• StalingradandPoorski
    03/04/2015 - 16:46
    What people and central bankers do not understand, is that you can't devalue your way to prosperity. Absolutely nothing has changed since the last crisis. The same too big too fail banks have only...

Mexico

Tyler Durden's picture

Preview Of The Boring Week Ahead





The upcoming week comes less loaded with policy events. The only major one is the Eurogroup meeting on Monday, however EU officials have already confirmed that no decision on the next Greek aid tranche will be made before the Troika’s next report on Greece’s adherence to the bailout conditions. Greece has scheduled an auction for Tuesday in order to roll over €3.1 bn in T-bills expiring by the end of the week. Additionally, in the US, the President has invited leadership of both parties for a first round of talks on the fiscal cliff. The data calendars also look lighter, with the publication of the FOMC minutes on Wednesday, and US Philly Fed on Thursday.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Do We Have What It Takes To Get From Here To There? Part 2: China





Does China have what it takes to get from here (industrialized export economy) to there (sustainable growth, widespread prosperity)? The same can be asked of every nation: do they have what it takes to move beyond their current limitations to the next level? Consider corruption. Corruption isn't just a "values" issue: corrupt societies have corrupt economies, and these economies are severely limited by that corruption. A deeply, pervasively corrupt economy cannot get from here to there. Corruption acts as a "tax" on the economy, siphoning money from the productive to the parasitic unproductive Elites skimming the bribes, payoffs, protection money, unofficial "fees," etc. By definition, the money skimmed by corruption reduces the disposable income of households and enterprises, reducing their consumption and investment... Pull aside the curtain and what you find is a China crippled by corruption and debt.

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana: Your Move Eric Holder





There was one election outcome yesterday that few noticed, judging by mainstream media. We are referring to Colorado’s Amendment 64, which regulates marijuana in a similar manner to alcohol.  It is basically full legalization of pot for adults over 21. It’s interesting that the two states to legalize marijuana both voted for Obama in this election.  Will he now betray all these faithful voters?  Based on his first term performance, you can count on it.  Your move Mr. Holder.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 5





  • Obama and Romney Deadlocked, Polls Show (WSJ)
  • NYC Commuter Week Faces Uncharted Ground as Storm Brews (Bloomberg)
  • New York region struggles to move on a week after Sandy (Reuters)
  • Europe's Bank Reviews Collateral (WSJ)
  • Less circuses to pay for the bread? Time Warner Cable misses on falling demand (Reuters)
  • Spanish unemployment total jumps by 128,242 as recession continues to take its toll on economy (Independent)
  • Goldman Sachs Partner List Drops 31 Since February, Filing Shows (Bloomberg)
  • China's mission impossible - a date for Hu's military handover (Reuters)
  • German-Iranian trade booming (Jerusalem Post)
  • Russia supplying arms to Syria under old contracts: Lavrov (Reuters)
  • Russia endorses Egyptian-led regional group on Syria (Reuters)
  • Election Winner Must Win Over Wall Street (Bloomberg)
  • On Google, a Political Mystery That's All Numbers (WSJ)
  • Richard Koo: explain to Americans why $22 trillion in debt in 4 years is good for them.. or something (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Complete European Sovereign Event Calendar Until 2013





The following is a list of key events (and commentary) to watch over the next two months. From Germany's voting phases for Greek aid to various national strikes and regional elections, there's plenty here of critical importance to the future of the sovereign debt crisis.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

More Greeks Live In Poverty Than Iranians





The number of people in Greece classified as living below the poverty line reached 2.34 million (or over 20% of their 11.3 million population). Ekathimerini reports that the Hellenic Statistical Authority (ELSTAT) has released data from 2010, the first update of this frightful data series post austerity measures. Household spending has dropped dramatically in the two years since then suggesting the current picture is considerably worse. Still, comparing apples to slightly smaller apples, CIA data shows Greece now considerably more impoverished than Iran, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mexico, and the West Bank. The EUR6,591 per annum poverty line in Greece compares to average per capita income of EUR12,637 but what is perhaps most worrisome - as social unrest continues to rise - is that Greece is among the European countries with the greatest financial inequalities, as the richest 20% of the population had an annual income that was six times that of the poorest 20%.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 1





As we enter the North American session, equity markets are seen marginally higher, as concerns over the never-ending Greek debt drama are offset by the release of an encouraging data from China. Chinese HSBC Manufacturing PMI printed a fresh 8-month high, while the official Chinese Manufacturing PMI came in line with expectations. In addition to that, a state researcher has said that the countries economy has bottomed and is stabilizing. Meanwhile in Greece, the fact that debt is now seen climbing to 192% in 2014 and an agreement on how to defuse the situation has yet to be found may lead to another speculative attack not only on Greek paper, but also other southern states. As a result, GR/GE 10s spread is seen wider by 30bps, however other peripheral bond yield spreads with respect to the German Bund are tighter. The second half of the session sees the release of the latest weekly jobs report, consumer confidence and the weekly DoE from the US.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Sentiment: Defending 1400, Again





