Mortgage Loans

Frontrunning: November 2

  • U.S. Election Angst Spreads as Stocks Drop, Bonds Rise (BBG)
  • Fed Doesn’t Aim to Push Inflation Beyond 2% (WSJ)
  • Tighter Race Brings a Shift in Tactics (WSJ)
  • After another release of documents, FBI finds itself caught in a partisan fray (WaPo)
  • Trump Tells Early Voters to Change Their Ballots If They Have 'Buyer's Remorse' (ABC)
  • More Pot, Fewer Guns, Higher Pay: Other Big Issues on the Ballot (BBG)
  • Banks No Longer Make the Bulk of U.S. Mortgages (WSJ)

China Injects Economy With A Quarter Trillion In Debt In One Month, But The Full Story Is Much Scarier

"From a growth rate perspective, the speed of credit expansion is alarming. The current pace of credit growth in China is realistically in a range between 19% and 20%, well above the reported official TSF growth of 12.4% and new loan growth of 13.0% in September. Relative to GDP, China’s credit-to-GDP ratio currently in a range from 260% to 275% of GDP as of September 2016" - Barclays

Frontrunning: October 5

  • ECB 'taper' talk hits stocks, sterling hits 31-year low (Reuters)
  • Crude Rises to Three-Month High After U.S. Stockpiles Plunge (BBG)
  • Gross Says He Shortened Duration on Europe After Taper News (BBG)
  • Chicago Fed's Evans 'fine' with December hike if data stays firm (Reuters)
  • Euro zone business growth at 21-month low in September (Reuters)
  • Deutsche Bank Brings Too-Big-to-Fail Quandary Home to Merkel (BBG)

China Floods Economy With Over Rmb 1 Trillion In New August Credit

When one month ago China announced that it had created just Rmb 488 billion in new credit as per its broadest credit aggregation metric, Total Social Financing, there was broad concern that the PBOC had again hit the brakes on the country's rampant credit expansion. Those concerns were more than allayed, however, overnight, when the PBOC released its latest August new credit data, which saw total credit grow by well over Rmb 1 trillion.

Developing Countries Emulate The US, Turn Citizens Into Debt Slaves

One of the big advantages of being a Latin American or Asian country used to be - somewhat counter-intuitively - the lack of credit available to most citizens. The banking system in, say, Brazil or Thailand simply wasn’t “advanced” enough to offer credit card, auto, or mortgage loans on a scale sufficient to turn the locals into US-style debt slaves. But that, alas, is changing as those countries adopt their rich cousins’ worst habits.

"It's Probably Not Nothing"

Normally, we would say "it's probably nothing" - after all central banks "got this", only in this case it isn't.

As Libor Blows Out To Fresh 6 Year Highs, A $28 Trillion Debt Question Emerges

while blowing out unsecured funding rates may no longer be a flashing red flag, a question has emerged as a lot of debt references Libor, debt ranging from household debt to non-financial business debt: some $28 trillion of it, to be specific, and just in the US. The question is just how concerned will the borrowers of said debt be once they get their next due balance.

D-Day For Australia's Real Estate Bubble?

This rotting shack in Sydney and its tiny plot of land sold for nearly $1 million in May of 2014 – more than two years ago. Since then, house prices in Australia have increased even further. Yes, it is an insane bubble, no doubt about it... and now, it appears, the banks are finally realizing, and are pulling back.

This Has Never Happened Outside Of A Recession

The Fed's latest Senior Loan Officer Survey for July 2016 showed that banks continued to tighten standards on commercial loans in 2016 for both commercial and industrial (C&I) and commercial real estate (CRE). This was the fourth straight quarter of tighter standards: something that has never happened outside of a recession.

G-20 Meeting Ends With Rising Discord Between China And US

While the G-20 group traditionally tries to put on a united front, a curious divergence emerged following the latest meeting in China, where as Bloomberg notes Chinese and U.S. officials "showed signs of being at odds on how synchronized efforts to boost global growth need to be, with China stressing the need for improved coordination more than the U.S."U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew on Thursday talked down the need for crisis-level coordination as he headed to Chengdu, China, for the meeting.