Money On The Sidelines

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No, It's Not A "Stock Picker's Market", Whatever That Means





One of the phrases which we have done our best to bury over the last few years has been the absolutely idiotic statement "money on the sidelines" (and right behind it "more sellers|buyers than buyers|sellers"). Sadly a group of persistent, if clueless bobble-headed automatons still insist on using it. So be it. Today, however, we will focus on yet another absolutely idiotic phrase: "a stock picker's market." Leaving aside the linguistic stupidity of this expert "assessment" (because nothing says fundamental equity analysis like picking non-stocks), the mere facts flat out refute any suggestion that there is any material, or frankly, any dispersion, i.e., the proverbial stockpickeryness. But don't take our word. Here is Goldman's.

 


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An HFT-Rigged Market: How A Rogue Algo Destroyed The BATS IPO





Considering the rancorous debate currently going on between Michael Lewis (we will have more to say about it shortly), DirectEdge CEO William O'Brien and IEX employee and latest HFT whistleblower, Brad Katsuyma, on CNBC, we decided that this would be an opportune moment to remind readers how BATS, which currently owns DirectEdge, IPOed, or rather how it failed to IPO, when it crashed and burned in its attempt to go public on March 23, 2012, when a rogue algo destabilized the order book and promptly sent the indicative price from around $16 to 0... in less than a second - perheps the perfect testament to just what HFT really does.... and just so readers have an objective perspective of how "unrigged" the market truly is.

 


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WTF Chart Of The Day: Fun-Durr-Mentals Edition





Money on the sidelines? EM fixed? Expectations of a terrible jobs number tapering the taper? One thing we do know for absolute certain - this ramp in stocks has nothing whatsoever to do with fun-durr-mentals... as USDJPY 102 takes the S&P back to unch on the Taper and above its 100DMA.

 


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Presenting The US&PJPY 500





EM is fixed? Fed will un-Taper? Earnings will recover? Money on the sidelines? We've heard it all this morning as why stocks are recovering modestly... the real fun-durr-mental reason, of course, is in the chart below: behold the US&PJPY or, alternatively, USDSPY.

 


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Stop The Presses: Reuben Kressel, 66, Of Rego Park, Queens, Sells His 500 Shares Of Twitter





Wondering why TWTR is down today? Wonder no more... The Wall Street Journal has seen fit to publish the full unadulterated story of how Reuben Kressel, 66, of Rego Park bought (and then stunningly sold) 500 shares of Twitter in just a few weeks for a 76% profit. "I sold out completely," Kressel warns, adding that he "didn't want to take any more chances."  Of course, the brokers love it... "in stocks like Twitter, the retail investor is finally starting to come back," Wedbush's director of equity trading gloats, "for the first time in a long time, retail investors are really starting to act differently." Forgive our modest sarcasm and incredulity but when this is an important business news story, believing that we are in anything but a bubble is akin to admitting to be the greater fool.

 


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Charles Schwab Warns "We Are In A Manipulated Market"





While the world of mainstream media stock pundits would like investors to believe that there is a wall of money on the sidelines waiting anxiously to go all-in on stocks (bear in mind there's a seller for every buyer and where does the cash on the sidelines go when it is handed over to the seller in return for his stock?), as none other than Charles Schwab notes in this brief Bloomberg TV clip, "investors are less rattled" than most believe, "and have stayed invested" in large part. "There hasn't been a wholesale movement away from stocks," he goes on, busting myths asunder, adding that "investors want to see market-driven conditions, not Fed manipulated ones."

 


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7 More Years Of Low Rates.. And Then War?





While chart analogs provide optically pleasing (and often far too shockingly correct) indications of the human herd tendencies towards fear and greed, a glance through the headlines and reporting of prior periods can provide just as much of a concerning 'analog' as any chart. In this case, while these 3 pictures can paint a thousand words; a thousand words may also paint the biggest picture of all. It seems, socially and empirically, it is never different this time as these 1936 Wall Street Journal archives read only too well... from devaluations lifting stocks to inflationary side-effects of money flow and from short-covering, money-on-the-sidelines, Jobs, Europe, low-volume ramps, BTFD, and profit-taking, to brokers advising stocks for the long-run before a 40% decline.

