Monetary Policy

Frontrunning: February 19

  • Stocks knocked back as oil rally falters (Reuters)
  • Still no deal for Britain on EU reforms after all-night talks (Reuters)
  • Oil Falls Near $30 as Rising U.S. Crude Stockpiles Expand Glut (BBG)
  • PBOC to Raise Reserve Ratios for Banks That Don't Meet Criteria (BBG)
  • China’s Top Securities Regulator to Step Down (WSJ)

Markets Ignore Fundamentals And Chase Headlines Because They Are Dying

No society wants to admit economic failure or economic sabotage, and this is why the con-game is able to continue in the face of so much concrete truth. Ultimately, the market trends and economic trends will flow into the negative. In the meantime, expect massive market rallies, rallies which will then disintegrate in a matter of days. And, whatever happens, never take what mainstream economists say very seriously. They have failed the public for long enough.

When Paper Money Becomes Trash

It costs 1.7 cents to make a penny and 8 cents to make a nickel. The U.S. government loses tens of millions of dollars every year putting these coins into circulation. So, why is it wasting money and time making coins almost no one uses? Because phasing out the penny and nickel would mean acknowledging currency debasement. And governments never like to do that. It would reveal their incompetence and theft from savers.

Forget "The Great Moderation", This Is "The Great Intellectual Failure"

History might look back on this period as a great intellectual failure for not properly understanding the dynamics. The Fed should spend more of its intellectual power trying to understand why its policy actions have not had the desired or expected result. Market pundits arguing for easier money (or negative rates) do not fully understand the long-run unintended consequences to markets and economies from extreme and long periods of unconventional monetary policy. Market turbulence today is a warning sign.

NIRP Won't Work - What Ray Dalio Thinks Central Banks Will Do Next

While negative interest rates will make cash a bit less attractive (but not much), it won’t drive investors/savers to buy the sort of assets that will finance spending. And while QE will push asset prices somewhat higher, investors/savers will still want to save, lenders will still be cautious lenders, and cautious borrowers will remain cautious, so we will still have “pushing on a string.” As a result, Monetary Policy 3 will have to be directed at spenders more than at investors/savers.

The Four Horsemen Of Economic Apocalypse Are Here

"...the economic patient is riddled with cancer - central banks are applying a defibrillator, but there's only so much electricity the patient can take before it becomes a burnt-out corpse."

Biggest Short Squeeze In 7 Years Continues After Bullard Hints At More QE, OECD Cuts Global Forecasts

Just when traders thought that the biggest and most violent 3-day short squeeze in 7 years was about to end a squeeze that has resulted in 3 consecutve 1%+ sessions for the S&P for the first time since October 2011, overnight we got one of the Fed's biggest faux-hakws, St. Louis Fed's Jim Bullard, who said that it would be "unwise" to continue hiking rates at this moment, and hinted that "if needed", the most natural option for the Fed going forward would be to do further Q.E.

"Perma-bears" 2 - BofA Economist 0

"Capital markets seem to be pricing in a 50% or higher probability of a US recession. Our rates team has developed an adjusted yield curve measure that signals a 68% probability of recession."

As "Plan A" Fails, This Is What The Fed's "Plan B" Would Look Like

As you might have noticed, the Fed made a policy mistake in December. We could delve deeply into the specifics, but quite frankly it all boils down to this: Yellen hiked right into a recession. With the pressure mounting, and with Janet Yellen having failed (miserably) to reassure the market with her testimony on Capitol Hill earlier this month, what’s in the cards for the Fed if the situation (both in financial markets and in the real economy) continues to deteriorate?

Morgan Stanley Admits "Our Advice Has Been Horrendous", Blames "Bizarro World"

"Our portfolio advice has been pretty horrendous lately.... As an investor recently said to us at a conference, “I am doing a lot of things, just nothing with confidence”. Doing the opposite of what we recommended would have been better. Bizarro World. Or at least hopefully not the real world.."   - Morgan Stanley's Adam Parket