• Tim Knight from...
    11/26/2014 - 19:43
    I read your post Pity the Sub Genius and agreed with a lot of what you wrote. However you missed what I think is the biggest killer of middle class jobs, and that is technological...

Monetary Policy

Tyler Durden's picture

How The Petrodollar Quietly Died, And Nobody Noticed





The Petrodollar, long serving as the US leverage to encourage and facilitate USD recycling, and a steady reinvestment in US-denominated assets by the Oil exporting nations, and thus a means to steadily increase the nominal price of all USD-priced assets, just drove itself into irrelevance. A consequence of this year's dramatic drop in oil prices, the shift is likely to cause global market liquidity to fall.  This decline follows years of windfalls for oil exporters such as Russia, Angola, Saudi Arabia and Nigeria. Much of that money found its way into financial markets, helping to boost asset prices and keep the cost of borrowing down, through so-called petrodollar recycling. But no more: "this year the oil producers will effectively import capital amounting to $7.6 billion.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Yellen Shocked After Fisher Again Reveals Fed Is Source Of Record Inequality





As Janet Yellen prepares to meet with President Obama this morning for the first time, it appears The Dallas Fed's Richard Fisher has planted a rather uncomfortable tape bomb for her to explain:

FISHER: QE3 WAS A GIFT TO THE RICH

So right before the Midterm elections, a week after Janet Yellen discussed inequality, she is summoned to meet with The 'fair' President to explain how her policy is keeping Obama's dream alive?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Housing Is Dead: First-Time Buyers Collapse To 27-Year Lows





The Millennials (one of the biggest generations in US history) are just not getting with the status quo program. As we detailed previously, with lower credit scores, less disposable income, and a soaring number of people living with their parents; so it should be no surprise that The National Association of Realtors (NAR) today admitted that first-time homebuyers plunged to the lowest level in 27 years. The blame - of course - rather than low/no-growth fiscal policies, student debt servitude, and inequality-driving cheap-funding monetary policy, is price comnpettion from 'investors' and too "stringent credit standards," perfectly mirroring FHFA's Mel Watt's Einsteinian insanity desire to dramatically ease lending standards and slash minimum down-payments (as we noted previously). Perhaps NAR accidentally stumbles on the biggest reason no one is buying in their profiling: the typical first-time buyer was 31-years-old, while the typical repeat buyer was 53 - smack in the middle of the Millennial collapse.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Lack Of Daily Central Bank Intervention Fails To Push Futures Solidly Higher, Yen Implosion Continues





While it is unclear whether it is due to the rare event that no central bank stepped in overnight with a massive liquidity injection or because the USDJPY tracking algo hasn't been activated (moments ago Abe's deathwish for the Japanese economy made some more progress with the USDJPY hitting new mult-year highs just shy of 113.6, on its way to 120 and a completely devastated Japanese economy), but European equities have traded in the red from the get-go, with investor sentiment cautious as a result of a disappointing the Chinese manufacturing report. More specifically, Chinese Manufacturing PMI printed a 5-month low (50.8 vs. Exp. 51.2 (Prev. 51.1)), with new orders down to 51.6 from 52.2, new export orders at 49.9 from 50.2 in September. Furthermore, this morning’s batch of Eurozone PMIs have failed to impress with both the Eurozone and German readings falling short of expectations (51.4 vs Exp. 51.8, Last 51.8), with France still residing in contractionary territory (48.5, vs Exp and Last 47.3).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Zombie System: How Capitalism Has Gone Off The Rails





"Solutions to the world's problems are not produced in a meeting between Bill Gates and George Soros... Renewal has to come from below... Limiting the influence [of the richest] is of the utmost importance... so that today's upper-class, high-finance capitalism can once again revert to being a capitalism of the real economy and the societal center."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

There Is No Stable Monetary Policy "Risk Channel"





When a central bank buys an asset directly (often government bonds), it drives up the price of this asset, the demand for which increases. But the prices of the other asset classes increase only if the economic agents that have sold the first assets to the central bank use the money received to buy these other asset classes. This transmission of increases in asset prices to all asset classes is therefore unstable, since it depends on the behaviour of investors and savers. There is therefore no stable monetary policy "risk channel"; the only asset prices that are controlled by central banks in the longer run are those of the assets that central banks buy directly... hence Japan has now resorted to buying Japanese stocks directly.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Chart Of The Day: US Decouples From The Rest Of The World... And From The US Itself





