• EconMatters
    04/27/2015 - 14:18
    If the DOJ and CFTC is going to be consistent, then they have to indict the entire financial community from the CME, Exchanges, Brokers, Institutions, Investment Banks, Hedge Funds, Management Funds...

Monetary Policy

Tyler Durden's picture

Guggenheim Sums Up The Fed's Dilemma





“Volatility is rising and asset prices are highly vulnerable to all incoming news... The amount of attention paid to rumors about QE highlights how vulnerable the U.S. economy is to the prospect of a tapering in asset purchases or a rise in interest rates. This is largely because the current economic expansion is dependent on further gains in housing, which would be adversely affected by a material rise in mortgage rates... This dynamic underpins the Federal Reserve’s current dilemma over how to normalize monetary policy. I do not anticipate an easy ride for policymakers or investors over the coming months.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Global Risk Off: Nikkei Plunges 700 Points From Intraday Highs, Whisper Away From 20% Bear Market Correction





Anyone expecting Abe to announce definitive, material growth reform instead of vague promises to slay a "deflation monster" last night was sorely disappointed. The country's PM, who may once again be reaching for the Immodium more and more frequently, said the government aims for 3% average growth over the next decade and 2% real growth, raising per capita income by JPY 1.5 million. The market laughed outright in the face of this IMF-type silly vagueness (as well as the amusing assumption that Abe will be still around in 7 years), which left untouched the most critical aspect of Abenomics: energy, and nuclear energy to be specific, and sent the USDJPY plummeting well below the 100 support line, printing 99.55 at last check. But more importantly, after surging briefly at the opening of the second half of trading to mask a feeble attempt at telegraphing the "all is well", it rolled over with a savage ferocity plunging 700 points from an intraday high of 13,711 to just above 13,000 at the lows: yet another 5% intraday swing in a market which is now flatly laughing at the BOJ's "price stability" mandate. Tonight's drop has extended the plunge from May 23 to 18.4% meaning just 1.6% lower and Japan officially enters a bear market.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Abe's "Deflation-Monster"-Slaying Third-Arrow Hints Underwhelm





UPDATE 2: Nikkei 225 touches 13,000 - down 750 from Abe highs (12,815 is 20% correction from highs)

UPDATE 1: Well that escalated quickly... Abe Speech ended-  NKY -450 from Abe spike highs, TOPIX -3% from Abe spike highs, JPY cracked back under 100 (80 pips from Abe spike), JGBs surging

For about 2 minutes there it looked as if we were back on track and by the power of jawbone alone, Abe could lift Japan from its malaise.

*ABE VOWS TO SLAY DEFLATION MONSTER WITH FISCAL, MONETARY POLICY
*ABE CALLS GROWTH STRATEGY CENTERPIECE OF ECONOMIC POLICY
*ABE WILL THOROUGHLY REMOVE ALL BARRIERS TO CORPORATE ACTIVITY

But a mere 10 minutes after vowing to slay the deflation monster, Japanese stocks have retraced their spike gains and JPY has retraced its spike lower - but on the bright side - JGBs are bid.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Here Come The Trade Wars: Europe Imposes Duties On China Solar-Panels





Recent price action amid the heavily shorted solar stocks has seemingly been predicated on hope that late May chatter of negotiated settlements in the industry would occur and everyone could go happily about their business. While hope remains for a settlement - and tariffs have been delayed 2 months, as the WSJ reports - the EU is set to announce drastic anti-dumping levies on Chinese solar panels in a move that could trigger a trade war between two of the world's largest economies:

  • *EU SAYS SOLAR-PANEL DUTY TO START AT 11% ON JUNE 6
  • *EU SAYS SOLAR-PANEL DUTY TO RISE TO 47.6% IN AUGUST
  • *EU'S DE GUCHT SAYS NOT CLOSE TO SOLAR-PANEL PACT WITH CHINA

Sadly this is playing out very similarly to the Great Depression period as tariffs and protectionism replaced domestic focused fiscal and monetary policy and escalated problems rapidly. China rejects the EU's price-dumping allegations, but the problem is not new for Beijing. The U.S. last year imposed punitive tariffs on solar panel imports after finding that China's government was subsidizing companies that were flooding the U.S. market.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Lucky 21?





All traders walking in today, have just one question in their minds: "will today be lucky 21?" or the 21st consecutive Tuesday in which the Dow Jones has closed green.

All else is irrelevant.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Problems With Japan's "Plan (jg)B": The Government Pension Investment Fund's "House Of Bonds"





Now that the BOJ's "interventionalism" in the capital markets is increasingly losing steam, as the soaring realized volatility in equity and bond markets squarely puts into question its credibility and its ability to enforce its core mandate (which, according to the Bank of Japan Act "states that the Bank's monetary policy should be aimed at achieving price stability, thereby contributing to the sound development of the national economy) Japan is left with one wildcard: the Government Pension Investment Fund (GPIF), which as of December 31 held some ¥111.9 trillion in assets, of which ¥67.3 trillion, or 60.1% in Japanese Government Bonds. Perhaps more importantly, the GPIF also held "just" ¥14.5 trillion in domestic stocks, or 12.9% of total, far less than the minimum allocation to bonds (current floor of 59%).  It is this massive potential buying dry powder that has led to numerous hints in the press (first in Bloomberg in February, then in Reuters last week, and then in the Japanese Nikkei this morning all of which have been intended to serve as a - brief - risk-on catalyst) that a capital reallocation in the GPIF is imminent to allow for much more domestic equity buying, now that the threat of the BOJ's open-ended QE is barely sufficient to avoid a bear market crash in the Nikkei in under two weeks.

