Meltdown

Tyler Durden's picture

How Likely Is Hyperinflation In The U.S?





Hyperinflation in the U.S. is coming sometime in the next 20 years or so, and this isn't a cry from a Chicken Little, but a conclusion that the analysis strongly suggests. It is possible hyperinflation could happen during the next few years, but that seems unlikely since it would require a series of major crises and political blunders – events unprecedented in the history of the United States. If this led to a corruption of Constitutional rights in the midst of an exaltation of the Executive Branch that resulted in loss of the rule of law, hyperinflation might result. It is much more probable that hyperinflation will be preceded by a long slow decline that will include a protracted period of high inflation, and that the crash of the dollar and hyperinflation will be the final tumble off a looming, steep cliff.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Icahn Vs. Fink: Wall Street Legends Clash Over "Dangerous" ETFs





On Wednesday, Carl Icahn and Larry Fink engaged in an epic debate about the role ETFs play in perpetuating systemic risk. Icahn, taking a page from the Tyler Durden playbook, talks phantom liquidity before calling BlackRock "a dangerous company", and opining that Fink and Janet Yellen are "pushing the damn thing off a cliff."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Greece And The Worst Possible Way To Correct Trade/Productivity Imbalances





Piling on more debt is the worst possible way to correct structural trade and productivity imbalances, yet that is the Eurozone's "solution" to Greece's debt/ trade/ productivity/ corruption crisis.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Exclusive: The Inside Story Of How Deutsche Bank "Deals With" Whistleblowers





On November 7, 2011 Dr. Eric Ben-Artzi walked into a conference room at Deutsche Bank’s U.S. headquarters in lower Manhattan. Seated at a conference table was Sharon Wilson from the Human Resources department. Lars Popken, DB’s head of market risk methodology and Ben-Artzi’s manager, was videoconferenced in. Ben-Artzi’s job, Popken said, was being moved to Germany. Ben-Artzi thought back to the summer when, in response to rumors that some U.S. positions were likely to be moved overseas, he had mentioned he’d be happy to relocate to Berlin. No such luck. Minutes later, he was terminated and Wilson hurriedly ushered him out of the building. Ben-Artzi wasn’t even allowed to collect his personal belongings.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Small Business Optimism Crashes To 15 Month Lows





With all hopes and dreams of economic renaissance in America pinned on small businesses (see ADP's recent gains), today's data from the NFIB will strike fear in the heart of the wealth-effect-creating Fed. The NFIB small business optimism index disappointed expectations in June (94.1 vs. consensus 98.5), falling to its lowest level since March 2014 - the biggest drop since 2012. All components were weaker but most notably hiring and plans to raise worker compensation tumbled. Furthermore, Deloitte's Q2 latest survery shows American CFOs are more worried than at any time since 2013.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Are Central Bankers Poised To Break The World Again?





In his Pulitzer-Prize-winning book, Lords of Finance, the economist Liaquat Ahamad tells the story of how four central bankers, driven by staunch adherence to the gold standard, “broke the world” and triggered the Great Depression. Today’s central bankers largely share a new conventional wisdom – about the benefits of loose monetary policy. Are monetary policymakers poised to break the world again?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

To Mexico And "Beyond": Flash Boys Get Warm Welcome In Emerging Markets





"Exchanges around the world are avidly wooing high-frequency traders, those controversial speed demons of Wall Street. Despite the often explosive debate over this kind of trading in the U.S., bourses in Mexico, Turkey, South Africa and beyond are trying to lure HFT types to boost business," Bloomberg reports.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"There Is Going To Be A Taper Tantrum In Latin America... It Is Inescapable"





Greece needs a bailout and China's stock market is in meltdown mode. But the global economy has another rising red flag: Latin America.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The FDIC's Plan to Raid Bank Accounts During the Next Crisis





Perhaps the most concerning is the fact that should a “systemically important” financial entity go bust, any deposits above $250,000 located therein could be converted to equity… at which point if the company’s shares, your wealth evaporates.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Collective Sigh of Relief may Weigh on the Greenback





Non-bombastic look at the price action and speculative positioning, with the hope of anticipating next week's developments.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Financial Attack On Greece: Where Do We Go From Here?





Every nation has a right to defend itself against attack – financial attack just as overt military attack. That is an essential element in the principle of self-determination. Greece, Spain, Portugal, Italy and other debtor countries have been under the same mode of attack that was waged by the IMF and its austerity doctrine that bankrupted Latin America from the 1970s onward. International law needs to be updated to recognize that finance has become the modern-day mode of warfare. Its objectives are the same: acquisition of land, raw materials and monopolies. A byproduct of this warfare has been to make today’s financial network so dysfunctional that nations need a financial Clean Slate.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

China's Market Isn't Fixed And Why The Global Bubble Will Keep Imploding





The Chinese economy is in an obvious deepening swoon and the median company on the Shanghai exchange had a PE ratio of 60X before the recent break. But no matter. Not only does everything financial race the skyscrapers to the sky in the land of red capitalism, but valuation upside is apparently whatever the comrades in Beijing want it to be. Says Goldman’s chief stock tout for China,“It’s not in a bubble yet.”. Why? Because “China’s government has a lot of tools to support the market.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Oil Price Plunge Reignites Fears for Indebted Shale Companies





“The energy sector of the high-yield market continues to be a silo of misery... If we stay near these levels, marginal high-cost producers won’t be able to survive.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 10





  • Fed Chair Yellen To Speak As Global Tensions Rise (WSJ)
  • Greek PM Tsipras seeks party backing after abrupt concessions (Reuters)
  • France Hails Greek Aid Proposals as Germany Reserves Judgment (BBG)
  • Greek PM says does not have mandate to exit eurozone (Reuters)
  • France Intercedes on Greece’s Behalf to Try to Hold Eurozone Together (WSJ)
  • Frozen Funds, Fleeing Tourists: Greek Startups Feel the Pinch (BBG)
  • Doubts Simmer Despite China’s Gain (WSJ)
 
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