The global economy is like a jetliner that needs all of its engines operational to take off and steer clear of clouds and storms. Unfortunately, as Nouriel Roubini tells The Guardian, only one of its four engines is functioning properly: the Anglosphere (the United States and its close cousin, the United Kingdom). As Roubini continues, the question is whether and for how long the global economy can remain aloft on a single engine. Weakness in the rest of the world implies a stronger dollar, which will invariably weaken US growth. The deeper the slowdown in other countries and the higher the dollar rises, the less the US will be able to decouple from the funk everywhere else, even if domestic demand seems robust. But it's not just the rest of the world that is decoupling from US growth... as the following uncomfortable chart shows, so is a crucial pillar of monetary policy transmission, consumer wealth perception, and economic stability - the US housing market itself.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Divergence Aids Dollar, but No Currency War





When Calpers buys an international asset for its investors, is it intervening in the forex market on behalf of the US?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

When Money Dies: Germany and Paper Money After 1910





The story of the destruction of the German mark during the hyper-inflation of Weimar Germany from 1919 to its horrific peak in November 1923 is usually dismissed as a bizarre anomaly in the economic history of the twentieth century. But no episode better illustrates the dire consequences of unsound money or makes a more devastating, real-life case against fiat-currency: where there is no restraint, monetary death will follow.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Did QE Work?





Spoiler Alert: No!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

QE Added $9 Trillion In "Equity Wealth" Or 32% Of The Current S&P500 Level, JPMorgan Finds





"The decline in asset yields especially during QE3 created large wealth effects. Since the Fed's QE started at the end of 2008 the PE multiple of the S&P500 index (12-month forward) went up by five points, from 10.5 at the end of 2008 to 15.5 currently. This PE multiple expansion is responsible for around 650 index points or 32% of the current S&P500 index level. Extending that to the total stock of US corporate equities ($29tr currently), it implies an equity wealth boost of $9tr."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Saxobank CIO Warns USDJPY Could Hit 135 On "One Trick Pony" BoJ Desperation





From a market perspective the move today was almost perfectly timed coming on the heels of a Federal Open Market Committee meeting which ended quantitative easing and expose the big difference on future monetary paths between the BoJ and the Fed. There is, however, a dark side to this big move.. telling a story of how central banks, even the desperate ones like BoJ, are and remain one-trick-pony institutions: "this is the final round – Japan was ALWAYS going to give it one more shot – now it happened."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed Launches First Currency War Salvo, Tells ECB Not To Push Too Far





Now that The Fed is (however briefly) out of the money-printing business, it appears to have turned its attention to the rest of the world's "despicable monetary policy" actions and fired what seems to be the first warning shot of 'currency wars 2.0', as MarketNews reports:

ECB SOURCE SAY EUR3 BILLION BALANCE SHEET TARGET NOT IN THE CARDS: MNI
ECB SOURCE FED HAS NOTICED EUR SLIDE AND ECB MUST NOT PUSH TOO FAR: MNI

One wonders how long before Jack Lew also proclaims Japan a 'currency manipulator' (and, gasp, the Eurozone) especially after Germany's Wolfgang Schaeuble reminded the world this morning that "growth can't be helped by printing money." You don't say...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed's Kocherlakota Explains Why He Wants Moar





The lone dissenting dove at this week's 'end-of-QE' FOMC meeting has taken digital pen to pixelated paper to explain why moar is better and the Fed should not stop printing..."Of course, there are costs and benefits to every monetary policy action and inaction, and assessing those costs and benefits is by no means straightforward. On this occasion, my assessment differed from that of my colleagues," as he believes the inflation outlook has worsened. As a reminder, Kocherlakota was the 'gentleman' who fired dissenting economists at the Minneapolis Fed for disgreeing with his Neo-Keynesian philosophy.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman On BOJ's Banzainomics: "We Highlight The Potential For Harsh Criticism Of Further Cost-Push Inflation"





It was about several months ago when Goldman, which initially was an enthusiastic supporter of BOJ's QE, turned sour on both Abenomics and the J-Curve (perhaps after relentless mocking on these pages), changed its tune, saying an unhappy ending for Abenomics is almost certainly in the cards. Not surprisingly then, in its post-mortem of the BOJ's overnight action, already being affectionately called Banzainomics, is hardly glowing, and is summarized as follows: "We maintain our view that unless the yen continues to depreciate significantly, as a result of the latest QQE action, the BOJ is unlikely to meet its scenario for inflation to stably reach 2% during FY2015. From a political perspective, with nationwide local elections looming in April 2015, we also highlight the potential for harsh criticism of further cost-push inflation driven by the weaker yen among nonmanufacturers, SMEs, and households. Irrespective of the latest easing moves, we believe the BOJ is treading a very narrow path."

 
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