Michigan

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: March 15





  • JPMorgan Report Piles Pressure on Dimon in Too-Big Debate (BBG)
  • Employers Blast Fees From New Health Law (WSJ)
  • Obama unveils US energy blueprint (FT)
  • Obama to Push Advanced-Vehicle Research (WSJ) - here come Solar-powered cars?
  • BRICs Abandoned by Locals as Fund Outflows Reach 1996 High (BBG)
  • Obama won't trip over Netanyahu's Iran "red line" (Reuters)
  • Samsung puts firepower behind Galaxy (FT)
  • Boeing sees 787 airborne in weeks with fortified battery (Reuters)
  • Greece Counts on Gas, Gambling to Revive Asset Sales Tied to Aid (BBG)
  • Goldman’s O’Neill Says S&P 500 Beyond 1,600 Needs Growth (BBG)
  • China’s new president in corruption battle (FT)
  • Post-Chavez Venezuela as Chilly for Companies From P&G to Coke (BBG)
 
Marc To Market's picture

Respect the Price Action, Better Opportunity Next Week to Resist





The reversal begun yesterday in the FX market is continuing today. Although we are skeptical of the factors being cited as causes of the price action, we suggest it should be respected and will look for opportunities next week to get back with what we suspect is the underlying trend.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Today's Pre-Ramp Preview





"Equity prices in the US and Europe have been hovering at multi-year highs. To the extent that this reflects powerful policy easing, equity markets may have lost some of its ability to reflect economic trends in exchange for an important role in the policy fight to support spending." This is a statement from a Bank of America report overnight in which the bailed out bank confirms what has been said here since the launch of QE1 - there is no "market", there is no economic growth discounting mechanism, there is merely a monetary policy vehicle. To those, therefore, who can "forecast" what this vehicle does based on the whims of a few good central planners, we congratulate them. Because, explicitly, there is no actual forecasting involved. The only question is how long does the "career trade", in which everyone must be herded into the same trades or else risk loss of a bonus or job, go on for before mean reversion finally strikes. One thing that is clear is that since news is market positive, irrelevant of whether it is good or bad, virtually everything that has happened overnight, or will happen today, does not matter, and all stock watchers have to look forward to is another low volume grind higher, as has been the case for the past two weeks.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Initial Claims Lower Than Expected At 332K, PPI In Line With Expectations





The grind lower in initial jobless claims continues, which from an upwardly revised 342k (was 340K) last week, declined to 332K in the most recent week ended March 9, on expectations of an increase to 350K. This was the third consecutive beat in a row and the lowest total print since January, which in turn takes it all the way back to January 2008. Continuing claims were also better than expected, dropping from an upwardly-revised 3113K, to 3024K, on expectations of a 3090K print. According to the BLS, unlike the last time we had an abnormally low print, no states were estimated this time around.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: What Happened To The Uproar Over Energy Speculators?





Gasoline prices in the U.S. Midwest have pulled back from the seasonal highs reported in February. Motor group AAA reported Monday that U.S. commuters paid, on average, $3.69 for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline, just over 1 percent less than they paid last week. For some markets, that's the first time gasoline prices have declined this year. A series of refinery issues, coupled with higher oil prices, left some motorists in February paying the highest they've ever paid seasonally for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline. By the end of February, some drivers in the Midwest were paying nearly $4 per gallon on average, sparking congressional debate over the impact of speculation in the energy market. Given concerns over costs associated with healthcare, insurance and other issues not related directly to energy, it's curious why there aren't hearings when prices begin to fall.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: NFIB: "No Sign Of A Surge In Confidence"





The latest release of the National Federation of Independent Business Small Business Survey was a bit of dichotomy of interpretation. Is the inventory increase really a sign of optimism or is it an unwanted buildup as sales have slowed as shown by the latest wholsesale inventory report?  Are capital outlays really a sign of optimism or is it simply just required maintenance and upkeep?  The interpretation of the data is key to understanding the direction of the overall economy. Economic confidence still remains at levels lower than in 2011 or in 2008 during the depths of the financial crisis. Concerns for businesses remain weighted toward the consumer and the government.  Weak sales, government regulations and taxes are the top 3 biggest headwinds curtailing small business currently.  With the upcoming debates over the debt ceiling and the budget it is unlikely that these concerns are going to improve much anytime soon.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: March 12





  • Cardinals head to conclave to elect pope for troubled Church (Reuters)
  • Hyperinflation 'Unthinkable' Even With Bold Easing: Abe (Nikkei)
  • Ryan Plan Revives '12 Election Issues (WSJ)
  • Italy 1-yr debt costs highest since Dec after downgrade (Reuters)
  • Republicans to unveil $4.6tn of cuts (FT) - Obama set to dismiss Ryan plan to balance budget within decade
  • CIA Ramps Up Role in Iraq (WSJ)
  • Hollande Hostility Fuels Charm Offensive to Show He’s No Sarkozy (BBG)
  • SEC testing customized punishments (Reuters)
  • Judge Cans Soda Ban  (WSJ)
  • Hungary Lawmakers Rebuff EU, U.S. (WSJ)
  • Even Berlusconi Can’t Slow Bulls Boosting Euro View (BBG) - luckily the consensus is never wrong
  • Funding for Lending ‘put on steroids’ (FT)
  • Investigators Narrow Focus in Dreamliner Probe (WSJ)
  • With new group, Obama team seeks answer to Karl Rove (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Macro Events And Issues In The Week Ahead