There are some problems, however.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Japan’s Easy Money Tsunami





The Bank of Japan has embarked on one of the most inflationary policies ever undertaken. Pledging to inject $1.4 trillion dollars into the economy over the next two years, the policy is aimed at generating price inflation of 2% and further depreciating the Yen. The idea is to fight “deflation” and increase exports. Mises’ key insight was in looking at the long-term effects of such a policy, and in the process he examined the logic behind the short-term results as well. The ineffectiveness of the policy in the long run is apparent when one understands how prices – both domestic and foreign – interact to determine exchange rates. Exports will be promoted in the short run, though the effect will be cancelled in the long run once prices adjust. If the policy is ineffective in the long run, Mises demonstrated that the short-run gains are illusory. The same monetary policy aimed at depreciating the currency to promote international trade will reap domestic chaos.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Ron Paul: "Iraq Collapse Shows The Bankruptcy Of Interventionism"





May was Iraq’s deadliest month in nearly five years, with more than 1,000 dead – both civilians and security personnel -- in a rash of bombings, shootings and other violence. As we read each day of new horrors in Iraq, it becomes more obvious that the US invasion delivered none of the promised peace or stability that proponents of the attack promised. We must learn the appropriate lessons from the disaster of Iraq. We cannot continue to invade countries, install puppet governments, build new nations, create centrally-planned economies, engage in social engineering, and force democracy at the barrel of a gun. The rest of the world is tired of US interventionism and the US taxpayer is tired of footing the bill for US interventionism.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Abenomics On Hold As USDJPY Slides Back Under 100





While "risk-on, risk-off" has been an oft-repeated mantra in this period of extreme monetary policy machinations, it would appear the most relevant factor in the last six months is in fact "Abenomics-on" as a concerted plan to devalue the JPY has provided ammunition for carry traders to rampage through every dismal risk asset in the world. After collapsing through the Maginot Line of 100 on May 9th, JPY has rallied back and spent the last two weeks fighting over 101. It appears, given today's shift back under 100 that, for now, Abe is going to need a bigger boat. It seems, as with the Fed's balance sheets, that it's not about the 'stock' of USDJPY (level) but the 'flow' (depreciation rate) if risk assets are to continue their march ever higher in the face of a not-so-bullish reality. As one would expect, NKY futures and US (and European) equities are fading fast along with this 'driver'.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Ze Price Stabeeleetee": The Market Impact Of The BOJ's Interventions





Because when your primary stated goal is achieving "price stability" through unprecedented intervention, and instead you break the markets (both bonds and stocks) it may be time to reevaluate. As a reminder: "The Bank of Japan, as the central bank of Japan, decides and implements monetary policy with the aim of maintaining price stability. The Bank of Japan Act states that the Bank's monetary policy should be aimed at achieving price stability, thereby contributing to the sound development of the national economy." Instead, you get this...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: What Is Economic Growth? (And Why Don't We Have Any)





As we are in the final stage of the global bubble, we realize that we often fail to ask the most obvious questions. In this case, as every central banker tells us that his policies are directed to obtain growth, the obvious question is... how do we define economic growth? What is economic growth? Yes, yes, we know that what they do is simply monetize deficits and enable the transfer of wealth between sectors and generations, but there is also an intellectual battlefield, which we should be aware of. What is the view of the central banking cartel on how to grow output? Surprisingly, not via an increase in the marginal productivity of capital, but via the so called wealth effect: As interest rates fall, asset prices increase (it doesn’t matter which assets see their prices rise) and the assets can be used as collateral to leverage a higher than previously possible consumption level. This consumption level will drive output growth, and this increase in output –they believe- will bring about full employment. The wealth effect is mistakenly attributed to Keynes, who actually argued against it. Thus, the central banking cartel has its own interpretation of economic growth and it does not fit any of the 'reality' perspectives presented below.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

South Korea Demands "International Action" Against "Negative Impact" Of Abenomics





Over three months ago in "South Korea Starts Currency War Rumblings; Has Japan In Its Sights" we showed that the one nation with the biggest sensitivity to Japan's currency-destructive and export-promoting Abenomics policy is its close neighbor, South Korea. With nearly 60% of SK's entire GDP deriving from net exports, every percent drop in its trade balance result in a more than 0.5% hit to GDP: more than any nation in the world. And since South Korea and Japan compete for the same export end markets, there would be no bigger loser in a zero trade sum world than Seoul. However now that Abenomics is in its sixth month, and South Korea's max export pain threshold has been reached, the country no longer will stay silent. As the FT reports, "South Korea has warned that G8 leaders need to do more to tackle the “unintended consequences” of Japan’s monetary easing when they gather for a summit later this month amid mounting concerns about the knock-on effects of a weaker yen. In an interview, Hyun Oh-seok, the South Korean finance minister and deputy prime minister, said that international co-ordinated action was needed to mitigate the impact of so-called “Abenomics” on currency markets."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Central Bankers Still Don't Get It





In the wake of the financial collapse of 2007, central banks around the world run by Keynesian zealots religiously applied the formulas they had been taught would boost aggregate demand and rescue the economy from the brink of total catastrophe. Easy money, going under the euphemistic moniker of “quantitative easing” was supposed to stimulate borrowing, spending and growth through the mechanism of historically low interest rates. Predictably, this approach failed miserably, as these kind of policy decisions largely miss the point of how the economy really works. As long as central banks continue to meddle with the money supply, investments will not be made efficiently and the economy as a whole will suffer.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Dollar Firm, but Fundamentals may Challenge the Bulls





Outlook for the dollar and major foreign currencies in the week ahead.

 
Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!