It was a week ago when we first observed that the defense of 1400 in the ES at all costs must go on, or else the only thing that is keeping the market propped up - psychology (now with the AAPL euphoria long gone), would be gone as would all support. But once again, the overnight session has proven that, with a little help from its central banking friends, 1400 (and 1.2900 in the EURUSD) can be defended. This was in danger of being breached until China reported two PMI numbers: an official one which printed at 50.2, or modest expansion, and up from 49.8, magically right on top of expectations of 50.2, and the HSBC PMI, which also rose to 49.5, from 47.9: the 12th straight contraction print, but the highest number in 8 months. The market spin is naturally that this is an indication of a rebounding China. Sadly, just like in the US, this is merely pre-party congress data manipulation. The only thing that does matter out of China: whether or not the country will actually ease as opposed to doing day to day reverse repo injections. Without the former, the Chinese economy will not rebound, and will not lead to an improvement in corporate outlook for US tech stocks, period, the end.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Only Global Banks Will Benefit From A Cyber-Attack On The U.S.





A cyber attack does not have to be limited to a single country and its networks.  It could be used to strike multiple countries and fuel a global firestorm of systems failures.  Globalists need a macro-crisis, a world-wide catastrophe, in order to present their “global solution” to the desperate masses. This solution will invariably include more dominance for them, and less freedom for us.  A global crisis can also be used to manipulate various cultures to forget concerns of sovereignty and think in terms of one-world action.  Surely, a worldwide breakdown can only be solved if we “all work together and all think alike”, right...? Without a doubt, a cyber attack serves the interests of elitist entities and banking monstrosities like nothing else in existence.  Set off a nuke, start WWIII, turn the U.S. dollar into stagflationary dust; a cyber attack tops them all, because a cyber attack can lead to them all while maintaining deniability for the establishment.  The fact that whispers of cyber threats have turned into bullhorn blasted propaganda should concern us all.  Are we being conditioned for a cyber event in the near future?  That remains to be seen.  However, none of us should be surprised if one does occur, especially in light of the many gains involved for globalists, and all of us should be ready to dismantle and expose any lies surrounding the event before the American public is whipped into a 9/11 style frenzy yet again

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 26





  • Greece Faces Need for Additional Assistance: €30 billion (WSJ)
  • Greeks fail to agree on bailout terms (FT)
  • The report that got the NYT banned on the Chinese interweb: Billions in Hidden Riches for Family of Chinese Leader (NYT)
  • Bo Xilai: China parliament expels disgraced politician (BBC)
  • Japan Adds Stimulus Amid Threat of Bond-Sale Disruption... $9.4 billion (Bloomberg)
  • Hubbard Said to Prefer Treasury Chief to Fed If Romney Wins (Bloomberg)
  • 9 More Banks Subpoenaed Over Libor (WSJ)
  • Romney raises $112m in 17 days (FT)
  • Amid Cutbacks, Greek Doctors Offer Message to Poor: You Are Not Alone (NYT)... no, we are all broke
  • Muni Downgrades Top 2011 Total on Weak Economy: Moody’s (Bloomberg)
  • Ireland urges ECB to commit to bond-buying (FT)
  • Cameron and Clegg unite in EU demands (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Presidential Election Preview 3: Swing States And The Horserace





The 2012-2013 election season is exceptional, with more than 100 elections in economies accounting for approximately 60% of global GDP. So far, Goldman notes that markets have navigated through elections in Russia, Egypt, Greece, France, Mexico and Venezuela, among others. The closely watched Presidential election in the US will take place shortly, followed by the culmination of the political transition in China. Later on, markets will see countries like Italy, Iran, and Japan go to the ballots too. This extraordinary election season brings several questions to the forefront: Why are elections important market events? What are the main factors affecting that market-driving impact and its seasonality? And which states are key? Critically, Goldman finds that a divided government has on average produced considerably tighter fiscal policy - not a good sign for the Keynesians.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 23





  • Moody’s Cuts Ratings on Catalonia, Four Other Spanish Regions (Bloomberg)
  • And the market top: Billionaire Ross Interested in Buying Spanish Bank Assets (Bloomberg)
  • Japan Jojima denies govt seeks $250 bln BOJ asset buying boost (Reuters)
  • China hints at move to strengthen Communist rule (Reuters)... well everyone else is doing it
  • Euro-Area Bailout Fund Faces Challenge at EU’s Highest Court (Bloomberg)
  • Obama, Romney now tied in presidential race: Reuters/Ipsos poll (Reuters)
  • Former China Leader Jiang Resurfaces Before Political Transition (Bloomberg)
  • Some in Congress look to $55 billion fiscal cliff 'fallback' (Reuters)
  • CLOs stage comeback in US (FT)
  • TXU Teeters as Firms Reap $528 Million Fees (Bloomberg)
  • China’s Factories Losing Pricing Power in Earnings Threat (Bloomberg)
 
Bruce Krasting's picture

How I Caused the 1987 Crash





From 1987: How much time do I have to liquidate?    Answer:  We need you to do this by Monday night.

 
Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!