued during the first half of the current full market cycle. Assuming that you agree with that statement, here is the question: "If you were offered cash for your portfolio today, would you sell it?" This is the "dilemma" that all investors face today.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Weekend Reading: Differing Diatribes





Importantly, while the "bias" of the market is to the upside, primarily due to the psychological momentum that "stocks are the only game in town," the mounting risks are clearly evident. From economic to earnings-related weakness, the "bullish underpinnings" are slowly being chipped away.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

4 Warnings And Why You Should Pay Attention





No professional or successful investor every bought and held for the long-term without regard, or respect, for the risks that are undertaken. If the professionals are looking at "risk" and planning on how to protect their capital from losses when things go wrong - then why aren't you?  Exactly how many warnings do you need?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"It Looks To Me Like A Bubble Again", Shiller Warns On US Stocks





"It looks to me a bit like a bubble again with essentially a tripling of stock prices since 2009 in just six years and at the same time people losing confidence in the valuation of the market."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The End Of The Fed's "Interest Rate Magic Show" Looms





Over the last five years, we have developed an unhealthy obsession with the Federal Reserve, in particular, and central banks, in general, and there is plenty of blame to go around. Investors have abdicated their responsibilities for assessing growth, cash flows and value, and taken to watching the Fed and wondering what it is going to do next, as if that were the primary driver of stock prices. The Fed has happily accepted the role of market puppet master, with Federal Bank governors seeking celebrity status, and piping up about inflation, the level of stock prices and interest rate policy. We don't know what will happen at the FOMC meeting, but we hope that it announces an end to it's "interest rate magic show."

 
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