Moral Hazard

The Cashless Society - Keynesian "Stability" Vs Trumpian Turmoil

"Keynesianism has always been at war with savings since its principle tenet is that savings are bad, consumption is good. The Keynesian central planning authorities at the Fed and elsewhere would like to see a cashless society because keeping cash can be a form of savings instead of consumption. I think we are headed toward a cashless society unless the public wakes up and begins to protest this... which is why the establishment despises Trump as the figurehead for this awakening...If I were Donald Trump I would also double or triple my personal security detail."

Global Stocks Soar On Stimulus Hopes After Miserable Chinese, Japanese Data; Short Squeeze

"The Chinese market didn’t react as bad as we feared and with the weak export data there is some big hope that he central banks will react quite fast," John Plassard, senior equity-sales trader at Mirabaud Securities LLP in Geneva, told Bloomberg. "It’s a mix of hope of intervention from the Asian central bank, short squeeze and also a relief in some energy and banking sectors, the most shorted sectors." And there are your catalysts for today's surge: hope of more central bank intervention and a global short squeeze.

Through The Looking Glass On Rates

Negative interest rates act effectively as a hidden tax funneled directly to banks. They are inherently unhealthy. Currently, they could indicate also a measure of unease among two of the four most powerful central banks. If so, that could well escalate.

SEC Throws Up On Third Avenue's Gating Plan (Then Folds)

Update: The SEC Folds - SEC PERMITS TEMPORARY SUSPENSION OF THIRD AVENUE REDEMPTIONS, WILL BE SUBJECT TO ONGOING SEC OVERSIGHT

HYG, the now infamous high-yield bond ETF, had an "ok" day, rallying along with everything else post-Fed. However, shortly after the close, it started to fade quickly as SEC "expressed concerns" about Third Avenue's plan for liquidation.

It Begins: Desperate Finland Set To Unleash Helicopter Money Drop To All Citizens

Over the last few months, in a prime example of currency failure and euro-defenders' narratives, Finland has been sliding deeper into depression. Almost 7 years into the the current global expansion, Finland's GDP is 6pc below its previous peak. As The Telegraph reports, this is a deeper and more protracted slump than the post-Soviet crash of the early 1990s, or the Great Depression of the 1930s. And so, having tried it all, Finnish authorities are preparing to unleash "helicopter money" to save their nation by giving every citizen a tax-free payout of around $900 each month!