Monetary Policy

Key Events In The Coming Week

With the key event of the week flying largely under the radar, which as previewed here last week was Bernanke's visit to Japan which has already led to another global market spike, here are the rest of the week's events.

Frontrunning: July 11

  • Global stocks rise as markets anticipate stimulus (Reuters)
  • Global Stocks Buoyed by Rally in Japan (WSJ)
  • Andrea Leadsom Pulls Out of Conservative Party Leadership Race (WSJ)
  • More protesters arrested, police say Dallas sniper plotted bigger assault (Reuters)
  • Voters Add to Election Turmoil by Threatening to Jump Party Lines (WSJ)

S&P 500 To Open At All Time Highs After Japan Soars, Yen Plunges On JPY10 Trillion Stimulus

S&P 500 futures are set to open at new all time highs, with global stocks rallying as the yen weakened and the Nikkei soared on speculation Japan is about to unveil the first instance of "helicopter money"-lite, as well as due to a continuation of better-than-expected U.S. jobs data. Further speculation that Italy's (and Europe's) insolvent banks will be bailed out has further boosted sentiment.

Deutsche Bank's Chief Economist Calls For €150 Billion Bailout Of European Banks

David Folkerts-Landau, the chief economist of Deutsche Bank, has called for a multi-billion dollar bailout for European banks. Speaking to Germany's Welt am Sonntag, the economist said European institutions should get fresh capital for a recapitalization following a similar bailout in the US. What he didn't say is that the US bailout took place nearly a decade ago, in the meantime Europe's financial sector was supposed to be fixed courtesy of "prudent" fiscal and monetary policy. It wasn't.

The Prospects For Money

"In my view, this new bout of turmoil in financial markets is the prelude to the final demise of government currency..."

"I Do Not Like This Uncle Sam..."

With markets and monetary policy already reduced to Seussian fantasy, and the average insta-American incapable of comprehending anything but snapchat-'memes', we thought the following summed up the state of US politics perfectly...

With Over $13 Trillion In Negative-Yielding Debt, This Is The Pain A 1% Spike In Rates Would Inflict

There is now $13 trillion of global negative-yielding debt. And, as the WSJ writes, even a small increase in interest rates could inflict hefty losses on investors. With the 2013 "taper tantrum" the Fed sparked a selloff as it discussed ending its bond-buying program known as quantitative easing. A repeat "would be very painful for a lot of people" said J.P. Morgan. This is just how painful.

Obama Blames "Easy Access To Guns" For Surge In Violence Between Police And Minorities

Obama pledged on Saturday to seek ways to calm racial tensions and reduce divisions between police and minorities during his final months in office, but he warned that easy access to guns nationwide exacerbated the problem. "The proliferation of guns among the U.S. citizenry contributes to lethal encounters between minorities and police, heightening the danger law enforcement officers face in even routine interactions with the public."

The Great Market Tide Has Now Shifted

Risk-on assets (stocks) rising at the same time as safe-haven assets is akin to dogs marrying cats and living happily ever after. What the heck is going on? Why is the market acting so schizophrenic? What’s changed?

When Narratives Go Bad

There’s a … tiredness … to the status quo Narratives, a Marie Antoinette-ish world weariness that sighs and pouts about those darn peasants all the way to the guillotine.

Weekend Reading: Central Banks Save The World

For now, Central Banks have seemingly accomplished the rescue of the entire global financial system by one again lofting asset prices higher. The problem, however, remains the underlying fundamental issues of weak earnings, slowing economic growth and a collapsing Chinese economy. There is a point, unknown to anyone currently, where the failure of monetary policy will occur.