Monetary Policy

Tyler Durden's picture

Muppet Slaying Must Go On: Goldman Closed Out Of Its Short Bunds Reco For 2% Loss

That greatest contrarian indicator in the history of finance, Tom Stolper (arguably even better than Dennis Gartman), may no longer be at Goldman but his muppet-crushing spirit lives on. With Bund (and Treasury) yields tumbling to lows not seen since mid 2013, adding insult to injury, and accelerating the short squeeze, here is Goldman's Francesco Garzarelli with "Trade Update: Close Trade recommendation selling short Euro Bund June 14 futures (RXM4), for a potential loss of 2%."

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Santelli Introduces Subprime 2.0

In his first major speech since The White House got their 'flexible' man in to manage the GSEs, Mel Watt outlined his strategic plan for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Predicated on the maintenance of liquidity, competition, and resilience of the national housing finance market, Watt's remarkably blind to the past proposal will, as CNBC's Rick Santelli warns, create Subprime 2.0. Easing lending standards, not lowering limits, and raising the possibility of principal reduction seems to do anything but reduce taxpayer risk and merely creates more perverse incentives. Santelli steams, as the orthodox monetary policy channel of the last 30 years continues to be pumped ever higher, "immense fiscal and monetary stimulus has gotten us nowhere." As we suspect Rich might have concluded... Watt the fuck!? "if you believe any of this, you have to be crazy after what we've been through."

Tyler Durden's picture

Why Is Goldman Hoping The "Winter" Ends Before July

"by July we expect the US economy to be in full recovery from the weather- and inventory-induced slowdown in Q1, and this should push US rates higher and boost the Dollar, including against the Yen." - Goldman Sachs

Tyler Durden's picture

German Finance Minister Admits To "New Bubbles" & "Excessive Confidence"

Last week the Fed's Janet Yellen warned of a small cap bubble and now German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble says in a speech in Munich today that "monetary policy must reduce its dominant role" to allow a return to "reasonable" interest rates. He did not stop there though...


Don't fight the Fed... or the German finance minister... (though with the DAX and S&P at record highs today, he must be talking about bonds or Russian stocks as the bubble that is excessively confident)

Tyler Durden's picture

EUR Slides To 1.37 On ECB June Action Jawboning, Bundesbank Edition

Just in case the EURUSD didn't price in enough of the possibility of a June ECB rate cut (because with even Goldman saying no, there is zero chance Draghi will engage in QE) disclosed last week when Mario Draghi broke the ECB's cardinal rule and gave a hint at what is coming next month, an hour ago the WSJ, citing a "person familiar" and we would add likely person who also happens to be short the EURUSD, helped double down on the end of forward guidance (since going forward market will expect action from the ECB instead of mere talk) by saying that the Bundesbank "is willing to back an array of stimulus measures from the European Central Bank next month, including a negative rate on bank deposits and purchases of packaged bank loans if needed to keep inflation from staying too low, a person familiar with the matter said."

Tyler Durden's picture

Fed Governor Admits Truth About QE: "Can't Go From Wild Turkey To Cold Turkey Overnight"

“I am often asked why I do not support a more rapid deceleration of our purchases, given my agnosticism about their effectiveness and my concern that they might well be leading to froth in certain segments of the financial markets. The answer is an admission of reality: We juiced the trading and risk markets so extensively that they became somewhat addicted to our accommodation of their needs… you can’t go from Wild Turkey to cold turkey overnight."

- Fed Governor Richard Fisher

GoldCore's picture

Bank Account Raid Powers Needed Or Taxes Will Rise - UK Prime Minister

This is another example of creeping powers that pose a real threat to bank deposits. It will create further jitters about the safety of deposits and heighten the risk of bank runs. These risks highlight the importance of diversifying and having some of your wealth outside the vulnerable banking and financial system.

Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman Says European QE Will Come In 2015 At The Earliest, If At All

  • Goldman’s Andrew Wilson Says QE in Europe a 2015 Story If at All
  • European economy would have to weaken significantly before QE comes into play, said Andrew Wilson, co-head of Global Fixed Income and Liquidy management team at Goldman Sachs Asset Management.
  • Says Draghi has foreshadowed policy easing at next meeting, expects ECB to cut rates 1-2 times before they look to other methods such as an LTRO
  • Says if other methods don’t work it would “ultimately have to be QE”
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events In The Coming Week

This week markets are likely to focus on a few important data prints in DMs, including Philly Fed in the US (expect solid expansionary territory) and 1Q GDP releases in the Euro area (with upside risks). In DMs, the highlights of the week include [on Monday] Japan’s trade balance data and Australia business conditions; [on Tuesday] US retail sales, CPI in Italy and Sweden; [on Wednesday] US PPI, Euro area IP, CPI in France, Germany and Spain; [on Thursday] US Philly Fed, CPI, capacity utilization, Euro area and Japan GDP; and [on Friday] US Univ. of Michigan Confidence. In the US, we expect Philly Fed to print in solidly expansionary territory (at 14, similar to consensus) and to inaugurate what we call the active data period of the month. We also expect CPI inflation to print at 0.3% mom (similar to consensus), and core CPI inflation at 0.18% mom (slightly above consensus).

Tyler Durden's picture

"The Gold Cartel" And The Giant Credit Bubble

The following outlines a solid statistical analysis of every aspect of the gold market, a thoroughly researched and well-presented account of the history of the modern monetary system and a highly original perspective of the growing bubble in debt and credit claims we have experienced since adopting today's system of credit-based money.

testosteronepit's picture

When $1.2 Trillion In Foreign ‘Hot Money’ Parked At The Fed Dissipates

Fits the pattern of gratuitous bank enrichment perfectly. But this time, the beneficiaries of the Fed are foreign banks.

Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Fail To Ignite Overnight Ramp In Quiet Session

It has been a very quiet session so far, and despite the slow-mo levitation in the USDJPY, its impact on US equity futures has been minimal if not negative. In fact, following yesterday's latest late day tumble, which Goldman summarized as follows, "Equities tried and failed again to break 1885, it continues to be the level that we can’t escape"... it would appear we are increasingly changing the trading regime, and as Guy Haselmann explained simply, markets are slowly but surely coming to the realization that the Fed's crutches are being taken away (that they may well return following a 20%, 30%, or more drop in the S&P is a different matter entirely) and that the economy will not grow fast enough to make up for this. Perhaps the most notable "event" is the sheer avalanche of banks pushing up their forecasts for an ECB rate cut (and or QE start) to June following Draghi's yesterday comments. And so the 1 month countdown begins until the end of forward guidance, or until the ECB "shatters" its credibility as expained yesteday.

Tyler Durden's picture

David Stockman Pulls The Plug On Janet Yellen’s Bathtub Economics

Some people are either born or nurtured into a time warp and never seem to escape. That’s Janet Yellen’s apparent problem with the “bathtub economics” of the 1960s neo-Keynesians. As has now been apparent for decades, the Great Inflation of the 1970s was a live fire drill that proved Keynesian activism doesn’t work. That particular historic trauma showed that “full employment” and “potential GDP” were imaginary figments from scribblers in Ivy League economics departments—not something that is targetable by the fiscal and monetary authorities or even measureable in a free market economy. Even more crucially, the double digit inflation, faltering growth and repetitive boom and bust macro-cycles of the 1970s and early 1980s proved in spades that interventionist manipulations designed to achieve so-called “full-employment” actually did the opposite—that is, they only amplified economic instability and underperformance as the decade wore on.

Tyler Durden's picture

Simplifying Market Noise

Confused by the market? You are not alone with irrational and "Fear of Missing Out" momentum trades and (not so great) sector re(un)rotation all that matters (as has been the case for years with fundamentals not relevant for about 24 months now), so here are some tips from Scotiabank's Guy Haselmann who believes "market noise can be simplified into the following: QE= risk on, End of QE=risk off. QE is now half way toward ending, so now is the time to adjust. The fact that…… EM central banks are hiking, China is attacking its credit bubble, and Japan hiked its VAT tax while the “third arrow” is M.I.A., are also reasons to de-risk. If sanctions on Russia expand to products or industries, then real problems to EU growth will arise. This is something to watch carefully."

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