Monetary Policy

The Complete Fed Preview (Or Why The Dollar Is Falling)

While The Fed is a "motivated rate raiser," it appears that they are losing confidence in their growth forecasts, which means, as Goldman Sachs notes, another downgrade to the long run rate tomorrow, bringing the cumulative reduction in the Fed’s tightening cycle over the past year to 75 bps. There is a good chance the market will see this as a signal to sell the Dollar, on the grounds that the Fed will look increasingly uncertain over the medium-term trajectory of policy.

Something Unexpected Emerges In China's Latest Money And Credit Data

China's corporate bond market, one of the fastest growing sources of cheap credit, did something in May it hasn't done in in six years: it shrank.  And then there was the record contraction in banker's acceptance bills, a pseudo currency used by companies for payments that have been the subject of several instances of massive fraud. Hopes for a big credit push are again being dashed.

Gundlach: "Central Banks Are Losing Control" - His Latest Presentation

"Central banks are losing control and they don't know what to do ... just like the Republican establishment and Donald Trump.... The Fed is confused and their confusion spills into investor psychology," said Gundlach, who oversees more than $100 billion at Los Angeles-based DoubleLine. "The Fed changes its tone so frequently, it seems every other week the message is different. They’ve turned into the 'Zombie Fed.' They say the meeting this week is 'live,' but investors all know it isn't at all."

All Eyes On Yellen As Global Stocks Rebound Despite Brexit Fears, Record Low Yields

US equity index futures and global stocks rebounded for the first time in 6 days, ahead of Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen’s remarks, while Chinese manipulation prevented a selloff in Chinese stocks when MSCI refused to add the country to its EM index due to fears about... manipulation. Sterling has rebounded despite ongoing Brexit doom and gloom. Oil is the only key commodity that has failed to stage a modest rebound, while gold is down alongside the dollar, just because.

QE: The Good, Bad And Ugly (Or, Why War Is Coming)

"The ugly part comes in when thinking about how to exit QE, if at all. Unfortunately I can't help but think of how the Great Depression ended: it was a boost of fiscal spending, all right: the financing of a war... note that increasing military expenditures in the name of national defense may be more easily passed through the legislature in countries without strong majorities than infrastructure spending. Add to that a rise in populist politicians throughout the world, and we have a mix that suggests to me history may well repeat to those unwilling to learn from it."

Tyranny Of The PhDs

Sad to say, you haven’t seen nothin’ yet. The world is drifting into financial entropy, and it is going to get steadily worse. That’s because the emerging stock market slump isn’t just another cyclical correction; it’s the opening phase of the end-game. That is, the end game of the PhD Tyranny.

Soaring Brexit Fears Spark Global Flight To Safety, Send 10 Year Bunds Tumbling Below 0%

The UK EU referendum is suddenly totally dominant in financial markets. The increased focus comes as the leave campaign has gathered steam as 4 polls yesterday afternoon/evening put the 'leave' campaign ahead. As a result of the continued global scramble for safety, German 10Y bunds finally dropped below 0% for the first time ever, while global risk assets are red around the globe.

'X' Marks The Spot - Wages Started Losing When The Dollar Delinked From Gold In 1971

At “X” Marks the Spot, "[s]omething happened," and the wages of goods-producing workers flatlined, never to recover. As it happens, “X” correlates with Nixon shutting down the Bretton Woods gold standard in 1971 and the epic failure to get it fixed and restored in 1973. The drag, after a modest lag, filtered into the working economy. The rest is persistent stagnation for median families.

The Fed Has Whiffed Again - Massive Monetary Stimulus Has Not Helped Labor, Part 2

In today’s world of flexible just-in-time production, hours-based labor scheduling and gig-based employment patterns, there is really no such standardized labor unit as a “job”. In that context, a simple paint-by-the-numbers exercise demonstrates the foolishness of the Fed’s obsession with hitting a quantitative “full employment” target.

€348 Million: ECB Releases First Total Of Corporate Bond Purchases

As part of today's update of the ECB's asset purchases, the central bank announced for the first time, in addition to its various other sovereign and covered-bond purchases, just how many corporate bonds it had bought in the open market under its infamous CSPP, or corporate bond buying program, which officially launched on June 3. The result: a mere €348 million in purchases on the first day in which the program was operational.

Paul Singer Joins Icahn, Soros; Warns "It's A Very Dangerous Time To Be In The Market", Buys Gold

"The cure for the crisis — for the debt crisis, the financial crisis — has been deemed by the developed world governments to be more debt. There has not been a deleveraging. And after seven and a half years and counting of this mix of policies, at the moment we’re either in a stage of stagnation or rollover, possibly in the early stages of a global recession. So I think it’s a very dangerous time in the financial markets."

The Fed Has Whiffed Again - Massive Monetary Stimulus Has Not Helped Labor, Part 1

There is a deep irony embedded in the Fed’s savage assault on savers and its delusional doctrine of interest rate repression. While this actually results in monumental windfalls to speculators and the one percent, it’s all justified in the name of boosting the labor market and the wage bill. All this money printing has been for naught. Notwithstanding the 9X eruption of the Fed’s balance sheet from $500 billion at the turn of the century to $4.5 trillion today, growth in the most basic measure of labor input - total hours worked - has come to a grinding halt.