Monetary Policy

Most "Priced In" Policy Since 2011 - Why Draghi Better Not Disappoint

Mario Draghi better put up or shut up at the next ECB meeting as the market is more-than-pricing-in a very significant deposit rate cut (deeper into NIRP). In fact, at -56bps, 2Y German bond yields are the most "priced in" since 2011 (and bear in mind he disappointed in December).

Gold Retests $1250 After Dismal Global Data Dump

From decoupled American to deteriorating China, PMIs (and plenty of other data) is rapidly descending into the ugly reality that every mainstream economist is in denial about. Of course, this terrible news is terrific news for stocks (moar stimulus) but it is Gold that appears to be benefitting most as the inevitability of the next extreme monetary policy makeover looms ever closer...

Stocks Squeeze Higher On "Super Tuesday" As Poor Macro Is Offset By Jack Lew's Soothing Words

With markets happy to put February in the history books because it marked the fourth consecutive monthly decline in global stocks, we move on to March 1st, which doubles down as 'Super Tuesday' in the US when Trump's presidential candidacy will almost certainly be sealed and a day in which stocks decided to join the super fun by super surging overnight on nothing but bad global macro and economic which however was promptly ignored and instead the focus was on ongoing central bank intervention and even more jawboning.

The Long History of Government Meddling In The American Marketplace

Attempts to control economic growth through government spending and/or manipulating interest rates (e.g., stimulate growth with low rates) generally leads to more severe crises. None of these things are recent phenomena, but can be found again and again throughout American history. Today, there is no party that favors true privatization or free markets. The solution, however, is simply to take as much power as possible out of the control of corruptible politicians and their special interest supporters.

Aussie Housing Bubble Bursts - Building Approvals Crash Most In 4 Years

Having admitted to entirely 'cooking the books' with its jobs data, it appears Australian authorities are going full kitchen-sink and 'allowing' all the dismally honest data out to the market (we assume in some desperate PR need to justify their next monetary policy experiment). Building Approvals fell 7.5% MoM in January, crashing 15.5% YoY (5 standard deviations below expectations)  - the biggest drop since April 2012 (and the 3rd month in a row of declines).

This Is The Last Stage Before Recession

The probability of recession is increasing. Contrary to popular belief, the beginning of a recession is not deflationary but the exact opposite. We expect a recession by the end of 2016, and if that projection turns out to be wrong due to a massive turnaround in Fed policy, the cataclysmic event will only be postponed till 2017.

Six Reasons To Buy Gold In 2016

“Betting against gold is the same as betting on governments. He who bets on governments and government money bets against 6,000 years of recorded human history.” – Charles De Gaulle

"Has Everyone Lost Their Freaking Minds?"

It’s getting weird and the market is having a tough time figuring out what to take seriously, what to ignore, what to laugh nervously about and what to just laugh at. Are serious economists actually have a debate about whether it is a good idea to just print up cash and pass it out? Is that really monetary policy? Are governments really talking about banning actual currency, the very money created by that government? Money that depends, oh by the way, solely on people’s trust that the government will stand behind the money they are about to outlaw? Has everyone lost their freaking minds?

China's Panicked RRR Cut Leads To Feeble Stock Rebound; Gold Resumes Climb

After the G-20 ended in a wave of global disappointment, leading to the biggest Yuan devaluation in 8 weeks, and sending Chinese stocks into a tailspin on concerns the PBOC has forsaken its stock market as well as speculation the housing bubble is now sucking up excess liquidity which in turn pushed global market deep in the red to start the week, it was the PBOC's turn to scramble in a panicked reaction to sliding risk exactly one month after Japan unveiled its own desperation NIRP, and as reported before unexpectedly cut its Reserve Requirement Ratio by 0.5% to 17.0%, the first such cut in 2016 and the 5th since the start of 2015.

After €670 Billion In QE, European Inflation Plunges To -0.2%: Lowest In One Year

A little under one year after the ECB launched its own QE of €60 Billion/month in bond purchases in early March 2015, a process which has resulted in the ECB monetizing over €670 billion in European - mostly German - sovereign paper, moments ago Eurostat reported European February inflation (even though the month is not over yet), and it was a shock, with headline inflation tumbling form +0.3% Y/Y in January to a depressing -0.2% in February, the worst print since January 2015. It was expected to drop to "only" 0.0%.

China Cuts Reserve Ratio One Day After G20

In the “uninspiring” communique delivered following the G20 in Shanghai, officials pledged to “consult closely” on FX markets. We’re not sure whether there was any “close consulting” between the PBoC and its counterparts around the world on Monday, but China just announced another RRR cut (50 bps), the fifth such move since early last year.

Central Banks Shiny New Tool: Cash-Escape-Inhibitors

Negative interests rates are the shiny new thing that everyone wants to talk about. We hate to ruin a good plot line, but they're actually kind of boring; just conventional monetary policy except in negative rate space. Same old tool, different sign. No, the novel tool that has been created is what we're going to call a cash escape inhibitor.

Forward Guidance: The Road Map To Crazy Town

If one puts aside all of the moving metrics and policy talk that happened during Mr. Bernanke’s tenure. How would one assess “the guidance” or the “communications for clarity” we now have emanating from not only the Fed., but also, central bankers globally? Crazy Town is the only thing that comes to my mind. (Hint: look to the SNB or BoJ for clues)

The G-20 Meeting Was A Big Disappointment: What Happens Next

It is now all up to the ECB: "If they lowball or grudgingly meet expectations, we could face another December 4 move because market participants will see it as the equivalent of a ‘last ease in the cycle announcement’, basically ECB throwing in the towel. If they move aggressively they will catch market off guard and unwind the view that policymakers see themselves as powerless."