• BullionStar
    05/30/2016 - 21:24
    The US Gold Market is best known as the home of gold futures trading on the COMEX in New York. The COMEX has a literal monopoly on gold futures trading volumes worldwide, but very little physical...

Monetary Base

Tyler Durden's picture

Why The Fed Can't Stop The Next Market Crash





The Fed was late to prevent the popping of the last two bubbles, and it’s already too late to stop the popping of this one.  The Fed is consistently behind on the timing of when to reintroduce stimulus because its only choice to deal with the bubble it’s created is let it crash, or blow it up even bigger which would result in an even harder landing.  While the Fed ponders when the rate hike comes, our question is: When does QE4 start?
 
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Shorting The Federal Reserve





Holding gold is simply recognition that the Fed’s actions over the last 30 years have potentially severe consequences that pose threats to the value of most financial assets, the almighty dollar and ultimately your clients’ purchasing power. Owning gold is in effect not only a short on the dollar and on the credibility of the Federal Reserve, but most importantly a one of a kind asset that protects wealth.

 
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Welcome To The Newer Normal: Your Complete Guide To A World In Which The Fed Is No Longer In Control





For those who have had the nagging feeling that something in the market has changed dramatically in the past few months, you are absolutely correct. Here is the full explanation.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

US Equity Futures Hit Overnight Highs On Renewed Hope Of More BOJ QE





After sliding early in Sunday pre-market trade, overnight US equity futures managed to rebound on the now traditional low-volume levitation from a low of 1938 to just over 1950 at last check, ignoring the biggest single-name blowup story this morning which is the 23% collapse in Volkswagen shares, and instead have piggybacked on what we said was the last Hail Mary for the market: the hope of more QE from either the ECB or the BOJ. Tonight, it was the latter and while Japan's market are closed until Thursday for public holidays, its currency which is the world's preferred carry trade and the primary driver alongside VIX manipulation of the S&P500, has jumped from a low of just over 119 on Friday morning to a high of 120.4, pushing the entire US stock market with it.

 
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Austrian Economics, Monetary Freedom, & America's Economic Roller-Coaster





It is time for a radical denationalization of money, a privatization of the monetary and banking system through a separation of government from money and all forms of financial intermediation. That is the pathway to ending the cycles of booms and busts, and creating the market-based institutional framework for sustainable economic growth and betterment. It is time for monetary freedom to replace the out-of-date belief in government monetary central planning.

 
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Weekend Reading: Fed Rate Failure





The current surge in deflationary pressures is not just due to the recent fall in oil prices, but rather a global epidemic of slowing economic growth. While Janet Yellen addressed this "disinflationary" wave during her post-meeting press conference, the Fed still maintains the illusion of confidence that economic growth will return shortly. Unfortunately, this has been the Fed's "Unicorn" since 2011 as annual hopes of economic recovery have failed to materialize.

 
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China Stocks Drop Most Since Late August, BOJ Disappoints Bailout Addicts; US Futures Flat





Almost two weeks after we explained why any hope for a QQE boost by the BOJ is a myth, and that any increase in monetization will simply lead to a faster tapering and ultimately halt of Kuroda's bond purchases the market finally grasped this, when overnight the BOJ not only did not easy further as some - certainly the USDJPY - had expected, but kept its QE at the JPY80 trillion level and failed to offer any hints of further easing that many had hoped for, pushing the Nikkei down from up almost 400 point intraday to virtually unchanged and sending the USDJPY back under 120. JGBs also traded lower on concerns there may not be much more QE to frontrun.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

USDJPY, Nikkei 225 Tumbles After Disappointing "No Change" From Bank Of Japan





We noted earlier the premature exuberation in USDJPY and Nikkei 225 - despite most of the sell-side not expecting anything from The BoJ - and it appears the banks were right and the FOMO traders wrong. The Bank of Japan made no change to its monetary policy (no increased buying, no shift in ETF allocations, and no NIRP for now). BoJ members spewed forth their usual mix of "everything is awesome" and "any quarter now" for the recovery but the market wasn't buying it. That leaves only one thing left to cling to for a "we must buy" crowd - no change today 'guarantees' moar QQE in October.

 
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"Ineffective & Reckless" Fed Is An "Engine of Disaster"





In short, activist Fed policy is both ineffective and reckless (and the historical data bears this out), and that the Federal Reserve has pushed the financial markets to a precipice from which no gentle retreat is ultimately likely. Similar precipices, such as 1929 and 2000, and even lesser precipices like 1906, 1937, 1973 and 2007 have always had unfortunate endings. A quarter-point hike will not cause anything. The causes are already baked in the cake. A rate hike may be a trigger with respect to timing, but that’s all. History suggests we should place our attention on valuations and market internals in any event.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Enough Already! Raise The Rate To 3 Percent





Everything is so wonderful that a rate hike would equate to saying the Fed has won. Seven years of ZIRP and a few selling periods when the Fed stopped POMO’s and QE injections, we can easily say with extreme confidence that the Fed won. And by won we mean didn’t ruin the system entirely. Except they did.

 
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10 Things Every Economist Should Know About The Gold Standard





At the risk of sounding like a broken record we'd like to say a bit more about economists' tendency to get their monetary history wrong; in particular, the common myths about the gold standard. If there's one monetary history topic that tends to get handled especially sloppily by monetary economists, not to mention other sorts, this is it. Sure, the gold standard was hardly perfect, and gold bugs themselves sometimes make silly claims about their favorite former monetary standard. But these things don't excuse the errors many economists commit in their eagerness to find fault with that "barbarous relic." The point, in other words, isn't to make a pitch for gold.  It's to make a pitch for something - anything - that's better than our present, lousy money.

 
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