Natural Gas

Wall Street's Biggest Banks May Have To Make Good On $26 Billion In Oil Hedges

"The fair value of hedges held by 57 U.S. companies in the Bloomberg Intelligence North America Independent Explorers and Producers index rose to $26 billion as of Dec. 31, a fivefold increase from the end of September," Bloomberg writes, noting that the very same Wall Street banks on the hook for the hedges also financed the shale boom.

Frontrunning: April 9

  • Greece pleads cash running out, told to hasten reforms (Reuters)
  • ECB Cash Said Likely to Fall Short of Greek Request This Week (BBG)
  • Chinese Stock Buying Frenzy Sweeps Into Hong  (WSJ)
  • Shell’s $70 Billion BG Deal Meets Shareholder Skepticism (BBG)
  • Yemen's Houthis seize provincial capital despite Saudi-led raids (Reuters)
  • Iran Nuclear Deal Gives Syria’s Bashar al-Assad Reason to Worry (WSJ)
  • Slow apps, low battery life limit appeal of Apple Watch (Reuters)
  • Gilead’s $1,000 Pill Is Hard for States to Swallow (WSJ)
  • The Oil Industry's $26 Billion Life Raft (BBG)

Frontrunning: April 8

  • Shell Will Buy BG Group for $70 Billion in Cash and Shares (BBG)
  • IMF warns of long period of lower growth (FT)
  • Wall Street sanguine as it heads into worst earnings season in six years (Reuters)
  • Switzerland First With 10-Year Bond at Negative Yield (WSJ)
  • U.S. Dot-Com Bubble Was Nothing Compared to Today’s China Prices (BBG)
  • Rahm Emanuel Re-Elected as Mayor of Fiscally Ravaged Chicago (BBG)
  • Oil falls on U.S. stock build, record Saudi output (Reuters)
  • White South Carolina policeman charged with murdering black man (Reuters)
  • German Factory Orders Drop for Second Month (BBG)
  • A third of Republicans support Iran nuclear deal (Reuters)

Futures Flat On Minutes Day; Chinese Bubble Spills Into Hong Kong; Biggest Energy M&A Deal In Over A Decade

While US equity futures are largely unchanged, if only ahead of the now daily pre-open market-wide ramp, things in Asia have continued on their bubbly flurry, where China's Shanghai Composite briefly rose above 4000 for the first time since 2008, but it was the surge in the Hong Kong stock market that showed the Chinese bubble is finally spilling over, in the form of a blistering rally on the Hang Seng which rose nearly 4% on immense volume which at 250 billion Hong Kong dollars ($32 billion) was three times the average daily volume over the past year and nearly 20% more than the previous record volume day in October 2007, at the height of the pre-financial crisis bubble.

Back From Holiday, European Stocks Celebrate Atrocious US Jobs Data, Jump Over 1%

Yesterday it was only the US that got the full benefit of the market-wide stop hunt that sent the US market soaring on its biggest opening ramp in 2015 following the worst payroll data since 2013, because Europe was closed for Easter Monday. Which means today it was Europe's turn to celebrate atrocious US data (yes, yes, snow - because somehow tremendous January and February jobs data was not impacted by snow), and in the first European trading session of the week, equities have started off on the front-foot.

What If An Oil Rebound Never Comes?

Oil prices will remain subdued for the next 20 years. That comes from a new policy brief from Stanford economist Frank Wolak, who says that a series of phenomena – surging U.S. shale production, a weakening OPEC, the shale revolution spreading globally, efficiencies in drilling, and more natural gas substitution for oil – will combine to prevent oil prices from rising above $100 per barrel anytime soon.

Frontrunning: April 2

  • Samaras Says He’d Join Alliance to Keep Greece in Euro (BBG)
  • Tensions with Warren camp could loom over Clinton campaign (Reuters)
  • Ackman Report on Herbalife in China Figures in Probe (WSJ)
  • Al Shabaab storms Kenyan university, 14 reported killed (Reuters)
  • Iraq’s Four-Mile Line of Supertankers Fuels Shipping-Rates Surge (BBG)
  • Menendez's fate could sharpen Republicans' edge in Senate (Reuters)
  • IRS Chief Chides Ted Cruz Over 'Abolish the IRS' Mantra (BBG)
  • Yemen Houthi fighters backed by tanks reach central Aden (Reuters)

"Electric Cars Are Doing More Harm Than Good" Professor Warns

"An electric car does not make you green... You’re better off filling up at the pump," if you live in Canada. According to a new study by professor Chris Kennedy, even if every driver in Canada made the switch - from gas to electric - the total emissions might not actually go down... since in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia, electric cars generate more carbon pollution over their lifetimes than gas-powered cars. Paging Al Gore...

Futures Wipe Out Early Gains In Volatile Session As Dollar Resumes Climb; Oil Slides

After a few days of dollar weakness due to concerns that the Fed's rate hike intentions have been derailed following some undisputedly ugly economic data (perhaps the Fed should just make it clear there will never be rate hikes during the winter ever again) the USD has resumed its rise, and as a result risk assets, after surging early in the overnight session driven by the Nikkei225 and the Emini, the "strong dollar is bad for risk" trade has re-emerged, with the Nikkei dropping almost 500 points off its intraday highs, with US equity futures poised to open lower once more, sliding nearly 20 points in the overnight session, and surprising the BTFDers who have not seen five consecutive days of "risk-off" in a long time.

China Hard Landing: Blame The Smog

Bloomberg estimates industrial output may have to be slashed by a fifth in order for Beijing to hit its own pollution targets and by up to 40% if China wants its citizens to be able to breathe the same air as the rest of the world.

Beyond Iran And Pakistan: 7 Nuclear Wannabes

While fear still lingers of a nuclear catastrophe on a similar scale as Fukushima, or earlier accidents such as Three Mile Island or Chernobyl, that hasn’t stopped a slew of countries from moving forward on plans to develop nuclear plants as an adjunct to existing power sources like hydro, coal, natural gas and good ol’ oil. Especially in developing countries that lack access to fossil fuels, nuclear is seen as a viable and cost-effective form of baseload power.