In the upcoming week the key focus on the data side will be the US February retail sales figures on Wednesday, which should provide clearer evidence on how the tax increases that took place on January 1 have affected the consumer. In Europe, industrial production and inflation data will be the releases to watch. On the policy side, the focus will be on the BoJ appointments in an otherwise relatively quiet week for G7 central banks. Italy’s newly elected lawmakers convene for the first time on Friday 15 March and the expectation remains that President Napolitano will formally invite Mr Bersani to try and form a new government. He may also opt for a technocrat government. Although clearly preferred by markets, winning political backing may prove challenging.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

12 Things That Just Happened That Show The Next Wave Of The Economic Collapse Is Almost Here





Are we running out of time?  For the last several years, we have been living in a false bubble of hope that has been fueled by massive amounts of debt and bailout money.  This illusion of economic stability has convinced most people that the great economic crisis of 2008 was just an "aberration" and that now things are back to normal.  Unfortunately, that is not the case at all.  The truth is that the financial crash of 2008 was just the first wave of our economic troubles.  We have not even come close to recovering from that wave, and the next wave of the economic collapse is rapidly approaching.  Our economy is like a giant sand castle that has been built on a foundation of debt and toilet paper currency.  As each wave of the crisis hits us, the solutions that our leaders will present to us will involve even more debt and even more money printing.  And each time, those "solutions" will only make our problems even worse.  Right now, events are unfolding in Europe and in the United States that are pushing us toward the next major crisis moment.  I sincerely hope that we have some more time before the next crisis overwhelms us, but as you will see, time is rapidly running out. The following are 12 things that just happened that show the next wave of the economic collapse is almost here...

 
testosteronepit's picture

The Great Backpedal: The World Has NOT Come To An End





But the fake deadlines, the even more fake serial fiscal crises, it all came to an end with a whimper

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Detroit To Be Taken Over By The State





Usually, when the administration needs a distraction from just how broke and insolvent in reality the country is, it sends the stock market soaring higher. As such it is beyond ironic that as the S&P is set to hit an all time high, Detroit - that shining symbol of the Obama administration's bailout of General Motors - effectively goes broke.

MICH. GOV SNYDER TO ANNOUNCE STATE TAKEOVER OF DETROIT

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Tim Geithner To Hold Financial Crisis Seminars





When it comes to generating near-apocalyptic financial crises, there are few men quite as qualified as the former NY Fed and US Treasury head Tim Geithner. Which is why it is not at all unexpected that while he is drafting his tell all memoirs, which may or may not include details on why he leaked confidential market moving Fed information to Wall Street's banks, the TurboTax expert is set to take the university circuit by storm and teach young and impressionable minds about how not to do anything he did. As WSJ reports, "Former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner plans to hit the university circuit in the coming months, conducting a series of seminars on financial crises. Mr. Geithner, who left the Obama administration last month after four eventful years at Treasury, should have unique insights on such crises. He was president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and then Treasury secretary during the 2008-2009 financial meltdown. Mr. Geithner has committed to seminars at Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northwestern University, Princeton University and the University of Michigan." Surely, the future central planners of the world are already shaking with anticipation.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Macro Events In The Coming Week





Next week’s calendar is packed with important events and releases, aside of course from the biggest event of the week which are the Italian elections. In fact we already got the first one in the form of China's disappointing HSBC flash PMI which consensus expectations would print stable yet which dropped to a 4 month low. On Friday, the ISM is expected to come out mildly softer vs last month’s strong 53.1 print and consensus at 52.5. Chicago PMI will also be followed by markets on Thursday. On the central bank front markets will be primarily looking for further news on the BOJ leadership succession front. From the perspective of Fed speakers, Chairman Bernanke’s testimony ahead of the Senate Banking Committee will also be followed as markets continue to track the Fed’s assessment of the economic recovery. In the global currency warfare front, the Bank of Israel is expected to cut policy rates by 25bps on Monday, as well as the National Bank of Hungary on Tuesday.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Weekly Bull/Bear Recap: Feb. 11-15, 2013 (And G-20 Preview)





This objective report concisely summarizes important macro events over the past week.  It is not geared to push an agenda.  Impartiality is necessary to avoid costly psychological traps, which all investors are prone to, such as confirmation, conservatism, and endowment biases. Also - from Citi's Steven Englander - what to worry about from this weekend's G-20 extravaganza...

 
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