Mean Reversion

Past Is Prologue: New Secular Bull Or A Repeat Of The 70s

Despite much hope that the current breakout of the markets is the beginning of a new secular “bull” market – the economic and fundamental variables suggest otherwise. Valuations and sentiment are at very elevated levels which are the opposite of what has been seen previously. Interest rates, inflation, wages and savings rates are all at historically low levels which are normally seen at the end of secular bull market periods, not the beginning of one.

How To Avoid Being A Retail Bag Holder

One chart shows exactly why weekly price performance matters. This is what happened to anyone who only bought after the market was up for the week.

JPM Explains How HFTs Caused Friday's Sterling Flash Crash

"The advent of non-bank liquidity providers such as HFTs has reduced bid ask spread and increased market efficiency in FX markets, but at the cost of lower market depth and withdrawal of liquidity provision in periods of stress."

BofA Stunned By Record VIX Roundtrip; Fears "Fragile Market"

In recent months, BofA notes that the speed of mean reversion in the VIX has been particularly striking by historical standards. Since the end of QE3, VIX spikes have had very little persistence, generating low cumulative volatility relative to the previous 25 years, underscoring BofA's thesis of a fragile market that features rapid jumps from states of calm to states of stress and back.

The QE Premium

" be blunt, given the aforementioned fundamental risks and the poor risk/return skew, history is clearly not in favor of those who remain long equities banking on the Fed to continue to levitate valuations and prices with limited tools and faulty narratives."

Deutsche Warns Of 10% Decline as Market Reaches "Mania" Level

Realized volatility in the US equity markets has been extremely low, and much discussed, but, as Deutsche Bank's David Bianco warns this is "the quiet before the storm." There are five catalysts for increased vol through Autumn but most worrying is the "High P/E, Low VIX" scenario is very risky having reached "mania" levels.

Goldman: The Last Two Times P/E Multiples Expanded This Much, The Result Was A Historic Crash

"The current P/E expansion cycle is now one of the largest in history. Since September 2011, S&P 500 forward P/E has grown by 75% (from 10x to 18x). This expansion has only been surpassed twice since 1976, when the multiple rose by 111% from 1984-1987 (ending with the 22% Black Monday collapse) and by 115% from 1994-1999 (ending with the Tech Bubble pop)." - Goldman Sachs

Investors Plow Record Cash Into Emerging Markets, As Europe Suffers Record Outflows

Whether it is due to the recent speculation that Japan may usher in helicopter money, or ongoing concerns about what Brexit may do to the future of European asset returns, there has been a dramatic shift in fund allocation and as Bank of America reports, investors are rushing to vote with their wallets. They have done so in the latest week by continuing to plow money into EM stocks, allocating a record amount of cash to Emerging Markets, while yanking a similarly record amount of cash from Europe.

Mattress Money & Need-For-Yield: "We Saw This In 2007"

“Cash On The Sidelines.” is the age old excuse why the current “bull market” rally is set to continue into the indefinite future. The ongoing belief is that at any moment investors are suddenly going to empty bank accounts and pour it into the markets. However, the reality is if they haven’t done it by now after 3-consecutive rounds of Q.E. in the U.S., a 200% advance in the markets, and now global Q.E., exactly what will that catalyst be? However, Clifford Asness summed up the problem with this myth the best and is worth repeating...

"This Is The Capitulation Phase" - Why Treasury Yields Are About To Really Plunge

For the rates market, the significance of this acceptance phase by pensions cannot be understated, in our opinion. A $3 trillion industry running a $500 billion funding gap and a significant duration gap waking up to reality is likely to have major implications for the market. In the extreme case, entire pensions could be offloaded from corporate balance sheets to insurance companies (increasingly like the UK, Exhibit 1)–generating significant demand for long-end duration during such transactions.