 


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Bonds Battered And Stocks "Plunge" 0.2% Despite Intraday Ramp





Credit markets have been nervous for over a week. Treasury yields have been rising notably. The USD has been pushing higher and with all eyes focused on the momo name du jour (and indices 'near' all-time highs) it seems few have noticed US equities have actually had 3 down days in the last 5 days. Only NASDAQ managed a green close. Of course, this is merely an excuse buy moar with all the money on the sidelines but today's move in Treasuries (and intraday volatility in stocks) suggest some anxiety is back that a flow-slowing Taper is closer on the horizon of hope than many believe. Oil and Gold lost ground on the day - though the latter is the best of the commodities on the week. The USD is back to unchanged on the week (with CAD and EUR weakness in charge). VIX diverged higher into the close with its first up-day in the last six.

 

 


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Nigeria Just Can't Catch A Break, Blames Fed For Pulled Bond Sale





Global stock markets are soaring and near record highs. Credit markets are exuberant and near record tight spreads and low yields; and volatility (bond, FX, and stock) has been suppressed to the point of non-existence. So why is it that just 3 months after Nigeria issued debt (in an oversubscribed auction) at a yield below that of Portugal's, Nigerian lender Diamond Bank has suspended the launch of its seven-year $550 million bond? It appears it's the Fed's fault! as the bond's marketers noted "pricing turbulence in the international debt market," in a presentation seen by Reuters on Tuesday. Still think the Fed will ever actually exit?

 


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It's 315 PM: Have You BTFATH Today?





With the Dow Transports leading the way (now up for the 10th of the last 11 days and 9.7% off its debt-ceiling-debacle lows), US equity markets are engorged on the euphoria of this "can't lose" scenario that offers free lunches (and ponies) for everyone. On the heels of SocGen's call (eerily reminiscent of Schiff's and Faber's prophecy of rising QE no matter what), it's 315pm, have you greatly rotated your money on the sidelines to BTFATH yet?

 


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Visualizing The Triumph Of Hope Over Reality





One of these things is not like the other...

 


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And It's Gone: Guy Walks Into Citi Branch, Loses $40,000





The following story from Bloomberg's Jonathan Weil should be familiar to anyone who i) wanted to get rich quick; ii) wasn't too willing to read the small print, and iii) put their faith in a TBTF bank. Or simply watches South Park. Jon recounts the story of "Philip L. Ramatlhware, an immigrant from Botswana who went to a Citigroup branch in downtown Philadelphia one day five years ago to open a regular bank account. He was 48 years old at the time and disabled, after being hurt in an accident as a passenger on a Greyhound bus. In April 2008, he received $225,000 in a settlement for his injuries, part of which went to pay legal fees. He was holding the settlement check when he walked into the branch. Immediately he was referred to a broker for a “financial consultation,” according to an arbitration claim he filed against Citigroup. The broker assured him the money would be invested in “guaranteed” funds and that he could have access to them whenever the need arose, the complaint said. Ramatlhware gave him $150,000 to invest. The broker put $5,000 into a bank certificate of deposit, bought a $133,000 variable annuity and invested the rest in a series of mutual funds. Less than six months later, Ramatlhware had lost $40,000, according to the complaint."

 


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Uncle Sam Wants You To Invest In "The Patriot Fund"





Tired of having your easily-earned (thanks to Benny and the Inkjets) wealth effect go straight to fund the pressure cooking terrorist operations of ole' evil Osama (because that's how stock market investing apparently works)? Have no fear: because Uncle Sam wants you to invest in The Patriot Fund. "The Patriot Fund, www.patriotfund.com, was launched to meet the previously unmet need of a terror-free investment option."  So... there is an unmet need of terror-free investing? It appears so. And while Uncle Sam doesn't actually demand you invest your "money on the sidelines" in this latest carnival attraction of the ever more ridiculous US stock market circus, we give it a few months before it becomes a choice: put your money here or get an IRS audit. Because what is more important than "terror-free" investing?...

 


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Why Bulls Should Fear The "Money On The Sidelines"





Much has been made of equity inflows this week (though we note a significant outflow from high-yield bond funds - just as risk-on in its nature) and once again the money-on-the-sidelines fallacy is hawked at every opportunity. Two critical aspects are important to get past this 'fact' as some positive driver. First, money does not 'enter' the market, it is swapped (e.g. Person A's cash is used to buy shares from Person B; after the transaction the roles are swapped with Person B holding cash on the sidelines and Person A holding shares); and secondly, as Morgan Stanley's Gerard Minack notes, despite all the disclaimers – retail flows assume that past performance is a good guide to future outcomes. Consequently money tends to flow to investments that have done well, rather than investments that will do well.

 


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